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9a05869467d5a28eaaac6f5aa5fcf8de68f3de787885320686688417
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Everything you need to know about abdominal x-rays in 5 minutes

Dr Dan Rogers, University Hospitals of Leicester  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
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Medical Student Apps: Chest X-ray Interpretation (for beginners)

This video tutorial has been made for use with Medical Student Apps: Chest Xrays, an application for the iPhone and iPad. Download the app here for free: htt...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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16
773

An interesting chest x-ray

Case-based X-ray Interpretation with Questions.  
Anna-Maria Paes
over 6 years ago
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12
1158

Pleural effusion x-ray (left-sided)

This PA Chest X-Ray demonstrates a left sided pleural effusion. In this condition fluid collects between the parietal and visceral pleura and appears as a shadowy fluid level on the X-Ray with obliteration of the costophrenic angles. If you were to examine this patient they might be in respiratory distress from reduced oxygen uptake (so have low sats, high resp rate, possible cyanosis and accessory muscle useage) - they may have reduced chest expansion on the affected side and it would be stony dull to percussion. Fluid transmits sound poorly so breath sounds would be decreased as would vocal resonance/fremitus. Someone with consolidation may have very similar clinical findings but the underlying area of lung is almost solid due to pus from the infective process - as sounds travel well through solids they would have increased vocal fremitus which is how you can clinically differentiate between the two conditions. Clinical examination and understanding of conditions is paramount to practice effective medicine. Before you recieved this X-Ray you should be able to diagnose the condition and use the X-Ray to confirm your suspicions.  
Rhys Clement
almost 10 years ago
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11
349

Commonly missed Fractures

Cases with Xrays and Questions Fractures that even Emergency doctors miss. Don't forget to examine soft tissues!  
Anna-Maria Paes
over 6 years ago
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9
698

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm X-Ray

In this X-Ray you can see the faint outline of a very large AAA. It is important that you specifically look for this feature on an Abdominal X-Ray as this can be a potentially life threatening condition.  
Rhys Clement
almost 10 years ago
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9
509

CXR - left sided pneumothorax and surgical emphysema

In this Chest X-Ray we can identify a left sided pneumothorax - there is absence of lung markings in the periphery and we can also see a shadow which outlines the edge of the lung. A pneumothorax is caused when air enters the potential space between the viceral and parietal pleura and causes the lung to collapse down under the pressure of it's elsatic recoil. In this case it is likely that the pneumothorax has been caused by trauma as we can see air in the soft tissues on the left side (surgical emphysema - clinically feels like bubble wrap). A pneumothorax can be a life threatening condition. The patient presents in respiratory distress with decreased expansion on the affected side. There will be hyperresonance to percussion on that side but absent breath sounds. The emergency treatment is decompression with a large bore cannula in the 2nd intercostal space mid-clavicular line followed by insertion a chest drain in the 5th intercostal space mid-axilllary line  
Rhys Clement
almost 10 years ago
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How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 2 - A Systematic Method and Anatomy)

A description of a systematic method for examining a chest X-ray, and a review of the relevant thoracic anatomy.  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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9
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How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 1 - An Introduction)

An introduction to the interpretation of chest X-rays, covering the basic principles of using X-rays in medical imaging, as well as the conventional X-ray vi...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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8
440

What constitutes the borders of the mediastinal shadow in a chest x-ray?

This video is part of a playlist of short videos which are intended to combine multiple choice questions' answering experience with an improved understanding...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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7
227

X-ray of old TB

as per the above  
Mr Jamie Dunn
over 9 years ago
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6
305

Abdominal X-Ray - Small bowel obstruction

Small bowel obstruction can be identified by the dilated loops of centrally placed bowel with the venae commitantes (circular bands of muscle) that span the entire width of the bowel as opposed to tenae coli in the large bowel which only span part of it.  
Rhys Clement
almost 10 years ago
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Chest x-Ray

Left Sided Pleural effusion. The most common cause of this presentation is malignancy. It is important to consider the source of a possible primary. It may also be necessary to obtain a sample of the effusion fluid to determine whether it is a transudate or an exudate, using Light's criteria as a guide. Exudate contains greater levels of protein than a transudate reflecting it's often inflammatory origin as the blood vessels become 'leaky' to protein molecules. The differential diagnosis for bilateral pleural effusions is different again. Consider 'failure' e.g. heart, renal or hepatic.  
Tim Ritzmann
almost 10 years ago
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How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 5 - Cardiac Silhouette and Mediastinum)

A review of cardiomegaly, left atrial and right ventricular enlargement, mediastinal masses, and hilar enlargement. Video includes the following images (amon...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 vvr5q9?1444774253
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Clinics - Making the most of it

Commencing the first clinical year is a milestone. Things will now be different as your student career steers straight into the unchartered waters of clinical medicine. New challenges and responsibilities lie ahead and not just in an academic sense. After all this is the awaited moment, the start of the apprenticeship you have so desired and laboured for. It won’t be long before these clinical years like the preclinical years before them, will seem just as distant and insular, so why not make the most of it? The first days hold so much excitation and promise and for many they deliver, however, it would be wise not to be too optimistic. I am afraid your firm head standing abreast the doors in a prophetic splaying of arms is an unlikely sight. In this new clinical environment, it is natural to be a little flummoxed. The quizzical looks of doctors and nurses as you first walk in, a sure sign of your unexpected arrival, is a recurring theme. If the wards are going to be your new hunting ground, proper introductions with the medical team are in order. This might seem like a task of Herculean proportions, particularly in large teaching hospitals. Everyone is busy. Junior doctors scuttling around the ward desks job lists in hand, the registrar probably won’t have noticed you and as luck would have it your consultant firm head is away at a conference. Perseverance during these periods of frustration is a rewarding quality. Winning over the junior doctors with some keenness will help you no end. What I mean to say is that their role in our learning as students extends further than the security of sign-off signatures a week before the end of the rotation. They will give you opportunities. Take them! Although it never feels like it at the time, being a medical student does afford some privileges. The student badge clipped to your new clinic clothes is a license to learn: to embark on undying streaks of false answers, to fail as many skills and clerkings as is required and to do so unabashed. Unfortunately, the junior doctors are not there purely for your benefit, they cannot always spare the time to directly observe a history taking or an examination, instead you must report back. With practice this becomes more of a tick box exercise: gleaning as much information and then reconfiguring it into a structured presentation. However, the performance goes unseen and unheard. I do not need to iterate the inherent dangers of this practice. Possible solutions? Well receiving immediate feedback is more obtainable on GP visits or at outpatient clinics. They provide many opportunities to test your questioning style and bedside manner. Performing under scrutiny recreates OSCE conditions. Due to time pressure and no doubt the diagnostic cogs running overtime, it is fatefully easy to miss emotional cues or derail a conversation in a way which would be deemed insensitive. Often it occurs subconsciously so take full advantage of a GP or a fellow firm mate’s presence when taking a history. Self-directed learning will take on new meaning. The expanse of clinical knowledge has a vertiginous effect. No longer is there a structured timetable of lectures as a guide; for the most part you are alone. Teaching will become a valued commodity, so no matter how sincere the promises, do not rest until the calendars are out and a mutually agreed time is settled. I would not encourage ambuscaded attacks on staff but taking the initiative to arrange dedicated tutorial time with your superiors is best started early. Consigning oneself to the library and ploughing through books might appear the obvious remedy, it has proven effective for the last 2-3 years after all. But unfortunately it can not all be learnt with bookwork. Whether it is taking a psychiatric history, venipuncture or reading a chest X-ray, these are perishable skills and only repeated and refined practice will make them become second nature. Balancing studying with time on the wards is a challenge. Unsurprisingly, after a day spent on your feet, there is wavering incentive to merely open a book. Keeping it varied will prevent staleness taking hold. Attending a different clinic, brushing up on some pathology at a post-mortem or group study sessions adds flavour to the daily routine. During the heated weeks before OSCEs, group study becomes very attractive. While it does cement clinical skills, do not be fooled. Your colleagues tend not to share the same examination findings you would encounter on an oncology ward nor the measured responses of professional patient actors. So ward time is important but little exposure to all this clinical information will be gained by assuming a watchful presence. Attending every ward round, while a laudable achievement, will not secure the knowledge. Senior members of the team operate on another plane. It is a dazzling display of speed whenever a monster list of patients comes gushing out the printer. Before you have even registered each patient’s problem(s), the management plan has been dictated and written down. There is little else to do but feed off scraps of information drawn from the junior doctors on the journey to the next bed. Of course there will be lulls, when the pace falls off and there is ample time to digest a history. Although it is comforting to have the medical notes to check your findings once the round is over, it does diminish any element of mystery. The moment a patient enters the hospital is the best time to cross paths. At this point all the work is before the medical team, your initial guesses might be as good as anyone else’s. Visiting A&E of your own accord or as part of your medical team’s on call rota is well worth the effort. Being handed the initial A&E clerking and gingerly drawing back the curtain incur a chilling sense of responsibility. Embrace it, it will solidify not only clerking skills but also put into practice the explaining of investigations or results as well as treatment options. If you are feeling keen you could present to the consultant on post-take. Experiences like this become etched in your memory because of their proactive approach. You begin to remember conditions associated with patient cases you have seen before rather than their corresponding pages in the Oxford handbook. And there is something about the small thank you by the F1 or perhaps finding your name alongside theirs on the new patient list the following morning, which rekindles your enthusiasm. To be considered part of the medical team is the ideal position and a comforting thought. Good luck. This blog post is a reproduction of an article published in the Medical Student Newspaper, Freshers 2013 issue.  
James Wong
over 5 years ago
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5
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Chest X-ray - BSCC

Describing the chest X-ray (CXR) on the flight deck - and in your examinations. Basic science in clinical context BSCC  
lifeinthefastlane.com
about 4 years ago
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Hip fracture xray

 
Dr Alastair Buick
about 3 years ago
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Chest X-ray

Note the calcified granuloma in the right upper zone (an important differential being malignancy). Note also the left lower lobe collapse ('sail sign' behind the heart). If you look closely you will see the abscence of the lower ribs leading you to the conclusion that the patient has, at some point, undergone a thoracotomy. You can also see surgical clips in the stomach.  
Tim Ritzmann
almost 10 years ago
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Psoas Line on Abdominal X-ray

This is the psoas line seen on an abdominal x-ray. Original image is from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d0/Medical_X-Ray_imaging_ALP02_nevit.jpg  
Dr Alastair Buick
almost 7 years ago
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4
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Radiology Masterclass - X-ray Courses Online. Take a Radiology Masterclass course online today and gain a verifiable certificate of course completion to boost your portfolio.

Radiology Masterclass Courses. Online X-ray courses accredited by the Royal College of Radiologists, London, UK. Register for online X-ray courses provided by Radiology Masterclass.  
radiologymasterclass.co.uk
over 5 years ago