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Nutritional support in children and young people with cancer undergoing chemotherapy | Cochrane

The provision of safe, appropriate and effective nutritional support for children and young people undergoing treatment for cancer is now well recognised as an important part of their care. It may help to reverse malnutrition seen at diagnosis, prevent malnutrition associated with the cancer, promote weight gain and growth and improve quality of life. Nutritional support may be provided by one of two methods: intravenous nutritional liquids delivered through a central or peripheral vein which bypass the gut (parenteral nutrition); or nutritional liquids or solids that pass through any part of the gut, regardless of method of delivery (e.g. orally or via a tube; enteral nutrition).  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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Steroids inserted into the eye versus observation for macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion | Cochrane

We aimed to examine the benefits and harms of inserting steroids into the eye for treating macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO-ME).  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection | Resus Review

Understanding SCAD including risk factors, triggers, angiographic diagnosis, and deciding between conservative and invasive treatment.  
resusreview.com
over 4 years ago
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31

Rutosides for prevention of post-thrombotic syndrome | Cochrane

Blood clots in the veins of the leg are a common problem and are termed deep vein thrombosis (DVT). One in three patients with a DVT develops a complication known as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). This syndrome involves ongoing swelling of the affected leg, pain, and also skin changes. At the current time the main way of preventing PTS is to wear compression stockings. However, it is known that patients frequently find the stocking uncomfortable and would prefer to take an oral medication to prevent the problem.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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Rutosides for treatment of post-thrombotic syndrome  | Cochrane

Blood clots in the veins of the leg are a common problem and are termed deep vein thrombosis (DVT). One in three patients with a DVT develops a complication known as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). This syndrome involves ongoing swelling of the affected leg, pain, cramps, burning or prickling, and itching. Darkening of the skin because of increased pigmentation and varicose veins, redness and skin irritation can also occur. At the current time the main way of treating PTS is to wear compression stockings. It is known however that patients frequently find the stocking uncomfortable and so they may prefer to take an oral medication to treat the problem. Rutosides are a herbal remedy which has been shown to be effective in other conditions affecting the veins (chronic venous insufficiency).  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection | Resus Review

Understanding SCAD including risk factors, triggers, angiographic diagnosis, and deciding between conservative and invasive treatment.  
charlesbruen.wpengine.com
over 4 years ago
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Percutaneous central venous catheters versus peripheral cannulae for delivery of parenteral nutrition in neonates | Cochrane

Review question: In newborn infants receiving parenteral nutrition, does delivery into deep veins (via percutaneous central venous catheters) versus superficial veins (via peripheral cannulae) affect nutrition, growth and development, and adverse events including infection or skin damage?  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
Sinaiem dark
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weve-got-a-pumper-here

Hemostasis is an essential step in wound management. Most commonly, bleeding is caused by lacerated subdermal plexus and superficial veins which can be controlled with pressure alone. When lacerations are especially deep, an artery may also be affected. In these situations, special maneuvers are often necessary to obtain adequate hemostasis.  
sinaiem.org
over 4 years ago
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Coronary Artery Diagramming | Resus Review

Understand the coronary artery anatomy with a free useful diagram that is easy to markup and helps facilitate communication.  
resusreview.com
over 4 years ago
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Interventions for varicose veins and leg oedema in pregnancy | Cochrane

Varicose veins, sometimes called varicosity, occur when a valve in the blood vessel walls weakens and the blood stagnates. This in turn leads to problems with the circulation in the veins and to oedema or swelling. The vein then becomes distended, its walls stretch and sag, allowing the vein to swell into a tiny balloon near the surface of the skin. The veins in the legs are most commonly affected as they are working against gravity, but the vulva (vaginal opening) or rectum, resulting in haemorrhoids (piles), can be affected too. Pregnancy seems to increase the risk of varicose veins and they cause considerable pain, night cramps, numbness, tingling, the legs may feel heavy, achy, and they are rather ugly. Treatments for varicose veins are usually divided into three main groups: pharmacological treatments, non-pharmacological and surgery. The review identified seven trials involving 326 women. Although there was a moderate quality evidence to suggest that the drug rutoside seemed to be effective in reducing symptoms, the study was too small to be able to say this with real confidence. Similarly, with reflexology and water immersion, there were insufficient data to be able to assess benefits and harms, but they looked promising. Compression stockings do not appear to have any advantages. More research is needed.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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Recurrence of Paroxysmal AF After Pulmonary Vein Isolation

A repeat ablation is performed in around 30 percent of patients due to arrhythmia recurrence, but the strategy for this repeat procedure is not defined.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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10-Year CHD Risk Prediction Using Coronary Artery Calcium

Are 10-year risk projections better when coronary calcium scores are part of the equation?  
medscape.com
about 4 years ago
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index.html

     Activities Index Chapter Activity Names 1 Levels of Biological Organization Dorsal and Ventral Cavities Body Planes Anatomical Terminology:Orientation and Directional Terms 2 The Structure of Atoms Common Elements in Living Organisms Electron Arrangement Ionic Bonds Covalent Bonds Characteristics of Acids, Bases, and Salts 3 Parts of the Cell: Structure Structure of the Plasma Membrane Membrane Transport Selective Permeability Passive Transport Identifying Connective Tissue 4 Structure of the Skin 5 Microscopic Structure of Compact Bone Common Types of Fractures Facial Bones Typical Vertebra Classification of Bones Types of Synovial Joints 6 Connective Tissue Wrappings of Skeletal Muscle Microscopic Anatomy of Skeletal Fiber Organizational Level of Skeletal Muscles Graded Muscle Responses Muscles of the Body Posterior Surface Musclulature 7 Glial Cells and Their Functions Classification of Neurons The Human Brain: Sagittal Section Parts of the Brain Meninges of the Brain Anatomy of the Spinal Cord Cranial Nerves Structure of a Nerve Descriptions of Cranial Nerves Distribution of Spinal Nerves 8 Internal Structures of the Eye Optics of the Eye Internal Structures of the Ear 9 Hormones and Their Target Cells Ionic Calcium Levels in Blood Regulation of Blood Sugar Levels by Insulin and Glycogen 10 Formed Elements 11 External Anatomy of the Heart Frontal Section of the Heart Intrinsic Conduction System of the Heart Arterial Circulation Veins of the Systemic Circulation 12 Lymphatic Collecting Vessels and Regional Lymph Nodes Events in Allergic Reactions 13 Anatomy of the Upper Respiratory Tract Gas Transport 14 Digestive System Basic Structure of the Alimentary Wall Gastrointestinal Tract Activities Overview of Cellular Respiration 15 Anatomy and Function of the Nephron Nephron Activity Early Filtrate Processing 16 Male Reproductive Anatomy: Sagittal View The Female Menstrual Cycle  
media.pearsoncmg.com
about 4 years ago
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Treatment for superficial infusion thrombophlebitis of the upper extremity | Cochrane

Superficial thrombophlebitis is an inflammatory condition of the veins just below the surface of the skin. The development of superficial thrombophlebitis frequently complicates the insertion of needles into the veins for catheters to give medication or fluids in hospitalised patients. The best treatment for these blood clots in the hands and arms remains unclear. While local treatment has the potential to improve the painful symptoms and patient discomfort, it may not prevent complications, including infection or the extension or transit of the clot into the deep vein system.  
cochrane.org
about 4 years ago
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Replacing heparin with saline to prevent complications in long term central venous catheters in children | Cochrane

A central venous catheter (CVC) is a long, thin, flexible tube which is inserted into a large central vein. This enables access to the blood stream for people with serious medical conditions to receive medications and fluids, as well as the collection of blood specimens. Long term central venous catheters are used to access the blood system in children with complex medical conditions like cancer. To stop the catheter from becoming blocked it is usual to use heparin, a drug that prevents clots forming, to flush the catheter. However, some studies have shown that heparin is not necessary, and that normal saline (a sterile salt water solution) can be safely used instead. Heparin may be associated with complications, such as bleeding and infection, along with higher costs for health care providers. While the complications such as infections and occlusions are uncommon, practices vary around the world and there are many inconsistencies regarding the best flush solution to use to prevent complications in long term catheters.  
cochrane.org
about 4 years ago
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Eyes-On Wearable Ultrasound and IR Glasses for Easy Venipuncture, Maybe Much More |

Evena Medical, a Roseville, CA firm, is releasing an ultrasound and near-infrared device for vein viewing that clinicians can simply wear like a pair of bu  
medgadget.com
about 4 years ago
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Surgery for complete rectal prolapse in adults | Cochrane

Complete, or full-thickness rectal prolapse is when the lower part of the intestine (the rectum) becomes loose and telescopes out of the anus when straining. It should not be confused with haemorrhoids (or piles), which is when the veins around the anus swell up. Rectal prolapse is most common in older people, especially women, although its cause is unclear. Rectal prolapse can cause complications, such as pain, ulcers, bleeding and faecal incontinence (inability to control bowel movements). Surgery is a common treatment for repairing the prolapse.  
cochrane.org
about 4 years ago
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Best Central Venous Catheter Location?

Which vein is associated with the fewest central venous catheter complications?  
medscape.com
about 4 years ago
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Clinical Anatomy Explained! The Development of Cardinal Veins and the Large Veins

This video goes into how the cardinal veins, a group of embryonic veins, interconnect, rescind, and develop to create the large veins of the body.  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
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Compliance and elastance

Learn about compliance (and elastance) of arteries, veins, and lead pipes! Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy.  
khanacademy.org
almost 4 years ago