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261

Haemothorax

This image displays a large left sided haemothorax with mediastinal displacement to the opposite side. Clinically the patient would be in respiratory distress - percussion of the left side of the chest would be dull and breath sounds and vocal resonance would be reduced. A Haemothorax such as this falls into the category of life threatening chest injuries (ATOMFC) and requires emergent treatment using a chest drain in the 5th intercostal space, mid-axillary line and treatment according to ALS or ATLS protocols. ATOMFC = A = airway obstruction, T = tension pneumothorax, O = open pneumothorax, M = massive haemothorax, F = flail chest, C = cardiac tamponade.  
Rhys Clement
almost 10 years ago
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4
172

Chest X-ray

Note the calcified granuloma in the right upper zone (an important differential being malignancy). Note also the left lower lobe collapse ('sail sign' behind the heart). If you look closely you will see the abscence of the lower ribs leading you to the conclusion that the patient has, at some point, undergone a thoracotomy. You can also see surgical clips in the stomach.  
Tim Ritzmann
almost 10 years ago
30177
4
100

Chest Examination

This chest examination video is part of the MedPrep tutorial video series: http://www.medprep.in/clinical-examination-videos.php which has received 20,000+ views on Youtube. The videos are designed to be concise and engaging, at times with humour. I hope you enjoy viewing them and find them useful.  
Soton
over 7 years ago
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208

Chest and Abdomen Radiology

Radiology Teaching 19/11/12 – 23/11/12  
Aoibhin McGarrity
over 6 years ago
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57

Side-effects of radiotherapy

Side-effects of radiotherapy Common acute side-effects  Reddening and soreness of the skin  Discomfort and swelling of breast or chest area  Fatigue Common …  
Stephen McAleer
over 6 years ago
5
4
68

ECG Interpretation - Predicted Normal ECG - Chest Leads

Using the basic principles outlined in our previous videos we can easily predict the morphology of the ECG read-out in the 6 chest leads. http://www.acadoodle.com Acadoodle.com is a web resource that provides Videos and Interactive Games to teach the complex nature of ECG / EKG. 3D reconstructions and informative 2D animations provide the ideal learning environment for this field. For more videos and interactive games, visit Acadoodle.com Information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.  
ECG Teacher
over 5 years ago
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4
228

Chest X-Ray Basics in 5 min

The basics of the chest x-ray in 5 minutes by Dr Kate Henderson, Specialist Trainee in Anaesthesia and Education Fellow at Manchester Royal Infirmary  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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4
304

How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 3 - Assessing Technical Quality)

A discussion of how to assess the technical quality of a chest x-ray, including assessment of rotation, adequacy of inspiration, and adequacy of exposure/pen...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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4
256

Questions on the surface anatomy of the thorax

This video is part of a playlist of short videos which are intended to combine multiple choice questions' answering experience with an improved understanding...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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3
356

Cases in Radiology: Episode 3 (pediatric, chest x-ray)

In this episode we take a look at a basic but important paediatric chest radiograph case with a practical discussion of management and follow-up. View the case in Radopaedia quiz mode here: http://goo.gl/u65js  
Radiopaedia
over 6 years ago
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3
132

How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 8 - Focal Lung Processes)

A discussion of how to identify, localize, and describe pneumonia, as well as pulmonary nodules and lung cavities. Signs of a pulmonary embolism are reviewed...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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3
291

How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 7 - Diffuse Lung Processes)

An explanation of alveolar vs. interstitial opacities, including cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and the 3 types of interstitial patterns (r...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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3
131

How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 6 - Diaphragm and Pleura)

A review of how to diagnose a pneumothorax, various forms of pleural effusion, other forms of pleural disease, and pneumoperitoneum. A differential diagnosis...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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3
243

How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 4 - Airways, Bones, and Soft Tissues)

An overview of how to assess the airways, bones, and soft tissues on chest X-ray, including the important etiologies of common radiographic abnormalities. Vi...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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136

How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 10 - Self Assessment): Part 2

Part 2 of 2 of a facilitated self-assessment on the interpretation of chest x-rays. Sources for images may include Wikimedia Commons, radiologypics.com, and ...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1i9rgu8?1444773940
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220

The elephant in the room: Is everything you see on an x-ray relevant?

Recent 'tongue in cheek' research which has been reported in a Washington Post blog recently has caused a lot of questions to be raised concerning inattention blindness, which could cause concern unless you understand the underlying psychology. Here's a CT scan: During psychology lectures at Med School, you may have encountered the basketball bouncing students in front of a bank of elevators where you were asked to count the number of passes the basketball made from the player wearing the white T shirt, while a gorilla ran between the students. (Even if you did watch it before, you can re-watch the video on the Washington Post blog). The recent study asked radiologists to identify and count how many nodules are present in the lungs on a regular CT thorax. If you look at the image you may see a gorilla waving his arms about. As a radiologist, I see the anatomy in the background, the chambers of the heart and mediastinum, but nothing there out of the ordinary. As radiologists, we are looking for pathology, but also report pathological findings that are unexpected. The clinical history of a patient is very important for us in interpretation of imaging examinations, as we need to answer the question you are asking, but have to be careful we do not miss anything else of serious import. As we do not see any other pathology, we would not expect to find a gorilla in the chest, so our brains can pass over distracting findings. The other psychological issue is the satisfaction of search, where we can see the expected pathology, but may miss the other cancer if we do not carefully and systematically look through the images. So the main thing to learn from this is that your training should always keep you alert, not just to expected happening, but to not discount the unexpected, then many lives will be saved as a result of your attention to detail.  
Chris Flowers
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1lz2a7y?1444773942
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836

Integrated system-based medical education vs discipline-based medical education

I am an Anatomy Professor who has taught anatomy to the medical school students in discipline based medical education system for first 10years of academic life. When I started teaching Anatomy in system-based medical education in the later half of my academic life I was surprised to find out that my students in system-based education can retain a lot of anatomy knowledge as they can visualize the application of the contents in the pathology, clinical science contents, PBL triggers and clinical skills sessions. Surprisingly, medical schools in India still follow the discipline-based medical education. Mostly the students are forced to retain the factual knowledge of Anatomy in this system. When they are in Year 1,they study only Anatomy,Physiology and Biochemistry. Hence it is very difficult for the student to imagine the application of the knowledge of Anatomy learnt in lecture or dissection room. For example, the students in discipline-based system learn the gross anatomy of the sternum and anterior thoracic wall. They need to memorize the importance of sternal angle without visualizing it as they are still not practising palpation of anterior thoracic wall for apex beat. I know that they learn it provided they are lucky to get a tutor who is a medical doctor, who obviously takes them to the task of palpating intercostal space through palpation of sternal angle in skeleton or over their own body surface marking. But the lack of Clinical skills practice in traditional discipline based medical education in year 1 does not allow the student to apply their anatomy knowledge automatically. Dr Nilesh Mitra  
Nilesh Kumar Mitra
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 zpmqsc?1444774026
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3772

Assessing Types of Burns and their Severity

This is an excerpt from "Wound Care Made Incredibly Easy! 1st UK Edition" by Julie Vuolo For more information, or to purchase your copy, visit: http://tiny.cc/woundcare. Save 15% (and get free P&P) on this, and a whole host of other LWW titles at http://lww.co.uk when you use the code MEDUCATION when you check out! Introduction A burn is an acute wound caused by exposure to thermal extremes, electricity, caustic chemicals or radiation. The degree of tissue damage caused by a burn depends on the strength of the source and the duration of contact or exposure. Around 250,000 people per year sustain burn injuries in the UK (NBCRC 2001). Because of the specialist care burns require, they are considered here separately from other traumatic wounds. Types of burns Burns can be classified by cause or type. Knowing the type of burn will help you to plan the right care for your patient. Thermal burns The most common type of burn, thermal burns can result from virtually any misuse or mishandling of fire, combustible products, hot fluids and fat or coming into contact with a hot object. Playing with matches, pouring petrol onto a BBQ, spilling hot coffee, touching hot hair straighteners and setting off fireworks are some common examples of ways in which burns occur. Thermal burns can also result from kitchen accidents, house or office fires, car accidents or physical abuse. Although it’s less common, exposure to extreme cold can also cause thermal burns. Electrical burns Electrical burns result from contact with flowing electrical current. Household current, high-voltage transmission lines and lightning are sources of electrical burns. Internal injury is often considerably greater than is apparent externally. Chemical burns Chemical burns most commonly result from contact (skin contact or inhalation) with a caustic agent, such as an acid, an alkali or a vesicant. Radiation burns The most common radiation burn is sunburn, which follows excessive exposure to the sun. Almost all other burns due to radiation exposure occur as a result of radiation treatment or in specific industries that use or process radioactive materials. Assessment Conduct your initial assessment as soon as possible after the burn occurs. First, assess the patient’s ABCs. Then determine the patient’s level of consciousness and mobility. Next, assess the burn, including its size, depth and complexity. Determining size Determine burn size as part of your initial assessment. Typically, burn size is expressed as a percentage of total body surface area (TBSA). The Rule of Nines and the Lund–Browder Classification provide standardised and quick estimates of the percentage of TBSA affected. Memory Jogger To remember the proper sequence for the initial assessment of a burns patient, remember your ABCs and add D and E. Airway – Assess the patient’s airway, remove any obstruction and treat any obstructive condition. Breathing – Observe the motion of the patient’s chest. Auscultate the depth, rate and characteristics of the patient’s breathing. Circulation – Palpate the patient’s pulse at the carotid artery and then at the distal pulse points in the wrist, posterior tibial area and foot. Loss of distal pulse may indicate shock or constriction of an extremity. Disability – Assess the patient’s level of consciousness and ability to function before attempting to move or transfer them. Expose – Remove burned clothing from burned areas of the patient’s body and thoroughly examine the skin beneath.  
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
over 6 years ago
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3
198

Gross Anatomy - Autonomic Nervous System - Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Pathways of the Body

Starting in the spinal cord, this video takes you step-by-step through the sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways related to the organs of the thorax, abdo...  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago