New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

Preview
0
0

The teenagers who poison themselves - BBC News

The number of young women in the UK who are poisoning themselves is reportedly on the rise. Why do they do it?  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
6

Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women -- US

This is the first in what will be a weekly reporting by the CDC of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection in U.S. states and territories. What are the latest numbers?  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome – Don't Forget the Bubbles

Alcohol use is common in Australian women with surveys suggesting that around 90% of 18-45 year olds have had a drink in the last year and that around 39% of these are unaware of the health implications of drinking on the developing fetus. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is a leading cause of preventable intellectual disability. An Australian diagnostic guide has recently been developed by the Telethon Kids Institute to help clinicians make the diagnosis of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorders. In this post we cover some of the basics of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and provide some resources for those who want to learn more.  
dontforgetthebubbles.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Why Ob/Gyns Need to Talk to Patients About Fertility

Many women are unaware of age-related decline in ovarian reserve, one fertility specialist says.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
7

HPV Screening for Cervical Cancer With an Extended Interval

Are women less inclined to stay current with cervical cancer screening when the interval between screenings is increased?  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
7

PCOS: Weight Loss Before Fertility Treatment Ups Birth Rates

Overweight or obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome and infertility were more likely to get pregnant if they lost weight before beginning infertility treatment, a new study suggested.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
7

Young Female Cancer Survivors Not Clear on Infertility Risks

Many young women who survive cancer don't understand how tumor treatments affect their reproductive health even though the therapy can trigger infertility, a survey suggests.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
7

Mammographic Breast Density in Infertile and Parous Women

Do patients with primary infertility have denser breast tissue, and are they at an increased risk for breast cancer?  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
2

Woman's bid to use deceased daughter's eggs continues - BBC News

A 60-year-old woman who wants to use her late daughter's frozen eggs to give birth to her own grandchild is continuing her legal battle.  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
2

Inducing labour in women with suspected large babies shows benefits

Inducing labour in women with suspected large babies reduces birth fractures and mean birth weight and does not increase the rate of caesarean section or instrumental birth, a Cochrane review has found.1  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
6

Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus (1992[1]) is a book written by American author and relationship counselor John Gray. The book has sold more than 50 million copies and, according to CNN, it was the "highest ranked work of non-fiction" of the 1990s,[2] spending 121 weeks on the bestseller list. The book and its central metaphor have become a part of popular culture and the foundation for the author's subsequent books, recordings, seminars, theme vacations, one-man Broadway show, TV sitcom, workout videos, a podcast, men's and ladies' apparel lines, fragrances, travel guides and his-and-hers salad dressings.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
1

Mum gives birth to ‘heaviest baby’ in India, weighing 15lb - BBC News

An Indian woman gives birth to a 15lb (6.82kg) baby girl, who doctors say could be the heaviest child ever born in the country.  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Telephone-Based CBT Improves Menopause-Related Insomnia

Insomnia decreased while other sleep measures improved after 8 weeks of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
13
0
0

World Health Assembly agrees resolutions on women, children and adolescents, and healthy ageing

World Health Assembly press release on 2 resolutions: women, children and adolescents, and healthy ageing.  
who.int
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
4

Light Alcohol Consumption: Predictor of Fatty Liver in MetS

New research studies whether minimal alcohol intake is protective against fatty liver in women with metabolic syndrome.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
8

Alcohol and Risk of Breast Cancer and Coronary Heart Disease

Results of this large cohort study support the hypotheses that alcohol is associated with both breast cancer and coronary heart disease in older women--but in opposite directions.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
1
1
10

SHOULD THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH REMOVE ITS BAN ON ARTIFICIAL METHODS OF FAMILY PLANNING?

This is a question faced by many catholic health care providers throughout the world. The Roman Catholic Church officially opposes any artificial method of family planning. When Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio became the new leader of the Roman Catholic Church (Church from here on) in February 2013 as Pope Francis, catholics all over the world were encouraged by the idea that they might see some changes in the teachings of the Church as it relates to many issues pertaining to the “family”. These issues include divorce, remarriage, homosexuality, family planning and a number of other topics. I want to focus in this discussion on the longstanding opposition by the Church to the use of artificial methods of family planning (contraception). This ban on contraception affects catholic medical practitioners on a daily basis and this includes, family doctors, RNs, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and any medical care giver involved with counseling clients about methods for planning their families and implementing the chosen methods. As we know, the Church allows only “natural methods” of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods”. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. The hope for a change in this official position of the Church has been fostered by the observation that Pope Francis seemed to be willing to listen and has made a number conciliatory remarks on issues like women’s equality, divorced and remarried couples and homosexuality, while continuing to accept only the natural methods of family planning. Then came the most recent publication by Pope Francis, “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This is a beautifully written document about issues related to the family, in which the Pope makes again conciliatory remarks about a number of issues, but reaffirms the position of the Church in regards to family planning. No artificial methods are condoned. This seems to close the door on this issue, at least for the foreseeable future. What a pity and what a missed opportunity for the Pope to bring the teachings of the Church as it pertains to contraception in line with the thinking and practice of the 21st century. It is well known, and adequate statistics are available to show that worldwide a large percentage of catholics are ignoring the teaching of the church as it pertains to family planning and availing themselves of contraception to plan their families. On a personal note I have spoken to a number of priests and asked them about my practice as a catholic obstetrician and gynecologist of prescribing and implementing artificial contraception for my catholic clients. Some of them have told me to following my conscience and continue what I am doing. That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing. In this regard the recent publication from the Wiingaards Institute for Catholic Research might be of interest: http://www.catholicsandcontraception.com William J. LeMaire MD Emeritus Professor Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Miami, Florida  
DR William LeMaire
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
2

Atrial fibrillation in women is linked to increased risk of cancer

Women with new onset atrial fibrillation may have an elevated risk of cancer, shows a study including nearly 35 000 women who were followed up for around 20 years. The researchers said in JAMA Cardiology that atrial fibrillation may be a risk marker for future cancer diagnoses.1  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Dr Heimlich saves choking woman with manoeuvre he invented - BBC News

The 96-year-old man behind the Heimlich manoeuvre has used the technique to save a woman choking at his retirement home.  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
8

Dr Heimlich: 'Piece of meat came out and she started breathing' - BBC News

Dr Henry Heimlich has used the Heimlich manoeuvre to save a choking woman at his retirement home.  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago