Why is a nerve impulse conducted saltatorily faster than that conducted along an unmyelinated fibre?

The Na+ have to diffuse along the same route to depolarize the membrane, be it myelinated or not, they have to go the same distance to depolarize a particular point on the axolemma. To cause an action potential at one node of Ranvier, the Na+ have to diffuse from the former node to the latter, again, defining the same distance on the unmyelinated fibre. So how is it possible?

Authored By Rama Raja on Monday 3rd December 2012

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Dr. Luke Farmery
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Foundation Doctor (2) - St Richards Hospital
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Posted almost 8 years ago

Saltatory Condunction refers to the conduction of nerve impulses along myelinated fibres. These impulses 'jump' along the nerve fibre from each 'node of ranvier*' effectively skipping parts of the axon and thus travelling faster down th

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Miss Luna Ibrahim
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Medical Student - Warwick
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Posted almost 8 years ago

The difference in speed is due to different methods of conduction.

In the unmyelinated axon the AP reaches for example point A and causes a depolarisation of the cell membrane, this depolarisation of the membrane causes a local current which ch

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