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Medical Student Podcast 004

Imperial College closes its fast-track grad programme (00:49); Faisel Alam discusses sharia law-compliant student loans (3:18); Will Sapwell gives tips from the BMA's new student finance guide (6:33); University of Leicester trials virtual patient consultations (12:03); Harrison Carter talks about his experience on BBC's Eggheads (16:18).  
Audioboo
over 3 years ago
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13

Medical Student Podcast 004

Imperial College closes its fast-track grad programme (00:49); Faisel Alam discusses sharia law-compliant student loans (3:18); Will Sapwell gives tips from the BMA's new student finance guide (6:33); University of Leicester trials virtual patient consultations (12:03); Harrison Carter talks about his experience on BBC's Eggheads (16:18).  
audioBoom
almost 3 years ago
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2
19

Innovative Programme Elements Add Value to a FAIMER Regional Institute Faculty Development Fellowship Model in Southern Africa

The Foundation for the Advancement of Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) is a US-based non-profit organisation committed to improving health professions education to improve global health. FAIMER traditionally offers a two year fellowship programme; 2 residential and 3 distance learning sessions and an education innovation project in the fellow’s home institution. The focus is on education methods, leadership/management, scholarship and the development of an international community of health professions educators. During the past 5 years, FAIMER has expanded the programme and established regional institutes in India[3], Brazil[1] and Southern Africa (SAFRI)[1]. We implemented the programme in Africa in 2008, introducing 5 innovations to the generic programme. SAFRI was created as an independent voluntary association to reflect the multinational intent of the programme. Aim of project To understand the impact of the innovations in the structure and implementation of the programme on its quality and the experience of the participants in it. Conclusions Faculty development programmes can significantly enhance their impact: Be sensitive to the local political climate Demonstrate wide ownership Focus on developing a community of practice Work within the professional time constraints of Fellows and faculty Maximise learning opportunities by linking to other scholarly activities  
Juanita Bezuidenhout
almost 8 years ago
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9

EMS Fellowship: 10 Questions I Wish Applicants Would Ask the Fellowship Director

EMS Fellowship: 10 Questions I Wish Applications Would Ask the Fellowship Director  
aliem.com
about 2 years ago
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0
7

Vodcast on Applying to Crit Care Fellowship from EM

Vodcast on Crit Care Fellowship  
emcrit.org
over 2 years ago
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0
11

#CAEP15 Special Edition | Digital Scholarship Elective - An Educational Innovation by the BoringEM team - CanadiEM

This describes the Digital Scholarship elective rotation set up by Drs. Alia Dharamsi, Andrew Petrosoniak, Teresa Chan in the fall of 2014.  
boringem.org
over 2 years ago
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13

My Year as the ALiEM-CORD Fellow in Social Media and Digital Scholarship

My Year as the ALiEM-CORD Fellow in Social Media and Digital Scholarship by Dr. Sam Shaikh  
aliem.com
over 2 years ago
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0
17

Considering a Medical Toxicology Fellowship?

Considering a Medical Toxicology Fellowship? Advice by Dr. Lewis Nelson and Dr. Annie Arens.  
aliem.com
about 2 years ago
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7

2015 ALiEM Essentials of EM Fellowship Winners and Runner-Ups

Announcing the 2015 Essentials of EM Fellowship Winners and Runner-Ups  
aliem.com
about 2 years ago
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3

UK doctors unlikely to be able to repay student loans, study finds

UK doctors are unlikely to be able to fully repay their student loans over the course of their working lives, shows an analysis published in BMJ Open.1  
feeds.bmj.com
over 2 years ago
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“I know exactly what I'm going into”: recommendations for pre-nursing experience from an evaluation of a pre-nursing scholarship in rural Scotland - Smith - 2015 - Nursing Open - Wiley Online Library

Our site uses cookies to improve your experience. You can find out more about our use of cookies in About Cookies, including instructions on how to turn off cookies if you wish to do so. By continuing to browse this site you agree to us using cookies as described in About Cookies.  
onlinelibrary.wiley.com
about 2 years ago
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7

My ALiEM-EMRA Fellowship: From Finding the FOAM to Lathering the Soap

ALiEM-EMRA fellow, Scott Kobner, reviews his year working with the ALiEM team.  
aliem.com
over 2 years ago
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5

UK doctors unlikely to be able to repay student loans

UK doctors are unlikely to be able to repay their student loans over the course of their working lives, amassing debts of more than £80,000 by the time they graduate, in some cases, finds...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 2 years ago
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13

Announcing the ALiEM-AgileMD Educational Design Fellowship

Announcing the ALiEM-AgileMD Educational Design Fellowship  
aliem.com
over 2 years ago
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5

APPLY NOW: Essentials of Emergency Medicine & Education Fellowship Program

APPLY NOW: Essentials of Emergency Medicine and the Education Fellowship Program  
aliem.com
over 2 years ago
2c303242767e22ec0fdccbfe0e3ec606
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Pennyless Med Students: Medical student finance FARCE

There are roughly 7000 medical students graduating each year from 33 medical schools in the UK. Medical degrees take either 4, 5 or 6 years depending on the route you take. The government via the Student Finance Company will pay for your tuition fees for the first 4 years of any undergraduate degree. After this the NHS will pay for the last year or 2 years of the undergraduate medical tuition fees. The maintenance loan depends on family income. The figures aren’t easy to find for the background of most UK medical students but a ‘guestimate’ based on my medical school is that 50% went to a private school, 30% went to selective state schools and 20% went to a comprehensive. Of the private school kids probably about half had a scholarship or bursary. So, a rough guess would be that 70% of med students come from a “middle class” family who have a decent income but not huge wealth and are therefore eligible for a ‘maintenance loan’ above the minimum. This majority therefore rely on there loan to get through the year. An average student income is between £1000 and £1500/term (£1200 average-ish). Most university terms are 10 weeks, hence average income is about £120/week. As a preclinical medical student this is fine and we are on par with everyone else. As soon as we become clinical med students the game changes! Clinical years are far longer, more like 40 weeks a year rather than 30. Students are on placement, have to dress professionally and travel to placement daily. This adds additional costs and requires the money to stretch further. Doubly bad! Once, the NHS starts paying the tuition fees, the Student Loans Company starts reducing the maintenance loan, by half! Why? A final year student or a 4th year who has intercalated now has to survive at University for one of their course’s longest years with half the money they had previously. >40 weeks on a loan of roughly £1500/year. This situation is pretty much unique to medical students. Some students are lucky enough to have parents who can afford the extra couple of thousand pounds required for the year. Some students get selected into the military and get a salary. A greater proportion find part time jobs to help cover the cost and the rest have to resort to saving money where they can and taking out loans. When I was a member of the BMA medical student committee I did a project as part of the finance sub-committee investigating the loans available for medical students. Many banks used to “professional development loans” which allowed medical and law students to borrow money for a year before they had to start repaying the loan. Hardly any banks now offer this service, so the only loan available is an overdraft or a standard loan that requires you to have a regular income. This means that final year medical students with limited family support may have to live for a year on less than £2000. Does this seem fair? Does this seem sensible government policy? Medical students are 99% guaranteed to be earning over £25 thousand pounds within a year. We will be able to repay any loans. So why isn’t the Student Loan Company allowing us to continue having a ‘normal’ maintenance loan? And why aren’t banks giving us the benefit of the doubt and helping us out in our time of need? When I was on the BMA MSC there was talk of having a campaign to lobby government and the banks to rectify this situation but I can’t say I’ve been aware of any such campaign. Are the NUS, BMA, UKMSA or anyone else doing anything about this? Please do leave a comment if you do know if there has been a progress and if there hasn’t why don’t we start making a fuss about this!  
jacob matthews
about 3 years ago