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Virus Mind Map

A simple mind map to organize the DNA and RNA viruses into similar groups for easier memorization.  
Ryan Matthews
almost 6 years ago
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Zika Virus Tutorial

What is Zika virus? Zika virus is a mosquito-borne virus that causes mild illness in adults, but has been linked with microcephaly in newborns.  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
3c0d094c67051f7a8e2d6764b0ae7aa00bc58ba1503177806034594
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Pneumonia: Causes, Types, & Symptoms

Pneumonia is an infection in the lungs that can be caused by a variety of different pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria. Depending on the pathogen, symptoms can range in severity; this video covers the pathophysiology of a lung infection, as well as common types, clinical signs and symptoms, and treatments.  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
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VIRUS INFECTIONS

MECHANISMS OF VIRAL PATHOGENICITY A CLINICALLY BIASED ACCOUNT OF COMMON PATHOGENIC VIRUSES THERAPY OF VIRAL INFECTIONS  
Philip Welsby
almost 9 years ago
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Ebola Virus Disease - MOA Animation - Scientific Animations

We all hear about Ebola being a deadly disease, and indeed it is. The rather agressive virus has already claimed about 10,000 lives. But what really makes Ebola such a deadly virus? Let’s try and understand how Ebola really attacks the cells within the body which in turn leads to multiple organ failure and then exigency. This 3D Medical Animation illustrates the Mechanism of Action of the Ebola Virus.  
scientificanimations.com
over 4 years ago
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TORCHES Acronym with Explanation!

This video discusses the perinatally acquired infections. Included are HIV, HSV, toxoplasma gondii, Rubella, Cytomegalo virus (CMV), and Syphillis.  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
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FirstAidTeam.com » Mnemonics

Viruses… not only can they literally make you sick to your stomach from gastroenteritis, but trying to remember their classifications can cause significant nausea as well!  
firstaidteam.com
about 5 years ago
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Enveloped dna viruses alpha and hhv6

Herpes Simplex Virus/ Varicella Zoster/ Sixth Disease  
SlideShare
almost 6 years ago
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Hepatitis B/ Chronic Hepatitis/Serum Hepatitis

• In the family Hepadnaviridae; common name: Hepadnavirus • Known as the smallest DNA virus • Double stranded, circular 42 nm DNA genome;Virion also called Dan…  
SlideShare
almost 6 years ago
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3
181

Microbiology Viruses Structure Types and Bacteriophage Replication

More Anatomy Lessons : https://www.youtube.com/user/AnatomyProfStudent Anatomy video Anatomy vagin Anatomy penis Anatomy prof students Anatomy videos medical...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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3
20

Ionizing air affects influenza virus infectivity and prevents airborne-transmission

By the use of a modified ionizer device we describe effective prevention of airborne transmitted influenza A (strain Panama 99) virus infection between animals and inactivation of virus (>97%).  
nature.com
about 4 years ago
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Antimicrobial drugs in CZ

Table of antimicrobial drugs (bacteria, viruses, parasites, mycological) for exam of the Medical microbiology in Czech republic. PS: It's in Czech.  
David Dufek
about 4 years ago
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Human Papilloma Virus - HPV

Epidemiology The most common STI in the UK Estimated that 10-20% of the population have a genital HPV infection, but only 1% of the population are symptomatic at any one time   Pathology The result of HPV infection. There are >100 types of HPV, and only several cause warts. HPV types 6 and 11 account for >90% of cases   Spread  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
almost 6 years ago
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Ebola Virus ,How The Virus Spreads - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Educational video describing the Ebola virus and how it is spread. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: http...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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I hate being on-call - I’m just not good at sleeping on the job

BOXING Day, 1.30am. “Are you the doctor on call?” I wrenched my reluctant brain from its REM state. “Yes.” “I’m worried about my wife. She’s 16 weeks pregnant and very gassy.” “Gassy?” “Burping and farting. Smells terrible! It’s keeping us both awake. I’m worried it could be serious.” By the time I ascertained that there were no sinister symptoms and that the likely culprit was the custard served with Christmas pudding (the patient was lactose intolerant), I was wide awake. My brain refused to power down for hours, as if out of spite for being so rudely aroused. I have a confession to make. When the Australian Federal Government announced that it was planning to abolish after-hours practice incentive payments, I was delighted. I know, I know, I should have been outraged along with the rest of you. After all, the RACGP predicted that after-hours care would be decimated if incentives were removed. Comparisons were made with the revamp of the UK system in 2004, which led to 90% of the profession opting out of after-hours work. Much as I sympathised, I was secretly rubbing my hands together with selfish glee. Surely this would mean that our semi-rural practice would stop doing all of our own on-call and free me from my after-hours responsibilities? I detest being on call. I loathe it with a passion completely out of proportion to the imposition it actually causes. I’m on call for the practice and our local hospital only once a week and the workload isn’t onerous. Middle-of-the-night calls aren’t all that frequent, but my sleep can be disturbed by their mere possibility, leaving me tired and cranky. If I’m forced suddenly into “brain on, work mode” by a phone call, I can kiss hours of precious slumber goodbye. I love to sleep, but, as with drawing and tennis, I’m not very good at it. I gaze with envy at those lucky devils who nap on public transport and fight malicious urges to disturb their peaceful repose. If I’m not supine, in a quiet, warm room, with loose-fitting clothing, a firm mattress and a pillow shaped just-so, I can forget any chance of sleep. Let’s just say I can relate to the Princess and the Pea story. I bet she wouldn’t have coped well with being phoned in the middle of the night either. If these nocturnal calls were all bona fide emergencies, I wouldn’t mind so much. It’s the crap that really riles me. I’ve received middle-of-the-night phone calls from patients who are constipated, patients with impacted cerumen (“Me ear’s blocked, Doc. I can’t sleep”) and patients with insomnia who want to know if it’s safe to take a second sedative. The call that took the on-call cake for me, though, was from a couple who woke me at 11.30 one night to settle an argument. “My husband says that bacteria are more dangerous than viruses but I reckon viruses are worse. After all, AIDS is a virus. Can you settle it for us so we can get some sleep? It would really help us out.” I kid you not. Genevieve Yates is an Australian GP, medical educator, medico-legal presenter and writer. You can read more of her work at http://genevieveyates.com  
Dr Genevieve Yates
about 6 years ago
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Diagnostic Pathology: Infectious Diseases

Diagnostic Pathology: Infectious Diseases takes a comprehensive look at infectious diseases, their anatomic manifestations, and how to ensure a complete and accurate sign out at the microscope. A user-friendly chapter landscape and thousands of high-quality images combine to make this medical reference book a key companion for the general surgical pathologist or resident in training. Comprehensive discussions on how to sign out cases. Formatted into sections by organism type (Virus, Bacteria, Fungi, and Parasite), and further divided by those that can be diagnosed on histological appearance. Species-specific pathologies for finding "zebra" cases.Essential information is listed in a bulleted format with numerous high-quality images to facilitate learning."Key Facts" highlight the quick criteria needed for diagnosis or adequacy evaluation at the time of a procedure.Features clear pictures of diagnostic forms, ancillary diagnostic tools, including microbiology and molecular diagnostics, pathological reaction patterns expected for given organisms, and important common and uncommon pathogens.Explains when and when not to use molecular diagnostics, and discusses histological limitations and how to address them at sign out.  
books.google.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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2
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Life and Death Battle | Curiosity: Battlefield Cell

Gym this is the final stage in an epic battle in one of the longest wars in human history it's a battle that rages inside each one of us every single day a trillion times over on this battlefield was once a healthy human cell now it's disintegrating into tiny pieces it a virus has overrun its defenses and unleashed an army of clones in army whose sole focus is to reproduce and destroy as many cells in our body as possible resulting in disease or even death now using the latest scientific research curiosity exposes this one's invisible world revealing as never before the life-and-death battle for a human cell  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
Viruses mind map
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Virus Mind Map

A basic virus mind map of the DNA and RNA viruses that I made. I may continue to add to it and publish a more detailed one in the future. The link should allow you to download the full PDF version. Hope it helps some people in microbiology! Viruses Mind Map  
medicalminded.com
almost 4 years ago
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Hepatitis C

This is unusual as hepatitis viruses go, as it very rarely causes acute infection. People will only become aware of infection when they develop serious liver disease later in life. 80% of those exposed to the virus will develop chronic infection. Spontaneous late clearance of the disease is very rare. Blood transfusion and blood products are a major means of transmission. It is also though that it can be sexually transmitted, but this is not particularly common.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
almost 6 years ago
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Hepatitis E

Hepatits E is clinically very similar to Hepatitis A.  Aetiology Water borne similar to hep A(shell fish and water melons!). 30% of dogs, rodents and pigs carry the virus Commonly seen in Asia and the Far East Presentation Very similar to that of hep A: Many patients are asymptomatic. They may never know they have had the disease Very rarely it can be lifethreatening May be a prodromal phase    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
almost 6 years ago