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New(er) Podcasts in Emergency Medicine - The Teaching Course

Hey folks, welcome back to the  iTeachEM blog! I've been on a bit of a break...just moved from Maryland to the great state of Kentucky and joined the facul  
iteachem.net
almost 7 years ago
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April 2015 "Skeptical Edition" REBELCast - R.E.B.E.L. EM - Emergency Medicine Blog

Welcome back to a "skeptical edition" of REBELCast where we will discuss if active Compression Decompression CPR with Augmentation of Negative Intrathoracic Pressure for Treatment of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest is superior to standard CPR?  
rebelem.com
almost 7 years ago
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The Case of the Balanced Solution - EM Nerd

Saline-based resuscitation strategies were first proposed as far back as 1831 during the Cholera Epidemic. In an article published in the Lancet in 1831, Dr. O’Shaughnessy suggests the use of injected salts into the venous system as a means of combating the dramatic dehydration seen in patients afflicted with this bacterial infection(1). Saline’s potential harms were first observed in post-surgical patients who after receiving large volumes of saline based resuscitation fluids during surgery were found to have a hyperchloremic acidosis (2). Though these changes appear transient and clinically trivial, it is theorized that when applied to the critically ill, the deleterious effects on renal blood flow may increase the rate of permanent renal impairment and even death. Unfortunately, no large prospective trials have demonstrated this hypothesis to be anything more than physiological reasoning. Small prospective trials have exhibited trivial trends in decreased renal blood flow, kidney function, and increased acidosis, though these perturbations were fleeting and of questionable clinical relevance (3, 4, 5, 6, 7). A larger retrospective study, bringing all the biases such trials are known to carry, demonstrated small improvements in mortality of ICU patients treated with a balanced fluid strategy, though it failed to demonstrate improvements in renal function (the theoretical model used to support balanced fluid administration) (8). In 2012 Yonus et al were the first to attempt to prospectively answer this question in an ICU population. Published in JAMA, on first glance the results seemed to vindicate those in support of the use of balanced fluids (9). Yet despite its superficial success, a closer look reveals this trial does little to demonstrate the deleterious effects of chloride-rich resuscitative strategies. In a recent publication in Intensive Care Medicine, Yonus et al re-examine this question in the hopes of once again demonstrating the benefits of balanced fluid strategies for the resuscitation of the critically ill (10).  
emnerd.com
almost 7 years ago
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John Brownstein's Putting the Public Back in Public Health

Despite suffering from a cold that affected his voice, John Brownstein, Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School and on faculty at Boston Children's Hos...  
youtube.com
over 6 years ago
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John Brownstein's Putting the Public Back in Public Health - YouTube

Despite suffering from a cold that affected his voice, John Brownstein, Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School and on faculty at Boston Children's Hos...  
youtube.com
over 6 years ago
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Surgical treatment compared to non-surgical treatment (braces, exercise, or observation) for teens with idiopathic scoliosis | Cochrane

Scoliosis is a condition where the spine is curved in three dimensions (from the back the spine appears to be shaped like a 'c' or an 's'). It is often idiopathic, or of unknown cause. The most common type of scoliosis, adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), is discovered around 10 years of age or older, and is defined as a curve that measures at least 10 degrees (known as a Cobb angle, which is measured on an x-ray).  
cochrane.org
over 6 years ago
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“America’s Doctor” Dr Oz fights back against critics

Mehmet Oz, the popular television doctor known as Dr Oz and who has been dubbed “America’s Doctor” by the television personality Oprah Winfrey, has said that he will not be silenced by critics who have alleged that he misleads the public, promoting miracle cures of no proven value.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 6 years ago
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Seth and I from back in the day – Come join us at “SMACC” !

In memory of Dr John Hinds  
prehospitalmed.com
over 6 years ago
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Small Joint Arthrocentesis Video

Tapping a small joint isn't too hard with a little help from our friends. Dr. John Sarwark from Procedures Club discusses proper technique in this awesome video with background music that will bring us back to the 1970s.   
emcurious.com
over 6 years ago
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remember-to-check-the-back

Filed under: cardiology by hansen 1 Comment »  
sinaiem.org
over 6 years ago
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Art of Medicine: Bringing angry parents back from the brink

Suppose that you are an attending, fellow or senior resident precepting in the ED and your shift has been going well. You supervised a first-time LP—only 2 RBCs (Chardonnay tap?)—and helped with a patellar reduction. With your fellow mojo at an all-time high the last thing you want is a “social disaster.” Unfortunately, a resident comes out of the exam room and says that the mom wants to speak with his supervisor. When you ask why, the trainee says, “I don’t know…” and shrugs. There are strategies that can help a fellow serve as a facilitator and problem-solver and not just middle management.  
pemcincinnati.com
over 6 years ago
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airell hodgkinson hip fracture transfer anaesthesia

Gday and welcome back to the podcast after a short hiatus as I checked out the fish in Fiji...  Ahhh. Today's podcast is a conversation I had with my forme  
broomedocs.com
over 6 years ago
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Book Review: Expanding How We Think

By Rob Cooney  Six Thinking Hats - Edward DeBono Have you ever stepped back and thought about how you think?  Not all thinking is the same.  Unfortunately, western thinking is dominated by argument as perfected by the ancient Greek philosophers. This type of thinking still works, but in our ever-evolving world it isn't enough.  In his…  
icenetblog.royalcollege.ca
over 6 years ago
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Vitrectomy for idiopathic macular hole | Cochrane

Background A macular hole is an opening in the retina (the layer at the back of the eye that is sensitive to light) that develops at the fovea (the part of the eye that is responsible for sharp vision) and causes a small dark spot in the central vision, often preventing those with the condition from recognising very small objects, and particularly from reading ordinary print. Macular holes can be seen in people with highly myopic eyes (who cannot see clearly in the distance) or following ocular trauma, but in the great majority of cases the cause is unknown (idiopathic).  
cochrane.org
over 6 years ago
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THE MOST SPECTACULAR HELICOPTER RESCUE

A quick non-medical post, but it involves helicopters! There are loads of good Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) around. One of the most famous is Rega, a Swiss based HEMS. And they did a spectacular job back in the 80s. As many of the spectacular things done by helicopter services back then, it was also dangerous, and would never have been done today.  
scancrit.com
over 6 years ago