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#81
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2
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History Taking (2 of 3) - Clinical Skills 101

We've had a great response to our first set of videos, so we're thrilled to hear some of you are finding them helpful! Since then we've had a few requests to...  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
#82
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19
656

Psychiatry Presentation

This is a powerpoint presentation I created on Psychiatry recently. All information is taken from NICE guidelines and MIMs guides. If any information is incorrect let me know! Pictures are from google. This was a bit of a slog to make truth be told and it is a LONG presentation, but I feel most of the information that is relevant to sitting final written exams is in there. I hope it helps!  
Conrad Hayes
almost 6 years ago
#83
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3
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History Taking (3 of 3) - Clinical Skills 101

We've had a great response to our first set of videos, so we're thrilled to hear some of you are finding them helpful! Since then we've had a few requests to...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
#84
Foo20151013 2023 1vzj1mi?1444774262
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Wikipedia - help or hindrance?

It’s quick, it’s easy and we’ve all done it. Don’t blush, whether it’s at our leisure or behind the consultant’s back we can confess to having used the world’s sixth most popular website. You might have seen it, sitting pride of place on the podium of practically any Google result page. Of course, it’s the tell tale sign of one of Web 2.0’s speediest and most successful offspring, Wikipedia. Now for fear of patronizing a generation who have sucked on the teat of this resource since its fledgling years, the formalities will remain delightfully short. Wikipedia is the free, multilingual, online encyclopedia, which harnesses the collective intelligence of the world’s internet users to produce a collaboratively written and openly modifiable body of knowledge. The technology it runs on is a highly flexible web application called wiki. It is open-source software; hence the explosion of wiki sites all united under the banner of combined authorship. Anyone with internet access can edit the content and do so with relative anonymity. It would be unthinkable that a source, which does not prioritize the fidelity of its content, could possibly play a role in medical education. How ironic it seems that medical students can waste hours pondering which textbook to swear their allegiance for the forthcoming rotation, yet not spare a second thought typing their next medical query into Wikipedia. Evidently it has carved itself a niche and not just among medical students, but healthcare professionals as well. According to a small qualitative study published in the International Journal of Medical Informatics, 70% of their sample, which comprised of graduates from London medical schools currently at FY2 and ST1 level, used Wikipedia in a given week for ‘clinical purposes’. These ranged from general background reading to double checking a differential and looking up medications. We are so ensnared by the allure of instantaneous enlightenment; it’s somewhat comparable to relieving an itch. "Just Google it..." is common parlance. We need that quick fix. When the consultant asks about his or her favourite eponymous syndrome or you’re a little short on ammunition before a tutorial, the breadth and ease-of-use offered by a service accessible from our phones is a clandestine escape. The concept of Wikipedia, the idea that its articles are in a way living bodies because of the continual editing process, is its strength. Conversely textbooks are to a degree outmoded by the time they reach their publication date. While I commend the contributors of Wikipedia for at least trying to bolster their pages with references to high impact journals, it does not soften the fact that the authorship is unverifiable. Visitors, lay people, registered members under some less than flattering pseudonyms such as Epicgenius and Mean as custard, don’t impart the sense of credibility students (or for that matter patients)expect from an encyclopedia. Since the prestige of direct authorship if off the cards, it does beg the question of what is their motivation and I’m afraid ‘the pursuit of knowledge and improving humanity’s lot' is the quaint response. There is a distinct lack of transparency. It has become a playground where a contributor can impress his/her particular theory regarding a controversial subject unchallenged. Considering there is no direct ownership of the article, who then has the authority to curate the multiple theories on offer and portray a balanced view? Does an edit war ensue? It is not unheard of for drug representatives to tailor articles detailing their product and erase the less pleasant side-effects. Obviously Wikipedia is not unguarded, defences are in place and there is such a thing as quality control. Recent changes will come under the scrutiny of more established editors, pages that are particularly prone to vandalism are vetted and there are a special breed of editors called administrators, who uphold a custodial post, blocking and banishing rebellious editors. A study featured in the First Monday journal put Wikipedia to the test by deliberately slipping minor errors into the entries of past philosophers. Within 48 hours half of these errors had been addressed. Evidently, the service has the potential to improve over time; provided there is a pool of committed and qualified editors. Wikiproject Medicine is such a group of trusted editors composed primarily of doctors, medical students, nurses, clinical scientists and patients. Since 2004, its two hundred or so participants have graded an excess of 25,000 health-related articles according to quality parameters not dissimilar to peer review. However, the vast majority of articles are in a state of intermediate quality, somewhere between a stub and featured article. Having some degree of professional input towards a service as far reaching as Wikipedia will no doubt have an impact on global health, particularly in developing countries where internet access is considered a luxury. March this year saw the medical pages of the English Wikipedia reach a lofty 249,386,264 hits. Its ubiquity is enviable; it maintains a commanding lead over competing medical websites. The accessibility of this information has catapulted Wikipedia far beyond its scope as a humble encyclopedia and into a medical resource. Patients arrive to clinics armed with the printouts. As future doctors we will have to be just that one step ahead, to recognise the limitations of a source that does not put a premium on provenance but is nevertheless the current public health tool of choice. Illustrator Edward Wong This blog post is a reproduction of an article published in the Medical Student Newspaper, November 2013 issue.  
James Wong
about 5 years ago
#85
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2
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Bacteria Basics : Microbiology Lectures

Bacteria Basics : Microbiology Lectures In this new video we look at the basics of bacteria. We look at their classifications, sizes, shapes and how they rep...  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
#86
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3
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Hepatitis B

Epidemiology and Aetiology Major health problem – 300 million carriers Incubation 1 - 4 mths Parenteral transmission – sexual, IV, perinatal 0.5% of UK population are carriers, but this is as much as 10-15% in some countries in the developing world. in some far eastern countries, 1/3 of people are carriers. E.g. in Yemen ¼ of the population have hep B PresentationAcute Hepatitis B    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
about 5 years ago
#87
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Immunology - MHC I Processing

https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twit...  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
#88
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5
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Echocardiography Online Course

123 Sonography is the #1 provider of online echocardiography training. Thousands of physicians and sonographers have learned echo from us. Register for our free course!  
123sonography.com
almost 4 years ago
#89
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1
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02 - Assessment of muscle tone after stroke

This resource is from the Stroke Training and Awareness Resources (STARs) website - http://www.stroketraining.org Copyright © Chest Heart & Stroke Scotland a...  
youtube.com
7 months ago
#90
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2
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Intro to EKG Interpretation - How to Identify Any Tachyarrhythmia with 6 Easy Questions

An approach to the differential diagnosis of tachyarrhythmias based upon EKG characteristics.  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
#91
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Endometriosis

 
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
about 5 years ago
#92
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3
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Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Mnemonics | IMnotebook.com

> Myocardial infarct, complications ABCDE x2 Arrhythmias / AneurysmBradycardia / ↓BPCardiac failure / cardiac tamponadeDresslers / Death!Embolism / Extra (VSD, pap muscle rupture)   
imnotebook.com
almost 4 years ago
#93
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Cadiac Axis Determination – Part 1

Cardiac Rhythm Analysis, 12-Lead ECG Interpretation, Resuscitation  
ems12lead.com
over 3 years ago
#94
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Doing more with less: own Pride and Joy.

“There is nothing new under the sun” - Ecclesiastes 1:4-11. If any of you have read one of my blogs before you will have realised that I am a huge fan of books. The blog I am writing today is also about a book, but more than that, it is about an idea. The idea is simple, practical and nothing especially new. It is an idea that many call common sense but few call common practice. It is an idea that has been used in every sort of organisation for over 20 years. It is an idea that needs to be applied on a greater scale to the health service. The idea is not new. How the book is written is not new. But how the book explains the idea and applies it to healthcare is new and it will change how you view the health service. It is a revolutionary book. The book is called “Pride and Joy” by Alex Knight view here. How I came to read this book is a classic story of a Brownian motion (a chance encounter), leading to an altered life trajectory. The summer before starting medical school I was working as a labourer cleaning out a chaps guttering. During a tea break in the hot summer sun he asked me what I was going to study at Uni. As soon as I said “Medicine”, he said “then you need to come see this”. He took me into his office and showed me a presentation he had given the year before about a hospital in Ireland. He was a management consultant and had been applying a management theory he had learned while working in industry. With his help the hospital had managed to reduce waiting times by a huge amount. The management theory he was applying is called "The Theory of Constraints" (TOC). I thought that his presentation was fascinating and I could not understand why it was not more widely applied. I went away and read the books he suggested and promised that I would stay in touch. Four years later and I had been exposed to enough of the clinical environment to realise that something needs to change in how the health service is run. To this end, a couple of colleagues and myself founded the Birmingham Medical Leadership society (BMLS) with help from the Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management (FMLM). The aim of which is to help healthcare students and professionals understand the systems they are working in. The first thing I did after founding the society was contact that friendly management consultant and ask him for his advice on what we should cover. He immediately put me in contact with QFI consulting, @QFIConsulting. This small firm has been working with hospitals all over the world to implement this simple theory called the Theory of Constraints. They were absolutely fantastic and within 2 emails had promised to come to Birmingham to run a completely free workshop for our society’s members. The workshop was on March 8th at Birmingham Medical School. Through our society’s contacts we managed to encourage 15 local students to take a revision break to attend the workshop on a sunny Saturday. We were also able to find 11 local registrars/ consultants who wanted to improve their management knowledge. It just so happens that the chap leading this workshop was Mr Alex Knight. The workshop sparked all of our interests and when he mentioned that he had just written a book, pretty much the whole crowd asked for a copy. When I got my copy, I thought I would leave it to read for after my end of year exams. However, I got very bored a few days before the first written paper and needed a revision break – so I decided that reading a few pages here and there wouldn't hurt. Trouble was that this book was a page turner and I soon couldn't put it down. I won’t spoil the book for all of you out there, who I hope will read it. I shall just say that if you are interested in healthcare, training to work in healthcare, already work in healthcare or just want a riveting book to read by the pool then you really should read it. The basic premise is that healthcare is getting more expensive and yet there appears to be an increase in the number of healthcare crises'. So if more money isn't making healthcare better, then maybe it is time to try a different approach. “Marketing is what you do when your product is no good” – Edward Land, inventor of the Polaroid Camera. Mr Land was a wise man and I can happily say that I have no conflict of interest in writing this blog. I have not been promised anything in return for this glowing review. The only reason that I have written this is because I believe it is important for people to have a greater understanding of how the health service works and what we can do to make it even better! As a very junior healthcare professional, there is not much that we can do on a practical level but that does not mean we are impotent. We can still share best practice and show our enthusiasm for new approaches. Healthcare students and professionals, if you care about how your service works and you want to help make it better. Please find a copy of this book and read it. It won’t take you long and I promise that it will have an impact on you. NB - Note all of the folded down corners. These pages have something insightful that I want to read again... there are a lot of folded pages!  
jacob matthews
about 5 years ago