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ThoracicSurgery

Category

9
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Expert Round Table with Drs. Anne Tsao and Alex Farivar: Case Discussion on Isolated Brain Metastasis (audio)

<p><span style="font-family: arial, sans, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; white-space: pre-wrap;">Case discussion with Dr. Anne Tsao of medical oncology at MD Anderson, and Dr. Alex Farivar of thoracic surgery at Swedish Cancer Institute, on a case of man with an isolated brain metastasis being considered for curative therapy.</span></p>  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 9 years ago
10
1
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Expert Round Table with Drs. Anne Tsao and Alex Farivar: Case Discussion on Isolated Brain Metastasis (video)

<p><span style="font-family: arial, sans, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; white-space: pre-wrap;">Case discussion with Dr. Anne Tsao of medical oncology at MD Anderson, and Dr. Alex Farivar of thoracic surgery at Swedish Cancer Institute, on a case of man with an isolated brain metastasis being considered for curative therapy.</span></p>  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 9 years ago
1
1
46

Expert Round Table with Drs. Anne Tsao and Alex Farivar: Case Discussion on Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (audio)

<p><span style="font-family: arial, sans, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; white-space: pre-wrap;">Case discussion with Dr. Anne Tsao of medical oncology at MD Anderson, and Dr. Alex Farivar of thoracic surgery at Swedish Cancer Institute, on a case of a relatively fit man with malignant pleural mesothelioma.</span></p>  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 9 years ago
2
1
34

Expert Round Table with Drs. Anne Tsao and Alex Farivar: Case Discussion on Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (video)

<p><span style="font-family: arial, sans, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; white-space: pre-wrap;">Case discussion with Dr. Anne Tsao of medical oncology at MD Anderson, and Dr. Alex Farivar of thoracic surgery at Swedish Cancer Institute, on a case of a relatively fit man with malignant pleural mesothelioma.</span></p>  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 9 years ago
5
1
45

Expert Round Table with Drs. Anne Tsao and Alex Farivar: Case Discussion on Indolent BornchioloAlveolar Carcinoma (BAC) (audio)

<p><span style="font-family: arial, sans, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; white-space: pre-wrap;">Case discussion of management options for an elderly man with slowly progressing BAC, with Dr. Anne Tsao of medical oncology at MD Anderson, and Dr. Alex Farivar of thoracic surgery at Swedish Cancer Institute.</span></p>  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 9 years ago
6
1
63

Expert Round Table with Drs. Anne Tsao and Alex Farivar: Case Discussion on Indolent Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma (BAC) (video)

<p><span style="font-family: arial, sans, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; white-space: pre-wrap;">Case discussion of management options for an elderly man with slowly progressing BAC, with Dr. Anne Tsao of medical oncology at MD Anderson, and Dr. Alex Farivar of thoracic surgery at Swedish Cancer Institute.</span></p>  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 9 years ago
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Cardiology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cardiology (from Greek καρδίᾱ kardiā, "heart" and -λογία -logia, "study") is a branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the heart. The field includes medical diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart defects, coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease and electrophysiology. Physicians who specialize in this field of medicine are called cardiologists, a specialty of internal medicine. Pediatric cardiologists are pediatricians who specialize in cardiology. Physicians who specialize in cardiac surgery are called cardiothoracic surgeons or cardiac surgeons, a specialty of general surgery.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 5 years ago
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25

Leeds General Infirmary child heart surgery unit 'safe' - BBC News

A children's heart unit that closed temporarily owing to fears over numbers of deaths is safe, but some families received poor care, a review finds.  
BBC News
over 5 years ago
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Northern Ireland MLAs want clarity on child cardiac surgery cases - BBC News

Members of NI's Health Committee are calling for greater clarity on details of cases of children travelling to Dublin for life-saving heart surgery.  
BBC News
over 5 years ago
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Neuroprotection in cardiac surgery

Description  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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1
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Neuroprotection in cardiac surgery

Description  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
2
1
36

An Introduction to Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO)

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) is a form of partial cardiopulmonary bypass used for long-term support of respiratory and/or cardiac function. This technology arose from cardiopulmonary bypass used for cardiac surgery. Initial systems used bubble oxygenators which were poorly suited for prolonged use because of their tendency to hemolyze blood. Membrane oxygenators made long-term use of ECMO possible. The first report of successful ECMO support of an adult was published by Hill in 1972.  
perfusion.com
over 4 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 estj3l?1444774164
5
224

Points mean Prizes (and jobs)

