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21

An unusual case of severe anaemia and lymphocytosis

An 83 year old man was referred to the haematology clinic with a three week history of fatigue and shortness of breath on exertion. His symptoms had progressively worsened and on the day of review he felt breathless at rest. He had noted that he bruised easily over his arms and had recently been admitted for recurrent chest infections that required intravenous antibiotics. He had also lost 5 kg in weight during the past month.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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8

A woman with upper and lower airway symptoms

A 65 year old woman presented with a four week history of lethargy, cough, and feeling generally unwell. She had recently been treated for an ear infection and had occasional epistaxis but had no other medical history. She had never smoked. On examination she was did not have a fever and had crepitations in the base of her right lung. A chest radiograph showed right basal consolidation. Her blood tests showed: white blood cell count 17.5×109 cells/L (reference range 4-11), C reactive protein 3171 nmol/L (<47.6), urea 9.8 mmol/L (2.5-7.8), and creatinine 98 µmol/L (62-124). A diagnosis of community acquired pneumonia was made.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
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18

A puzzling airway problem

A fit and well 11 month old girl who was living with her single mother and 3 year old brother presented to the emergency department with acute shortness of breath and cough. Her mother had not witnessed any episodes of foreign body inhalation. A diagnosis of bronchiolitis was made and the child was discharged after oxygen therapy and observation. One week later she presented with the same symptoms and signs. Chest radiography was performed and was reported as normal. Again she was diagnosed and treated for bronchiolitis and made a complete recovery.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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9

Surgeon is struck off for behaviour “fundamentally incompatible” with being a doctor

A general surgeon who botched a cancer operation, failing to remove an easily palpable tumour and leaving the patient with a distorted chest, has been struck off the medical register after persistently refusing to acknowledge his mistakes.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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9

A woman with upper and lower airway symptoms

A 65 year old woman presented with a four week history of lethargy, cough, and feeling generally unwell. She had recently been treated for an ear infection and had occasional epistaxis but had no other medical history. She had never smoked. On examination she was did not have a fever and had crepitations in the base of her right lung. A chest radiograph showed right basal consolidation. Her blood tests showed: white blood cell count 17.5×109 cells/L (reference range 4-11), C reactive protein 3171 nmol/L (<47.6), urea 9.8 mmol/L (2.5-7.8), and creatinine 98 µmol/L (62-124). A diagnosis of community acquired pneumonia was made.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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13

X-ray Art Turns Radiology Into Gorgeousness (VIDEO) |

Your chest X-rays, and those of your child's valiantly broken arm, will soon be getting the proper recognition they deserve. X-ray Art is a new project rai  
medgadget.com
over 4 years ago
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8

Imaging Case of the Week 157

The following chest x-ray is from an adolescent who has been intubated following a critical asthma presentation. What radiological sign can be seen? It is very subtle.  
emergucate.com
over 4 years ago
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7

Rehabilitation for people with dementia following a hip fracture operation | Cochrane

Hip fracture is an injury primarily of elderly people, usually caused by a fall. It can affect a person's ability to walk, perform activities of daily living and remain independent. Hip fracture is more common in people with dementia and they can find it more difficult to recover. This is because they are at greater risk of becoming more confused and developing additional complications such as pressure sores and chest infections after their operation. They may also find it more difficult to express their pain and discomfort.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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5
409

Chest X-ray - BSCC

Describing the chest X-ray (CXR) on the flight deck - and in your examinations. Basic science in clinical context BSCC  
lifeinthefastlane.com
about 4 years ago
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17

Imaging Case of the Week 158

The following supine chest x-rays from a 52 year old patient were obtained in the resuscitation area following presentation post MVA. What radiological sign can be seen?  
emergucate.com
about 4 years ago
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10

Critical Care

We read with great interest the pilot study on fracture risk in 46 critically ill patients by Rawal and colleagues [1]. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed with portable calcaneal dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) on days 1 and 10. The authors found no overall change in BMD, but increased fracture risk in the subgroup with 'ARDS' (acute respiratory distress syndrome) (n = 34). There are several serious methodological problems: it is unclear if the group assignment is valid as only one of the four Berlin definition criteria [2] for the diagnosis of ARDS is given: oxygenation (no information on timing, chest imaging and origin of the edema). Although peripheral DXA devices are certainly an interesting option for BMD in critically ill and other patients [3], precision errors supplied by the manufacturer should not be used. In fact, each center must determine its (own) precision error and least significant change, which is also operator dependent [4]. The manufacturer stated a 0.9 % coefficient of variation, which is not necessarily applicable to the study setting where it remains unclear how the measurements were performed. This could be an important limitation. Hence, it is unlikely that a 2 % BMD change within such a short time frame as described would reflect anything else other than random variability. Lastly, it is also unclear what the described statistical difference refers to - it should be noted that the smaller subgroup (n = 12) numerically increased their BMD. Undoubtedly, fracture risk following critical illness is a very important topic that requires further high-quality studies [5].  
ccforum.com
about 4 years ago
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15

Imaging Case of the Week 158 Answer

The supine chest x-ray shows a deep sulcus sign on the left, which is a radiological sign seen in supine patients with pneumothorax.  
emergucate.com
about 4 years ago
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2
91

Instant Anatomy - Thorax - Areas/Organs - Respiratory system - Bronchopulmonary segments

Instant anatomy is a specialised web site for you to learn all about human anatomy of the body with diagrams, podcasts and revision questions  
instantanatomy.net
about 4 years ago
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13

Imaging Case of the Week 159

The following frontal chest x-ray is from a 65 year old with chronic dyspnoea. Which cardiac chamber enlargement can be observed?  
emergucate.com
about 4 years ago
Sinaiem dark
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10

cta-vs-vq-scan-in-the-pregnant-patient

A 25 y F g1p0 @8wks pregnant presents to ED complaining of SOB. Clinical suspicion for PE with a positive dimer to 0.68.  Assuming lower extremity dopplers and chest x ray are unremarkable. How will you further workup this patient?  
sinaiem.org
about 4 years ago
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2

HINDS: Crack the Chest. Get Crucified. - Intensive Care Network

John Hinds shows us why he will be so dearly missed in this superb talk from SMACC Chicago. This is about resuscitative thoracotomy but really so much more.  
intensivecarenetwork.com
about 4 years ago
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22

"Crack the Chest, Get Crucified" by John Hinds

One of John Honds' last lectures, delivered at SMACC Chicago, where he stole the show in typical fashion.  
ragepodcast.com
about 4 years ago
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15

John Hinds: Crack the Chest. Get Crucified. - St.Emlyn's

John Hinds Crack the Chest Get Crucified talk at #smaccUS  
stemlynsblog.org
about 4 years ago
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10

Hinds: Crack the Chest. Get Crucified

Please sign the petition !  
prehospitalmed.com
about 4 years ago