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Can stress trigger Parkinson's? And new criteria for frontotemporal dementia syndromes.

Stream Can stress trigger Parkinson's? And new criteria for frontotemporal dementia syndromes. by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
22

A reform too late and a “redisorganisation” too far

The World Health Organization is at the forefront of our efforts to defeat Ebola virus disease. Preventing and treating communicable diseases were the making of WHO as an international organisation capable of delivering successful health campaigns. Historically, Africa has preoccupied WHO more than any other continent. Recent pandemic threats, from avian flu to Middle East respiratory syndrome, readied WHO for the current crisis that now threatens 15 countries (doi:10.1136/bmj.g6305).  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
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Management of arteriovenous fistulas

Complications include infection, thrombosis, stenosis, aneurysmal change, steal syndrome, and high output cardiac failure  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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'Stronger warnings needed' over pregnant women drinking - BBC News

Campaigners and doctors are calling for stronger warnings about drinking during pregnancy, ahead of a legal test case on foetal alcohol syndrome.  
BBC News
over 5 years ago
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Can stress trigger Parkinson's? And new criteria for frontotemporal dementia syndromes.

Stream Can stress trigger Parkinson's? And new criteria for frontotemporal dementia syndromes. by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 5 years ago
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1
32

Childhood conditions and illnesses - Health tools - NHS Choices

A visual guide to childhood illnesses including common conditions including measles, slapped cheek syndrome, chickenpox and warts.  
nhs.uk
over 5 years ago
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1
57

Guyon's Canal , Ulnar tunnel syndrome .Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Educational video describing compression of the ulnar nerve in the Guyon's canal. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me o...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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2
132

Pathophysiology and management of acute coronary syndromes

Stream Pathophysiology and management of acute coronary syndromes by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 5 years ago
Preview
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15

Journal Club: CPAP for the metabolic syndrome in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

Stream Journal Club: CPAP for the metabolic syndrome in patients with obstructive sleep apnea by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 5 years ago
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40

AKI and CKD: An Integrated Clinical Syndrome

How exactly is the severity of AKI linked to the progression of CKD and what type of long-term renal damage could occur? This new study investigates.  
medscape.com
over 5 years ago
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haemolytic uraemic syndrome - General Practice Notebook

FREE subscriptions for doctors and students... click hereYou have 3 open access pages.  
gpnotebook.co.uk
over 5 years ago
Preview
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141

Critical Care Study Guide

Critical care medicine is a dynamic and exciting arena where complex pathophysiologic states require extensive knowledge and up-to-date clinical information. An extensive kno- edge of basic pathophysiology, as well as awareness of the appropriate diagnostic tests and treatments that are used to optimize care in the critically ill is essential. Since our frst edition 7 years ago, new information crucial to the care and understanding of the critically ill patient has rapidly accumulated. Because this knowledge base crosses many different disciplines, a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach presenting the information is essential, similar to the multidisciplinary approach that is used to care for the critically ill patient. We have strived to provide this content in an easily digestible format that uses a variety of teaching tools to facilitate understanding of the presented concepts and to enhance information retention. To meet the demand to provide comprehensive and diverse education in order to und- stand the pathogenesis and optimum care of a variety of critical illnesses, we have subst- tially revised the prior topics in the frst edition with updated information. We have also markedly expanded the number of topics covered to include acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome, an expanded discussion of the physiology and operation of mechanical ventilation, obstetrical care in the ICU, neurosurgical emergencies, acute co- nary syndromes, cardiac arrhythmias, role of whole body rehabilitation in the ICU, ethical conduct of human research in the ICU, and nursing care of the ICU patient.  
Google Books
over 5 years ago
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34

Reactive Arthritis. Information about Reactive Arthritis | Patient

Reactive Arthritis is also known as Reiter's syndrome. Reactive arthritis is an autoimmune condition that develops in response to an infection.  
Patient.co.uk
over 5 years ago
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Triple x Syndrome

Are patients suffering from triple x syndrome fertile or infertile??  
komal zafar
over 7 years ago
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How could it be possible to get angina from normal coronary arteries in cardiac x syndrome?

Now I'm doing a rotation in cardiology. I've come across about Cardiac X syndrome, but I don't really get what it is. A book said "it is a form of microvascular angina but occurs in normal coronary arteries". Unfortunately, no-where in the book is it explained in depth. So I have a few questions: Is there any proper definition and how to diagnose it? What is the pathophysiology than can explain this syndrome? Does it something related to metabolic x syndrome? Any takers?  
malek ahmad
over 7 years ago
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What is the link between giardiasis and nodular lymphoid hyperplasia?

It is written that with the exception of this particular condition, successful treatment of giardiasis with immunodeficiency syndromes would result in symptomatic cure and amelioration of mucosal abnormalities. (Diagnostic Medical Parasitology - 2nd Edition, page 34)  
Rama Raja
over 7 years ago
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buddchiari and hepatovenoocclusive syndrome ?

whata the difference between budchiari and hepatovenoocclusive syndrome ? whats the etiological factors . and what are investigations?  
sampath kumar
about 7 years ago
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Guyon's canal syndrome - tingling in hand?

The same question as with carpal tunnel syndrome. Are only the fingers (the pinky and adjacent half of the ring finger) affected or also the related part of the hand? Acoording to my research until now, there can be paresthesia in the pinky side of the hand but only about halfway toward the wrist. Most other pictures show altered sensitivity beyond the wrist.  
Jan Modric
over 6 years ago
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Reefeeding syndrome

Apart from the deranged phosphate and other electrolytes, How would you recognise someone in reefeeding syndrome? Do they present a clinical phenotype?  
Dr David Zebedee
over 6 years ago
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17920

My transition from medical student to patient

I started medical school in 2007 wanting to 'making people better'. I stopped medical school in 2010 facing the reality of not being able to get better myself, being ill and later to be diagnosed with several long term health conditions. This post is about my transition from being a medical student, to the other side - being a patient. There are many things I wish I knew about long-term health conditions and patients when I was a medical student. I hope that through this post, current medical students can become aware of some of theses things and put them into practice as doctors themselves. I went to medical school because I wanted to help people and make them better. I admired doctors up on their pedestals for their knowledge and skills and expertise to 'fix things'. The hardest thing for me was accepting that doctors can't always make people better - they couldn't make me better. Holding doctors so highly meant it was very difficult for me to accept their limitations when it came to incurable long-term conditions and then to accept that as a patient I had capacity myself to help my conditions and situation. Having studied medicine at a very academic university, I had a very strict perception of knowledge. Knowledge was hard and fast medical facts that were taught in a formal setting. I worked all day and night learning the anatomical names for all the muscles in the eye, the cranial nerves and citric acid cycle, not to mention the pharmacology in second year. Being immersed in that academic scientific environment, I correlated expertise with PhDs and papers. It was a real challenge to realise that knowledge doesn't always have to be acquired through a formal educational but that it can be acquired through experience. Importantly, knowledge acquired through experience is equally valid! This means the knowledge my clinicians have developed through studying and working is as valid as my knowledge of my conditions, symptoms and triggers, developed through experiencing it day in day out. I used to feel cross about 'expert patients' - I have spent all these hours in a library learning the biochemistry and pharmacology and 'Joe Bloggs' walks in and knows it all! That wasn't the right attitude, and wasn't fair on patients. As an expert patient myself now, I have come to understood that we are experts through different means, and in different fields. My clinicians remain experts in the biological aspects on disease, but that's not the full picture. I am an expert in the psychological and social impact of my conditions. All aspects need to be taken into account if I am going to have holistic integrated care - the biopsychosocial model in practice - and that's where shared-decision making comes in. The other concept which is has been shattered since making the transition from medical student to patient is that of routine. In my first rotation, orthopaedics and rheumatology, I lost track within the first week of how many outpatient appointments I sat in on. I didn't really think anything of them - they are just another 15 minute slot of time filled with learning in a very busy day. As a patient, my perspective couldn't be more different. I have one appointment with my consultant a year, and spend weeks planning and preparing, then a month recovering emotionally. Earlier this year I wrote a whole post just about this - The Anatomy of an Appointment. Appointments are routine for you - they are not for us! The concept of routine applies to symptoms too. After my first relapse, I had an emergency appointment with my consultant, and presented with very blurred vision and almost total loss of movement in my hands. That very fact I had requested an urgent appointment suggest how worried I was. My consultants response in the appointment was "there is nothing alarming about your symptoms". I fully appreciate that my symptoms may not have meant I was going to drop dead there and then, and that in comparison to his patients in ICU, I was not as serious. But loosing vision and all use of ones hands at the age of 23 (or any age for that matter) is alarming in my books! I guess he was trying to reassure me, but it didn't come across like that! I have a Chiari malformation (in addition to Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome and Elhers-Danlos Syndrome) and have been referred to a neurosurgeon to discuss the possibility of neurosurgery. It is stating the obvious to say that for a neurosurgeon, brain surgery is routine - it's their job! For me, the prospect of even being referred to a neurosurgeon was terrifying, before I even got to the stage of discussing the operation. It is not a routine experience at all! At the moment, surgery is not needed (phew!) but the initial experience of this contact with neurosurgeons illustrates the concept of routines and how much our perspectives differ. As someone with three quite rare and complex conditions, I am invariable met in A&E with comments like "you are so interesting!". I remember sitting in the hospital cafeteria at lunch as a student and literally feasting on the 'fascinating' cases we had seen on upstairs on the wards that morning. "oh you must go and see that really interesting patient with X, Y and Z!" I am so thankful that you all find medicine so interesting - you need that passion and fascination to help you with the ongoing learning and drive to be a doctor. I found it fascinating too! But I no longer find neurology that interesting - it is too close to home. Nothing is "interesting" if you live with it day in day out. No matter what funky things my autonomic nervous may be doing, there is nothing interesting or fascinating about temporary paralysis, headaches and the day to day grind of my symptoms. This post was inspired by NHS Change Day (13th March 2013) - as a patient, I wanted to share these few things with medical students, what I wish I knew when I was where you are now, to help the next generation of doctors become the very best doctors they can. I wish you all the very best for the rest of your studies, and thank you very much for reading! Anya de Iongh www.thepatientpatient2011.blogspot.co.uk @anyadei  
Anya de Iongh
about 7 years ago