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Prevention Is Key in the 'War on Cancer'

Utilizing knowledge and understanding of cancer to drive prevention is the key to success in the war on cancer, say experts at a high-level healthcare forum.  
medscape.com
about 5 years ago
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South Sudan famine warning: Living on grass and leaves - BBC News

The BBC's Yalda Hakim reports from a village in Kaldak in the remote east of South Sudan to see the impact of the country's civil war, and finds people at risk of famine.  
bbc.co.uk
about 5 years ago
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Fiji needs an emergency ventilator and Dräger Australia answers the call!

Breath of life: Dräger supports Colonial War Memorial Hospital, Fiji with Oxylog ventilator. pic.twitter.com/mNzHjpgceq— Dräger (@DraegerNews) October 5, 2015 //platform.twitter.com/widgets.js Back in July this year.... Help! Anyone with oxylog 2000 charging cable,desperately needed for Fiji as can't use our vent.msg me if u can help. Please retweet.— anne creaton (@annecreaton) July 7, 2015 //platform.twitter.com/widgets.js Anne…  
prehospitalmed.com
about 5 years ago
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Culture Wars Drove Some States to Fund Stem Cell Research

At least seven states offer stem cell research funding or other incentives to scientists and industry. For many of those states, it appears to be worth the investment.  
medscape.com
about 5 years ago
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Life as a cancer nurse in Gaza's main hospital - BBC News

At the age of 27, Azza Jadalla has already lived through six wars - three in the past seven years alone. She is a cancer nurse in Gaza's main hospital, Al-Shifa.  
bbc.co.uk
about 5 years ago
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Risk of Death Nearly Doubled for Vietnam Veterans With PTSD

Higher than average death rates among Vietnam War veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suggest that combat trauma may still be affecting veterans' health even decades after the war, according to a new study.  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago
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Penis transplant plans for wounded US veterans - BBC News

Surgeons are set to carry out a penis transplant trial, the first of its kind in the United States, to help wounded war veterans.  
bbc.co.uk
almost 5 years ago
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10 Things you Need to Know about TBI by Knight - Intensive Care Network

Bill Knight tell you 10 things you need to know about TBI - traumatic brain injury. With Star Wars theming.  
intensivecarenetwork.com
almost 5 years ago
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Is direct laryngoscopy obsolete?

“I will unequivocally state that it is wrong for people to practice direct laryngoscopy in 2012.” -Ron Walls, MD Professor, Emergency Medicine Harvard Medical School So it began, the VL vs DL wars! Here is a nice update on the battle: Is direct laryngoscopy obsolete?  
prehospitalmed.com
almost 5 years ago
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Refugee Crisis: Experts Mobilize to Provide Mental Health Care

International experts step up to help Syrian refugees heal from the psychological effects of war.  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago
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Jeremy Hunt’s war on junior doctors leaves them little choice | Letters

Letters: Doctors typically may be ‘junior’ for five to 15 years, and this is often extended – many working in our hospitals are in their 40s and 50s  
theguardian.com
almost 5 years ago
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#OnCall4Syria: A local health advocacy initiative

Since 2011, the Syrian Civil War has forced millions to flee their homeland. Over 4 million Syrians are currently seeking refuge in neighbouring countries, with an additional 7.6 million people internally displaced. The United Nations considers this the worst refugee crisis in twenty years and an adequate international response is imperative. With the newly-elected federal…  
prehospitalmed.com
almost 5 years ago
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C difficile Infection: The Battle Continues

We have no new weapons, but recent studies from Veterans Affairs hospitals provide encouraging and useful strategies for clinicians on the front lines of the war against C difficile.  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago
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Raymond Bernard Cattell - R. B. Cattell - Raymond Cattell

   Raymond Bernard Cattell was born in Hilltop, West Bromwich, England, a town near Birmingham on March 20, 1905. His father was a mechanical engineer and craftsman-designer who worked on such projects as developing World War I military equipment, the steam engine, and a new internal combustion engine. His mother was the daughter of a successful manufacturer in Birmingham. The family’s economic circumstances allowed them to choose to move to the south coast of Devon when Cattell was six years old. His boyhood on the beautiful coastal country of Devon imbued in him a lifelong love of the sea and sailing ships. Cattell describes a happy childhood and youth both at home and at school, which upon comparison with other behavior and personality theorists, is an unusual situation. His parents were exacting about the standards of performance that they expected from their children but permissive regarding how the children spent their leisure time. Cattell, his brothers, and friends, spent a great deal of time outdoors sailing, swimming, exploring caves, and fighting mock battles over terrain in which they “occasionally drowned or fell over cliffs”. England had entered World War I when Cattell was nine, an event that profoundly influenced him. During the war a mansion near his home had been converted into a hospital where Cattell observed trainloads of wounded men transported directly from the battlefields of France. He wrote that as a result of his experience, he became unusually serious for a young boy and aware of the “brevity of life and the need to accomplish while one might”. The great dedication to his work and the long hours that he devoted to it during his life may well have had their origins at this time. (Cattell, Lindzey, ed., Pg. 52-63.) These work characteristics of Cattell may also have been reinforced by the competition with his older brother. He describes the difficulties in trying to establish his own freedom of development in the presence of a domineering brother three years his senior who could “be outwitted, but not overcome”.  
stthomasu.ca
almost 5 years ago
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Life and Death Battle | Curiosity: Battlefield Cell

Gym this is the final stage in an epic battle in one of the longest wars in human history it's a battle that rages inside each one of us every single day a trillion times over on this battlefield was once a healthy human cell now it's disintegrating into tiny pieces it a virus has overrun its defenses and unleashed an army of clones in army whose sole focus is to reproduce and destroy as many cells in our body as possible resulting in disease or even death now using the latest scientific research curiosity exposes this one's invisible world revealing as never before the life-and-death battle for a human cell  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
Www.bmj
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A champion for medicine’s humanity

“Man’s inhumanity to man, Makes countless thousands mourn,” wrote Robert Burns in 1784. Evidence of that inhumanity is all around us, in reports from the world’s war zones, the refugee crisis in the Middle East and Europe, and closer to home wherever we are. This week, with the annual celebration of Burns’s birthday, we also celebrate your support for a charity whose volunteers provide healthcare to vulnerable people suffering the effects of inhumanity.  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
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Interventions for reducing risks and promoting inclusion of street children and young people | Cochrane

Millions of children and young people are estimated to be living and working on streets around the world. Many demonstrate considerable resilience and strong coping skills but continue to be vulnerable to risks. To provide best chances for them in life, services are needed to reduce risks and prevent marginalisation from mainstream society. Thirteen studies have rigorously evaluated 19 interventions such as services to support street-connected children and youth - all in high-income countries. Most have compared therapy-based services versus usual shelter and drop-in services, or versus other therapeutic/health interventions. We found mixed results among these studies but overall findings suggesting that participants receiving therapy and those provided usual services benefitted to a similar level. Future research should consider the benefits of usual drop-in and shelter services, most particularly in low- and middle-income countries, and should focus on street-connected children and young people. None of the studies included participants comparable with street children in low-income countries, who may be on the street primarily to earn a living, or as a result of war, migration or urbanisation. Overall we assessed the quality of the evidence included in this review as low/moderate.  
cochrane.org
almost 5 years ago
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Brazil Zika virus: 'War' declared on deadly mosquitoes - BBC News

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff declares war on mosquitoes responsible for spreading the Zika virus in a recorded TV message to the nation.  
bbc.co.uk
almost 5 years ago
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Junior doctors' dispute could become a war, union warns - BBC News

The dispute over the imposition of a new contract for junior doctors "could become a war" between NHS staff, employers and the government, a union warns.  
bbc.co.uk
almost 5 years ago
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'Releasing the Dogs’ in the Body’s War on Cancer

Drs Lou Weiner and Chris Heery vividly describe strategies that prompt the immune system to attack and kill cancer cells, and offer a view from the trenches of cancer immunotherapy.  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago