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Arteries and Veins of Brachial Plexus

Dr. Fabian explaining the arteries and veins of the brachial plexus  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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Dilated vein

UpToDate, electronic clinical resource tool for physicians and patients that provides information on Adult Primary Care and Internal Medicine, Allergy and Immunology, Cardiovascular Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Endocrinology and Diabetes, Family Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Hematology, Infectious Diseases, Nephrology and Hypertension, Neurology, Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Women's Health, Oncology, Pediatrics, Pulmonary, Critical Care, Sleep Medicine, Rheumatology, Surgery, and more.  
uptodate.com
about 5 years ago
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The Complete Guide to Vascular Ultrasound

This volume is a comprehensive how-to guide to ultrasound evaluation of vascular pathology. The book provides both the technical know-how and the analytical skills needed to obtain the maximum information from examinations and to accurately diagnose a given problem. Chapters provide detailed coverage of abdominal vasculature, peripheral arteries, hemodialysis and bypass grafts, peripheral veins, penile vessels, and the cerebrovascular system. Each chapter includes sections on anatomy, pathology, questions to ask the patient, examination techniques, diagnostic analysis, and other diagnostic tests related to the clinical problem. More than 100 full-color Doppler images demonstrate the full spectrum of pathologic findings.  
Google Books
almost 5 years ago
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How could it be possible to get angina from normal coronary arteries in cardiac x syndrome?

Now I'm doing a rotation in cardiology. I've come across about Cardiac X syndrome, but I don't really get what it is. A book said "it is a form of microvascular angina but occurs in normal coronary arteries". Unfortunately, no-where in the book is it explained in depth. So I have a few questions: Is there any proper definition and how to diagnose it? What is the pathophysiology than can explain this syndrome? Does it something related to metabolic x syndrome? Any takers?  
malek ahmad
about 7 years ago
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What happens to the superior cerebral veins if there is an increase of intra-cranial pressure?

Especially the larger and posterior ones. It is stated that these veins are "directed obliquely forward, against the direction of flow in the sinus, an arrangement that may resist their collapse when intra-cranial pressure is raised." So, what does it mean? The other veins would collapse but the larger posterior ones? How would this "arrangement" be of significance?  
Rama Raja
about 7 years ago
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What are the adverse effects of using central venous drugs in peripheral veins?

I've seen them used in peripheral veins. What about the long-term consequences?  
Rama Raja
almost 7 years ago
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Does a severely dehydrated patient in a recumbent position have flat neck veins?

Does a person with severe dehydration or hypovolemia has flat neck veins when lying horizontally? If yes, can this be considered one of the dehydration/hypovolemia signs?  
Jan Modric
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 3p9kow?1444773972
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A medical mystery for Mother's Day...

I'd like to tell you a curious story. Jane was a 52 year old woman in need of a kidney transplant. Thankfully she had three loving sons who were all very happy to give her one of theirs. So Jane's doctors performed tests to find out which of the three boys would be the best match, but the results surprised everyone. In the words of Jeremy Kyle, the DNA test showed that Jane was not the mother of two of the boys... Hang on, said Jane, child birth is not something you easily forget. They're definitely mine. And she was right. It turns out Jane was a chimera. Chimerism is the existence of two genetically different cell lines in one organism. This can arise for a number of reasons- it can be iatrogenic, like when someone has an organ transplant, or it can be naturally occurring. In Jane's case, it began in her mum's womb, with two eggs that had been fertilised by different sperm creating two embryos. Ordinarily, they would develop into two non-identical twins. However in Jane's case the two balls of cells fused early in development creating one person with both cell lines. Thus when doctors did the first tissue typing tests on Jane, just by chance they had only sampled the 'yellow' cell line which was responsible for one of her sons. When they went back again they found the 'pink' cell line which had given rise to the other two boys. This particular type of human chimerism is thought to be pretty rare- there are only 30 case reports in the literature. (Though remarkably both House and CSI's Gil Grissom have encountered cases.) What happens far more frequently is fetal microchimerism- which occurs in pregnant women when cells cross the placenta from baby to mum. This is awesome because we used to think the placenta was this barrier which prevented any cells crossing over. Now we've found both cells and free floating DNA cross the placenta, and that the cells can hang around for decades after the baby was born. Why? As is often the case in medicine we're not sure but one theory is that the fetal cells might have healing properties for mum. In pregnant mice who've had a heart attack, fetal cells can travel to the mum's heart where the develop into new heart muscle to repair the damage. Whilst we're still in the early stages of understanding why this happens, we already have a practical application. In the United States today, a pregnant woman can have a blood test which isn't looking for abnormalities in her DNA but in that of her fetus. The DNA test isn't conclusive enough to be used to diagnose genetic conditions, but it is a good screening test for certain trisomies including Down's syndrome. Now, we started with a curious tale, so lets close with a curious fact, and one that's appropriate for Mother's Day: This exchange of cells across the placenta is a two way process. So you may well have some of your mum's cells rushing through your veins right now. In my case they're probably the ones that tell me to put on sensible shoes and put that boy down... (FYI: This is a story I originally posted on my own blog)  
Dr Catherine Carver
almost 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1fhdw5v?1444774091
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The Arterial Highway

Metaphors and analogies have long been used to turn complex medical concepts into everyday ones, albeit with fancy terminology. Having been involved with many 3D animations on the topics of Blood Pressure, arteriosclerosis, cholesterol and the like, we find that often a metaphor goes a long way to building understanding, credibility and even compliance with patients. One of my favorite analogies is what we call the arterial highway. Much like their tarmacked counterparts, arteries act as conduits for all the parts that make your body go. A city typically uses highways, gas lines, water pipes, railways and other infrastructure to distribute important materials to its people. Your body is much the same, except that it does it all in one system, the cardiovascular system. This is used to deliver nutrients, extract waste, transport and deliver oxygen and even to maintain the temperature! The arteries can do all these things because of their smart three-layered structure. Our arteries consist of a muscular tube lined by smooth tissue. They have three layers named – the Adventitia, Media and Intima. Each is designed with a specific function and through the magic of evolution has developed to perform its function perfectly. The first is the Tunica Adventitia, or just adventitia. It is a strong outer covering over the arteries and veins. It has special tissues that are fibrous. The fibers let the arteries flex, expanding and contracting to accommodate changes in blood pressure as the blood flows past it. Unlike a steel pipe, arteries pulsate and so must be at once be flexible, and strong. Tunica Media - the middle layer of the walls of arteries and veins is made up of a smooth muscle with some elasticity built in. This layer expands and contracts in a rhythmic fashion, much like a Wave at a baseball game, as blood moves along it. The media layer is thicker in arteries than in veins, and importantly so, as arteries carry blood at a higher pressure than veins. The innermost layer of arteries and veins is the Tunica Intima. In arteries, this layer is composed of an elastic lining and smooth endothelium - a thin sheet of cells that form a type of skin over the surface. The elastic tissue present in the artery can stretch and return, allowing the arteries to adapt to changes in flow and blood pressure. The intima is also a very smoothe, slick layer so that blood can easily flow past it. Every layer of the artery has developed evolutionary traits that help your arterial system to maintain flexibility, strength and promote blood flow. Diseases and conditions like high cholesterol or high blood pressure, diabetes and others prevent the arteries from doing their function well by creating blockages or increasing the stress on one or more of the layers. For example, high blood pressure causes rips in the smooth lining of the Intima. Anybody who has experienced a pipe burst in a house knows that the damage can be extreme and can never fully be restored. Understanding the delicate functions of the arterial structure gives good incentive to treat them better. Conditions like high blood pressure, high cholesterol and lifestyle diseases such as diabetes create tears, holes, blockages, and can disrupt the functions of one or more layers. Getting patients to visualize the effect of bad eating habits on their anatomy helps to increase patient compliance. In modern society, the concept of highways goes hand in hand with the concept of traffic jams. Patients understand that the arterial highway is one that can never be jammed.  
Mr. Rohit Singh
over 6 years ago
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Lower Limb Veins Overview - 3D Anatomy Tutorial

Lower limb veins anatomy tutorial. Check out the 3D app at http://AnatomyLearning.com. More tutorials available on http://AnatomyZone.com In this video tutor...  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
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FDA approves closure system to permanently treat varicose veins

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the VenaSeal closure system (VenaSeal system) to permanently treat varicose veins of the legs by sealing the affected superficial veins using...  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 5 years ago
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Physicians pioneer the use of stereotactic body radiation for deadly kidney cancer complication

Investigators have published what is believed to be the first reported successful use of stereotactic body radiation therapy for an often deadly complication of kidney cancer. The stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) was used to treat inferior vena cava tumor thrombus (IVC-TT) that reached the heart, a complication of kidney cancer in which the tumor extends into the venous system ? the system of veins that return blood to the heart. An estimated 4 to 36 percent of kidney tumors are associated with IVC-TT.  
sciencedaily.com
almost 5 years ago
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Coffee consumption and coronary artery calcium

Stream Coffee consumption and coronary artery calcium by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
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Long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and coronary artery calcification in Japanese men

Stream Long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and coronary artery calcification in Japanese men by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
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SGEM#47: Hail to the Chief (Coronary Artery Stents)

Guest Skeptic: Dr. David Newman. Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, NY. The creator of The NNT and SMART EM.  Author of Hippocrates’ Shadow: Secrets from the House of Medicine.  
thesgem.com
almost 5 years ago
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Warmed fluids for preventing hypothermia during operations | Cochrane

During surgical operations, patients may become cold as the result of a combination of factors including the action of anaesthetic drugs, the presence of uncovered skin and the administration of cold fluids into the veins or to parts of the body where surgery is taking place to wash them. Becoming cold during surgery can be unpleasant and can cause excessive shivering after the operation. It can also cause heart problems and bleeding problems and can contribute to problems with pressure sores and wound healing and longer hospital stay. This review seeks to find out whether warming the fluids given into veins or used to wash parts of the body may prevent patients from becoming cold.  
cochrane.org
almost 5 years ago
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Ablation of pulmonary veins works as well as more extensive treatment in persistent atrial fibrillation, study finds

Extensive catheter ablation is no more effective than more targeted ablation to isolate the pulmonary veins in reducing the rate of recurrent atrial fibrillation in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation, a trial reported in the New England Journal of Medicine has found.1  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection - emdocs

emDocs post containing very useful emergency medicine information  
emdocs.net
over 4 years ago
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Endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate glue versus other endoscopic procedures for acute bleeding gastric varices in people with portal hypertension | Cochrane

Acute bleeding from ruptured gastric varices (enlarged veins), the most severe consequence of portal hypertension (that is increased pressure in the veins leading to the liver), is associated with high death rates. The most promising treatment for this condition is considered to be endoscopic sclerotherapy (passing a flexible tube with a camera at the end down the oesophagus (swallowing tube) allowing direct visualisation and treatment of bleeding varices) with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (cyanoacrylate), which is a glue that causes blood clots to form and stops the bleeding. However, incidence of re-bleeding and complications have opened a debate on when this glue should be used compared with other endoscopic procedures.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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Y-GRAFT TECHNIQUE For coronary artery anastomosis

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Cardiothoracic-Surgery-Department-Tanta-University/172964712755810  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago