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Www.bmj
1
22

A man with fever, a productive cough, and a striking chest radiograph

A 41 year old man presented to the emergency department with a two week history of worsening shortness of breath. Associated symptoms included a cough productive of green sputum, intermittent fevers, night sweats, and non-pleuritic pain in the right side of the chest wall. He had a history of chronic pancreatitis secondary to alcohol excess, which was complicated by diet controlled type 2 diabetes. He also smoked 40 cigarettes a day.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
19

A man with fever, a productive cough, and a striking chest radiograph

A 41 year old man presented to the emergency department with a two week history of worsening shortness of breath. Associated symptoms included a cough productive of green sputum, intermittent fevers, night sweats, and non-pleuritic pain in the right side of the chest wall. He had a history of chronic pancreatitis secondary to alcohol excess, which was complicated by diet controlled type 2 diabetes. He also smoked 40 cigarettes a day.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
25

A man with fever, a productive cough, and a striking chest radiograph

A 41 year old man presented to the emergency department with a two week history of worsening shortness of breath. Associated symptoms included a cough productive of green sputum, intermittent fevers, night sweats, and non-pleuritic pain in the right side of the chest wall. He had a history of chronic pancreatitis secondary to alcohol excess, which was complicated by diet controlled type 2 diabetes. He also smoked 40 cigarettes a day.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
12

A man with fever, a productive cough, and a striking chest radiograph

A 41 year old man presented to the emergency department with a two week history of worsening shortness of breath. Associated symptoms included a cough productive of green sputum, intermittent fevers, night sweats, and non-pleuritic pain in the right side of the chest wall. He had a history of chronic pancreatitis secondary to alcohol excess, which was complicated by diet controlled type 2 diabetes. He also smoked 40 cigarettes a day.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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1
58

Howard Nicholson obituary

Chest physician who pioneered multidisciplinary care planning  
the Guardian
over 5 years ago
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1
19

Introduction to Adult In-Hospital CPR eLecture

Nick Smith - Advanced Life Support Instructor for the Resuscitation Council (UK) on CPR in the hospital setting This video only covers assessment, chest comp...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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1
20

THE VERTEBRAL COLUMN & RIB CAGE by Professor Fink

In this video, Professor Fink describes the functional structures of the Vertebral Column and Rib Cage. The basic structure of vertebrae is described, includ...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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1
16

Internal medicine on Instagram: “Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: High-resolution, thin-section chest CT scan showing extensive parenchymal involvement with fibrotic and…”

“Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: High-resolution, thin-section chest CT scan showing extensive parenchymal involvement with fibrotic and honeycomb changes…”  
Instagram
over 5 years ago
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1
22

Internal medicine on Instagram: “High resolution computed tomography of the chest in a patient with miliary tuberculosis Numerous 2 mm nodules and septal thickening are…”

“High resolution computed tomography of the chest in a patient with miliary tuberculosis Numerous 2 mm nodules and septal thickening are seen diffusely…”  
Instagram
over 5 years ago
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1
20

Internal medicine on Instagram: “Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: High-resolution, thin-section chest CT scan showing extensive parenchymal involvement with fibrotic and…”

“Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: High-resolution, thin-section chest CT scan showing extensive parenchymal involvement with fibrotic and honeycomb changes…”  
Instagram
over 5 years ago
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1
10

Internal medicine on Instagram: “Aortic coarctation The classical sign in aortic coarctation is notching of the inferior aspects of the ribs (arrow on left). This is due to…”

“Aortic coarctation The classical sign in aortic coarctation is notching of the inferior aspects of the ribs (arrow on left). This is due to hypertrophy of…”  
Instagram
over 5 years ago
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1
50

Wilderness Medical Society Practice Guidelines for Treatment of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia

Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) typically occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity, and is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mEq/L. It is also reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited or often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians.  
sciencedirect.com
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
75

Management and prevention of exacerbations of COPD

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are prone to acute respiratory exacerbations, which can develop suddenly or subacutely over the course of several days. Exacerbations have a detrimental effect on patients’ health status and increase the burden on the healthcare system. Initial treatment is unsuccessful in 24-27% of patients, who have a relapse or a second exacerbation within 30 days of the initial event. No obvious benefit has been seen in recent clinical trials of anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy, anti-leukotriene therapy, intensive chest physiotherapy, or early inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation for treatment of exacerbations. By contrast, clinical trials of prevention rather than acute treatment have shown promising results. Long acting β agonist (LABA) or long acting anti-muscarinic (LAMA) bronchodilators and inhaled corticosteroid-LABA combinations prevent exacerbations in patients at risk, with relative risk reductions averaging 14-27% for each of these drugs relative to placebo. Triple therapy with inhaled corticosteroid-LABA plus LAMA may provide additional benefit, although study results to date are heterogeneous and more studies are needed. Pneumonia is an important complication of treatment with inhaled corticosteroid-LABA products, and the risk of pneumonia seems to be doubled in patients with COPD who use fluticasone. The addition of azithromycin to usual COPD therapy prevents exacerbations, although it may prolong the Q-T interval and increase the risk of death from cardiovascular disease in patients prone to arrhythmia. New potential drugs—including mitogen activated protein kinase inhibitors, phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitors, and monoclonal antibodies to the interleukin 1 receptor—offer additional hope for treatments that may prevent exacerbations in the future.  
bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
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1
7

Introduction to Adult In-Hospital CPR eLecture

Nick Smith - Advanced Life Support Instructor for the Resuscitation Council (UK) on CPR in the hospital setting This video only covers assessment, chest comp...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
Preview
1
14

Pulmonary Function Tests (PFT): Lesson 5 - Summary and Practice Cases

A summary of the first 4 videos in this series on PFT interpretation, as well as 5 practice cases which integrate PFTs with a clinical vignette and chest X-ray.  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
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1
15

How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 10 - Self Assessment): Part 1

A self-assessment of how much material was learned and retained from this course on interpreting chest x-rays, and how well it can be incorporated into the v...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
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1
24

How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 9 - Atelectasis, Lines, Tubes, Devices, and Surgeries)

A summary of how to identify atelectasis (including lobar collapse), identify various lines, tubes, and devices (including proper placement, and complication...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
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1
23

How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 8 - Focal Lung Processes)

A discussion of how to identify, localize, and describe pneumonia, as well as pulmonary nodules and lung cavities. Signs of a pulmonary embolism are reviewed...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
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1
16

How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 7 - Diffuse Lung Processes)

An explanation of alveolar vs. interstitial opacities, including cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and the 3 types of interstitial patterns (r...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago