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Compartment Syndrome

This is a syndrome that results from swelling of a muscle. The muscle is retained in its fixed volume fascia, however, and thus the swelling of the muscle causes occlusion of the blood supply. this can result in infarction, and can cause an ischaemic contraction known as Volkmann’s Ischaemic Contracture.   It typically occurs in the forearm and calf, but can also occur in the thigh and foot.    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
46

A man with a mass in the thigh

A 54 year old man presented to his general practitioner because of a fullness in his left lateral thigh that he first noticed while playing golf, although it was not related to an identifiable injury. He had a history of hypertension and fibromyalgia and was taking atenolol, ramipril, pregabalin, and tramadol but was otherwise well. The GP thought that the swelling was caused by a muscular injury, but the patient re-presented four months later because the mass had grown from a small bump to a swelling of 8 cm in diameter. It was also beginning to cause some knee stiffness but no pain. On examination he had a large firm swelling in his lateral thigh. On this occasion his GP referred him on a two week wait to the regional plastic surgery department. An ultrasound scan showed a 6 × 8 cm intramuscular mass with cystic changes and patchy neovascularity, but no inguinal or pelvic lymphadenopathy. Ultrasonography was followed by magnetic resonance imaging, with and without gadolinium contrast (fig 1⇓).  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
53

A man with a mass in the thigh

A 54 year old man presented to his general practitioner because of a fullness in his left lateral thigh that he first noticed while playing golf, although it was not related to an identifiable injury. He had a history of hypertension and fibromyalgia and was taking atenolol, ramipril, pregabalin, and tramadol but was otherwise well. The GP thought that the swelling was caused by a muscular injury, but the patient re-presented four months later because the mass had grown from a small bump to a swelling of 8 cm in diameter. It was also beginning to cause some knee stiffness but no pain. On examination he had a large firm swelling in his lateral thigh. On this occasion his GP referred him on a two week wait to the regional plastic surgery department. An ultrasound scan showed a 6 × 8 cm intramuscular mass with cystic changes and patchy neovascularity, but no inguinal or pelvic lymphadenopathy. Ultrasonography was followed by magnetic resonance imaging, with and without gadolinium contrast (fig 1⇓).  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
45

A man with a mass in the thigh

A 54 year old man presented to his general practitioner because of a fullness in his left lateral thigh that he first noticed while playing golf, although it was not related to an identifiable injury. He had a history of hypertension and fibromyalgia and was taking atenolol, ramipril, pregabalin, and tramadol but was otherwise well. The GP thought that the swelling was caused by a muscular injury, but the patient re-presented four months later because the mass had grown from a small bump to a swelling of 8 cm in diameter. It was also beginning to cause some knee stiffness but no pain. On examination he had a large firm swelling in his lateral thigh. On this occasion his GP referred him on a two week wait to the regional plastic surgery department. An ultrasound scan showed a 6 × 8 cm intramuscular mass with cystic changes and patchy neovascularity, but no inguinal or pelvic lymphadenopathy. Ultrasonography was followed by magnetic resonance imaging, with and without gadolinium contrast (fig 1⇓).  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
38

A man with tingling fingers

A 73 year old man with a three month history of bilateral persistent tingling in the index and middle fingers presented to his general practitioner. He was referred for an injection for suspected carpal tunnel syndrome. When he attended, as well as the tingling sensation, he described loss of fine motor function in his hands, with altered sensation in both legs and his inner thighs. Examination at this time showed no objective sensory loss in either hand. Phalen’s test and Tinel’s test were both negative. His upper limb tendon reflexes were normal.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
49

A man with a mass in the thigh

A 54 year old man presented to his general practitioner because of a fullness in his left lateral thigh that he first noticed while playing golf, although it was not related to an identifiable injury. He had a history of hypertension and fibromyalgia and was taking atenolol, ramipril, pregabalin, and tramadol but was otherwise well. The GP thought that the swelling was caused by a muscular injury, but the patient re-presented four months later because the mass had grown from a small bump to a swelling of 8 cm in diameter. It was also beginning to cause some knee stiffness but no pain. On examination he had a large firm swelling in his lateral thigh. On this occasion his GP referred him on a two week wait to the regional plastic surgery department. An ultrasound scan showed a 6 × 8 cm intramuscular mass with cystic changes and patchy neovascularity, but no inguinal or pelvic lymphadenopathy. Ultrasonography was followed by magnetic resonance imaging, with and without gadolinium contrast (fig 1⇓).  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
2
56

A man with a mass in the thigh

A 54 year old man presented to his general practitioner because of a fullness in his left lateral thigh that he first noticed while playing golf, although it was not related to an identifiable injury. He had a history of hypertension and fibromyalgia and was taking atenolol, ramipril, pregabalin, and tramadol but was otherwise well. The GP thought that the swelling was caused by a muscular injury, but the patient re-presented four months later because the mass had grown from a small bump to a swelling of 8 cm in diameter. It was also beginning to cause some knee stiffness but no pain. On examination he had a large firm swelling in his lateral thigh. On this occasion his GP referred him on a two week wait to the regional plastic surgery department. An ultrasound scan showed a 6 × 8 cm intramuscular mass with cystic changes and patchy neovascularity, but no inguinal or pelvic lymphadenopathy. Ultrasonography was followed by magnetic resonance imaging, with and without gadolinium contrast (fig 1⇓).  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
37

A man with a mass in the thigh

A 54 year old man presented to his general practitioner because of a fullness in his left lateral thigh that he first noticed while playing golf, although it was not related to an identifiable injury. He had a history of hypertension and fibromyalgia and was taking atenolol, ramipril, pregabalin, and tramadol but was otherwise well. The GP thought that the swelling was caused by a muscular injury, but the patient re-presented four months later because the mass had grown from a small bump to a swelling of 8 cm in diameter. It was also beginning to cause some knee stiffness but no pain. On examination he had a large firm swelling in his lateral thigh. On this occasion his GP referred him on a two week wait to the regional plastic surgery department. An ultrasound scan showed a 6 × 8 cm intramuscular mass with cystic changes and patchy neovascularity, but no inguinal or pelvic lymphadenopathy. Ultrasonography was followed by magnetic resonance imaging, with and without gadolinium contrast (fig 1⇓).  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
41

A man with a mass in the thigh

A 54 year old man presented to his general practitioner because of a fullness in his left lateral thigh that he first noticed while playing golf, although it was not related to an identifiable injury. He had a history of hypertension and fibromyalgia and was taking atenolol, ramipril, pregabalin, and tramadol but was otherwise well. The GP thought that the swelling was caused by a muscular injury, but the patient re-presented four months later because the mass had grown from a small bump to a swelling of 8 cm in diameter. It was also beginning to cause some knee stiffness but no pain. On examination he had a large firm swelling in his lateral thigh. On this occasion his GP referred him on a two week wait to the regional plastic surgery department. An ultrasound scan showed a 6 × 8 cm intramuscular mass with cystic changes and patchy neovascularity, but no inguinal or pelvic lymphadenopathy. Ultrasonography was followed by magnetic resonance imaging, with and without gadolinium contrast (fig 1⇓).  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
32

An adolescent athlete with groin pain

A 14 year old boy felt a mild aching discomfort in his left groin while playing rugby but still continued to play. He subsequently tackled an opponent and developed a severe pain of sudden onset in the left upper thigh and groin. A “snapping” sound was heard and he fell to the ground. He was unable to bear weight on the left leg and appeared pale, clammy, and nauseated. His pitch-side vital observations were normal and he was offered combined gaseous nitrous oxide and oxygen for pain relief. Ice was applied to the area of maximum discomfort and he was accompanied to the emergency department in an ambulance. At the emergency department he was advised that he had probably “strained” a muscle and was given conservative advice. He was discharged with crutches and analgesia.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
35

An adolescent athlete with groin pain

A 14 year old boy felt a mild aching discomfort in his left groin while playing rugby but still continued to play. He subsequently tackled an opponent and developed a severe pain of sudden onset in the left upper thigh and groin. A “snapping” sound was heard and he fell to the ground. He was unable to bear weight on the left leg and appeared pale, clammy, and nauseated. His pitch-side vital observations were normal and he was offered combined gaseous nitrous oxide and oxygen for pain relief. Ice was applied to the area of maximum discomfort and he was accompanied to the emergency department in an ambulance. At the emergency department he was advised that he had probably “strained” a muscle and was given conservative advice. He was discharged with crutches and analgesia.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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1
89

Meralgia Paresthetica - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Educational video describing Meralgia Paresthetica of the thigh. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https:...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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1
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Posterior Cutaneous Nerve Of The Thigh - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Educational video describing the posterior cutaneous nerve of the thigh.. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitte...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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1
32

ANATOMY; MUSCLES OF THE PERINEUM & THIGH by Professor Fink

This is Part 4 of 5 Video Lectures on the Skeletal Muscle Groups of the Human Body by Professor Fink. In this Video Lecture, Professor Fink first describes t...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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1
30

Internal medicine on Instagram: “Skin lesions in Henoch-Schönlein purpura (IgA vasculitis) Clusters of palpable, pruritic lesions on the thigh of a patient with Henoch-…”

“Skin lesions in Henoch-Schönlein purpura (IgA vasculitis) Clusters of palpable, pruritic lesions on the thigh of a patient with Henoch-Schönlein purpura…”  
Instagram
over 5 years ago
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1
22

ANATOMY; MUSCLES OF THE PERINEUM & THIGH by Professor Fink

This is Part 4 of 5 Video Lectures on the Skeletal Muscle Groups of the Human Body by Professor Fink. In this Video Lecture, Professor Fink first describes t...  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
24

“It’s just a muscle sprain”

A 10 year old boy presented to his general practitioner with a four week history of left mid-thigh pain with no associated history of systemic symptoms. He had no memory of a preceding trauma and no history of infection, locally or systemically. The pain was relapsing and remitting in its extent and frequency. It was also activity related, with occasional night waking and pain at rest. His GP took a full history, conducted a complete hip examination, and at initial presentation decided that the pain was caused by a muscle sprain.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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1
22

A rash in a patient with neutropenia

A 72 year old man with relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia developed a rash seven days after starting a combined chemotherapy regimen (fludarabine, cytarabine, granulocyte colony stimulating factor, and idarubicin). He first noticed a painful lesion on his left forefoot, and over the next seven days he developed similar lesions on the left lower limb (fig 1⇓), right thigh, and face. He was referred for a dermatological opinion on day 14.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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1
26

Femoral Triangle - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Educational video describing the Femoral Triangle of the Thigh. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https:/...  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
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1
99

Anatomy Atlases: Atlas of Human Anatomy in Cross Section: Section 6. Pelvis, Perineum, Hip, and Upper Thigh: Male

Ronald A. Bergman, Ph.D., Adel K. Afifi, M.D., Jean J. Jew, M.D., and Paul C. Reimann, B.S. Peer Review Status: Externally Peer Reviewed  
anatomyatlases.org
over 4 years ago