Thousands of doctors are currently preparing portfolios and stressing about situational judgements as they go into core and specialty training interviews. As a medical student I wasn’t even aware when these interviews were and had only the briefest imaginings of what they might entail. Even at finals, specialty applications felt a million miles away; but it’s as if you’ve only just got through the misery of MTAS and you’re suddenly an F2 realising that the last 15 months have, to your surprise, disappeared. Yes, the interview is certainly a stressful situation, and for many medics it’s only the second ‘proper’ interview they’ve ever had. Time pressures, the scope of stations and performing under the watchful eye of the great and good of the medical profession only add to the stress. But, there are ways to make this process bearable, and, dare I say it, enjoyable (kind of). The most important step is preparation. Not just the preparation that starts in the days to weeks before the interview; this should be for refining your skills, getting your answers super-slick and getting to know yourself inside-out. Preparation starts at university (and no, which school you’re in doesn’t make a single difference). What the interviewers are looking for can be found in the person specification unique to each specialty (found at http://bit.ly/1eWF6aN). I.e. if you know you were born to perform heart surgery, start looking at what the interviewers for cardiothoracics are looking for. Even if you’re completely confused about your career path, it’s time to start thinking. Many specialties still have a short-listing stage dependent on the application form. Whether assessed on the form or at interview each specialty will (generally) award points for other/higher degrees, publications, presentations, prizes, teaching experience, audit and ‘commitment to specialty’. At the CT1/ST1 stage it doesn’t matter what subject area you published/presented/taught in etc. to score in that section; but having something relevant will help you discuss your commitment to that specialty. ‘Relevant’ in itself is misleading however; every experience is likely to be relevant when you identify the transferable skills involved and what you learned from the experience. Some specialties are stricter and you’ll need demonstrable evidence that you haven’t just applied on a whim. These tend to be the more competitive specialties which demand evidence you’ve had a really good look at what the job involves and have taken steps to broaden your knowledge. There is typically also at least one skills station which may be general (e.g. breaking bad news to a patient) or specialty-specific (e.g. interpreting images for radiology) but are still based on applicants demonstrating they fit the person specification. Many of the mark schemes are also freely available on the relevant Royal College website, and I encourage you to have a look and see where you could get a few more points (or give yourself a pat on the back that you couldn’t). It’s unlikely that the mark scheme/person spec. will be exactly the same every year, but the general overview is enduring. NB. The GP application is a bit different, but that’s for another post. The take home message is get involved early on, and be involved consistently. It may eat up some of your free time but you’ll appreciate it as soon as you look at the application form. If you’re struggling for practical ideas, take a look at the Royal College and specialty trainee websites for inspiration (some, for example the Royal College of Radiologists, have great audit ideas). The RSM and each medical school have a list of available prize essays and exams. A wise person once said to me “there’s no such thing as a wasted conversation”: Speaking to trainees and consultants about how they got to where they are not only gives you great insight into what they do but being friendly and enthusiastic can open up doors for you to help in audits and publications. And the final tip? Write everything down. Not only will this stand you in good stead as a safe doctor, but you’ll be surprised how much you can forget in a very short time. Then, unlike me, you won’t have to spend ages trying to think of reasonable examples of ‘when I dealt with stress’. Written by Lydia Spurr, FY3 Doctor Lydia is a Resident Meducation Blogger  
Dr Lydia Spurr
almost 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 rx9yc2?1444774277
7
140

Early Retirement and Career Change

This is my first blog on Meducation. I decided to tell the reader a bit about myself, so that future blogs will make sense. At age 48 and in an active and successful academic practice of OB & GYN, my best friend died from a complication of cardiac surgery. This tragic event made my wife's and me consider other things in life than just work, thus at age 55, I decided to retire from my academic position and to start working as a locum in many different cultural settings. The plan was to work somewhere in an area of need for six months and alternate this with travel for six months. It did not quite work out exactly that way, but close enough. I worked in Japan, then Pakistan, Tasmania, Australia, New Zealand, Alaska, St Lucia, and Chiapas in Mexico. Much earlier I had had a two year experience in Africa. It was a very satisfying experience and my wife and I have never looked back. Many of my friends and colleagues kept urging me to write a book about our experiences and how we accomplished them. For a long time I kept resisting, probably because I felt that no one might be interested, and because I might have been lazy, and most likely for both of these reasons. I finally gave in, started writing and published an e book. The title is "Crosscultural Doctoring. On and Off the Beaten Path." the book can be down loaded for free from Smashwords at: http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/161522 The book is meant for medical as well as non medical people. It is written as a series of loosely connected anecdotes, some medical, some non medical, some funny, some not so funny. The book describes the immense satisfaction my wife and I experienced from our decision and I hope that reading the book might inspire others, medical or non medical people, who might be thinking about a career change or early retirement to jump of the beaten path. The book might also inspire other with similar experiences to write about them. I would love to receive some comments. William J. LeMaire JUNE 2014 Learn more about me please visit my website at: http://www.freewebs.com/wimsbook  
DR William LeMaire
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
0
12

UK death rates in children’s heart surgery have almost halved over past decade

More children survived for at least 30 days after heart surgery at the end of the past decade than at the start, an analysis has found. The death rate fell from 4.3% to 2.6% of cases.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Protecting heart surgery patients' kidney health with high-dose statin

Acute kidney injury often arises after major surgery because the kidneys can be deprived of normal blood flow during the procedure.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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UK death rates for children's heart surgery have almost halved over past decade

Deaths within 30 days of children's heart surgery have almost halved in the UK over the past decade, despite a rise in the number and complexity of cases during that period, reveals an...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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Older Donated Blood Safe for Heart Surgery Patients, Study Finds - MedicineNet

For patients undergoing heart surgery, using transfused red blood cells stored for 21 days or more is as good as using blood cells stored for 10 days or less, a new study finds.  
medicinenet.com
over 4 years ago