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6
42

Potential risk of carcinogens in e-cigarette vapour

The recent Public Health England evidence update on e-cigarettes is an important review by experts that will certainly guide public health policy in the UK.1 However, although the use of e-cigarettes is currently perceived to be less harmful than smoking, e-cigarettes …  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
2
73

Opportunistic & systemic mycoses tabulated summary

Identical features SPECIE MOLD FORM YEAST FORM Sporothrix schenckii Rosette shape @ Gram stain; septate hyphae w/ conidia in daisy wheel patter Cigar shape Cry…  
SlideShare
almost 6 years ago
Preview
2
21

Ad Breakdown: Sex and the e-cigarette - BBC News

E-cigarettes are to be shown in a TV advert for the first time, but will it be too sexualised for peak-time audiences?  
BBC News
about 5 years ago
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2
149

Imagine a world where procrastination became a productive pastime…

Imagine a world where procrastination became a productive pastime… Procrastination, as it stands, is a core feature of the ‘human condition’ and most would argue that it is here to stay. However, what if we could hijack the time we spend playing Candy Crush saga and trick ourselves into contributing towards something tangible. Today, I wish to explore this possibility with you. The phrase ‘gamification’ is not a new or made up word (I promise) although I agree it does sound jarring and I certainly wouldn’t recommend trying to use it in a game of scrabble (yet). The phrase itself refers to the process of applying game thinking and game mechanics to non-game contexts to engage users in solving problems. For our purposes and for the purposes of this blog ‘problems’ will equate to promoting healthy living for our patients and maintaining our own medical education. For one reason or another, most people show addictive behaviour towards games especially when they incorporate persistent elements of progression, achievement and competition with others. The underlying psychology won’t be discussed here; call it escapism, call it procrastination, call it whatever you will. What I want you to realise is that every day millions of people spend hours tending to virtual farms and cyber families whilst competing vigorously with ‘online’ friends. If we can take the addictive aspects of these popular games and incorporate them in to the non-game contexts I indicated to above, we could potentially trick ourselves, and even perhaps our patients, into a better way of life. The first time I heard the phrase ‘gamification’ was only last year. I was in Paris attending the Doctors 2.0 conference listening to talks on how cutting edge technologies and the Internet had been (or were going to be) incorporated into healthcare. One example that stood out to me was a gaming app that intended to engage people with diabetes to record their blood sugars more regularly and also compete with themselves to achieve better sugar control. People who have the condition of Diabetes Mellitus are continuously reminded of their diet and their blood sugar levels. I am not diabetic myself, but it is not hard to realise that diet and sugar control is going to be an absolute nightmare for people with diabetes both from a practical and psychological standpoint. Cue the mySugr Compainion, an FDA approved mobile application that was created to incorporate the achievement and progression aspects of game design to help encourage people with diabetes to achieve better sugar control. The app was a novel concept that struck a chord with me due to its potential to appeal to the part in everyone’s brain that makes them sit down and play ‘just one more level’ of their favorite game or app. There are several other apps on the market that are games designed to encourage self testing of blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. There is even a paediatric example titled; “Monster Manor,” which was launched by the popular Sanofi UK (who previously released the FDA / CE approved iBGStar iPhone blood glucose monitor). So applying aspects of game design into disease management apps has anecdotally been shown to benefit young people with Diabetes. However, disease management is just one area where game-health apps have emerged. We are taught throughout medical school and beyond that disease prevention is obviously beneficial to both our patients and the health economy. Unsurprisingly, one of the best ways to prevent disease is to maintain health (either through exercise and / or healthy eating). A prominent example of an app that helps to engage users in exercising is ‘RunKeeper,’ a mobile app that enables people to track and publish their latest jog-around-the-park. The elements of game design are a little more subtle in this example but the ability to track your own progress and compete with others via social media share buttons certainly reminds me of similar features seen in most of today’s online games. Other examples of ‘healthy living apps’ are rife amongst the respective ‘app stores,’ and there seems to be ample opportunity for the appliance of gamification in this field. An example might be to incorporate aspects of game design into a smoking cessation app or weight loss helper. Perhaps the addictive quality of a well designed game-app could overpower the urge for confectionary or that ‘last cigarette’… The last area where I think ‘gamification’ could have a huge benefit is in (medical) education. Learning and revising are particularly susceptible to the rot of procrastination, so it goes without saying that many educational vendors have already attempted to incorporate fresh ways in which they can engage their users to put down the TV remote and pick up some knowledge for the exams. Meducation itself already has an area on its website entitled ‘Exam Room,’ where you can test yourself, track your progress and provide feedback on the questions you are given. I have always found this a far more addictive way to revise than sitting down with pen and paper to revise from a book. However, I feel there could be a far greater incorporation of game design in the field of medical education. Perhaps the absolute dream for like-minded gamers out there would be a super-gritty medical simulator that exposes you to common medical emergencies from the comfort of your own computer screen. I mean, my shiny new gaming console lets me pretend to be an elite solider deep behind enemy lines so why not let me pretend and practice to be a doctor too? You could even have feedback functionality to indicate where your management might have deviated from the optimum. Perhaps more sensibly, the potential also exists to build on the existing banks of online medical questions to incorporate further aspects of social media interaction, achievement unlocks and inter-player competition (because in case you hadn’t noticed, medics are a competitive breed). I have given a couple of very basic examples on how aspects of game design have emerged in recent health-related apps. I feel this phenomenon is in its infancy. The technology exists for so much more than the above, we just need to use our imagination… and learn how to code.  
Dr. Luke Farmery
about 6 years ago
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2
12

Smokeless tobacco: South Asian communities | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

This guidance aims to help people of South Asian origin who are living in England to stop using traditional South Asian varieties of smokeless tobacco. The phrase 'of South Asian origin' refers here to people with ancestral links to Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan or Sri Lanka.  
nice.org.uk
about 4 years ago
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1
17

FDA moves to regulate e-cigarettes and pipe and hookah tobacco

The US Food and Drug Administration announced on Thursday 24 April that it would propose rules to extend its authority to cover a variety of currently unregulated tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, nicotine gels, water pipe (hookah) tobacco, and dissolvable tobacco products.1 Any future products that meet the statutory definition of a “tobacco product” would also come under its authority, the FDA said.  
bmj.com
almost 6 years ago
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1
13

E-cigarette companies target youth, US congressional study finds

Makers of electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, market their products to young people by sponsoring youth oriented events, advertising on media with young audiences, making products with flavors that appeal to children and teenagers, and handing out free samples at youth events, says an investigation commissioned by Democratic members of the US Congress.1  
bmj.com
almost 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
25

A man with fever, a productive cough, and a striking chest radiograph | The BMJ

A 41 year old man presented to the emergency department with a two week history of worsening shortness of breath. Associated symptoms included a cough productive of green sputum, intermittent fevers, night sweats, and non-pleuritic pain in the right side of the chest wall. He had a history of chronic pancreatitis secondary to alcohol excess, which was complicated by diet controlled type 2 diabetes. He also smoked 40 cigarettes a day. - currently located behind a paywall. Your institution may have access through Athens/Elservier or similar.  
bmj.com
almost 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
22

A man with fever, a productive cough, and a striking chest radiograph

A 41 year old man presented to the emergency department with a two week history of worsening shortness of breath. Associated symptoms included a cough productive of green sputum, intermittent fevers, night sweats, and non-pleuritic pain in the right side of the chest wall. He had a history of chronic pancreatitis secondary to alcohol excess, which was complicated by diet controlled type 2 diabetes. He also smoked 40 cigarettes a day.  
bmj.com
almost 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
19

A man with fever, a productive cough, and a striking chest radiograph

A 41 year old man presented to the emergency department with a two week history of worsening shortness of breath. Associated symptoms included a cough productive of green sputum, intermittent fevers, night sweats, and non-pleuritic pain in the right side of the chest wall. He had a history of chronic pancreatitis secondary to alcohol excess, which was complicated by diet controlled type 2 diabetes. He also smoked 40 cigarettes a day.  
bmj.com
almost 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
25

A man with fever, a productive cough, and a striking chest radiograph

A 41 year old man presented to the emergency department with a two week history of worsening shortness of breath. Associated symptoms included a cough productive of green sputum, intermittent fevers, night sweats, and non-pleuritic pain in the right side of the chest wall. He had a history of chronic pancreatitis secondary to alcohol excess, which was complicated by diet controlled type 2 diabetes. He also smoked 40 cigarettes a day.  
www.bmj.com
almost 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
28

E-cigarettes are “gateway devices” for smoking among young people, say researchers

Adolescents who use electronic cigarettes were more likely to smoke conventional cigarettes and less likely to quit smoking, a study from the United States has found, leading the researchers to conclude that the nicotine delivery devices are “unlikely to discourage conventional cigarette smoking among youths.”  
bmj.com
almost 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
12

A man with fever, a productive cough, and a striking chest radiograph

A 41 year old man presented to the emergency department with a two week history of worsening shortness of breath. Associated symptoms included a cough productive of green sputum, intermittent fevers, night sweats, and non-pleuritic pain in the right side of the chest wall. He had a history of chronic pancreatitis secondary to alcohol excess, which was complicated by diet controlled type 2 diabetes. He also smoked 40 cigarettes a day.  
www.bmj.com
almost 6 years ago
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1
15

E-cigarette users in UK have 'tripled' since 2010 - BBC News

The number of electronic cigarette users in the UK has tripled over the past two years, says Action on Smoking and Health.  
BBC News
almost 6 years ago
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1
12

The arguments for and against the e-cigarette - BBC News

The British Medical Association has recommended electronic cigarettes should be banned.  
BBC News
almost 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
33

Use of e-cigarettes in UK has tripled in two years, finds survey

The use of electronic cigarettes in the United Kingdom has tripled in the past two years, with 2.1 million people regularly using the devices in 2014, up from 700 000 in 2012, a survey for the antismoking charity Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) has found.  
bmj.com
almost 6 years ago
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1
24

E-cigarettes 'help smokers to quit' - BBC News

Smokers who use e-cigarettes to quit are more likely to succeed than those who use willpower alone or buy nicotine replacement therapies, such as patches or gum, a study suggests.  
BBC News
over 5 years ago
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1
15

Regulate unhealthy food like cigarettes, campaigners urge

The World Health Organization is being urged to introduce a “tobacco style” response to unhealthy food in a bid to curb the global epidemic of obesity.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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1
58

The battle between big tobacco and vape shops

Electronic cigarettes seem to be everywhere. Characters on the US television show Saturday Night Live smoke them to look cool1; the movie The Hangover Part III portrays mob kingpins as e-cigarette users; and e-cigarette companies are now paying for product placement in movies (which manufacturers of conventional tobacco cigarettes are not permitted to do).2  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
18

E-cigarettes latest: users on the up but rules tighten

Only one company was making e-cigarettes in 2005, but today there are 466 brands in a market estimated to be worth £1.8bn (€2.3bn; $3bn).1 Many early, small scale companies making e-cigarettes have been swallowed up by tobacco manufacturers. In January 2014 there were 7764 unique flavours on the market, including menthol, fruits, candies, alcoholic drinks, and snacks.2  
bmj.com
about 5 years ago