Do thromboembolic strokes cause loss of vision in just one eye?

I am trying to work out when thromboembolic strokes would cause loss of vision in just one eye because it seems to be that most of the time is causes homonymous hemianopia.

Anyone got an ideas? Thanks!

Authored By Katy Kershaw on Monday 12th November 2012

Responses

Dr Luma Khalid
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Posted almost 7 years ago

Visual loss caused by thromboembolic strokes generally present with defects in visual fields. However stroke involving the occipital cortex can present with complete or partial loss of vision, a condition known as cortical blindness. And sometimes they

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Peter Calvert
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Medical Student - Lancaster
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Posted almost 7 years ago

As an addition to the answer by Dr Luma Khalid:

Patients with risk factors for strokes may also suffer unilateral blindness due to a thromboembolism lodging in the central retinal artery (e.g. a thrombus forming in the heart due to AF may embol

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Alastair Burden
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Medical Student
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Posted almost 7 years ago

The only really conceivable way for this to happen would be if the emboli lodged in a vessel which supplied a structure in the optic tract between the retina and the optic chiazm. ie. central retinal artery, vessels supporting the optic nerve (CNII), e

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Jim McHugh
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Posted over 6 years ago

Any thrombolembolic event posterior to the optic chiasm will cause homonymous hemianopia/quadrantanopia, ie loss of part of the vision in both eyes.

  • Refer new homonymous field loss to TIA clinic if it's fully resolved, or on-call str
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Iñigo de Noriega Echevarría
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Posted almost 7 years ago

I agree. All in all it depends on the territory affected by the emboli

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