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Foo20151013 2023 s45v8o?1444774247
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Money-back guarantees

Ironically, it seems the health products with the least evidence are coming with the greatest assurances. A few years ago, a package holiday company advertised guaranteed sunny holidays in Queensland (Australia). The deal went something like this: if it rained on a certain percentage of your holiday days, you received a trip refund. An attractive drawcard indeed, but what the company failed to grasp was that the “Sunshine State” is very often anything but sunny. This is especially so where I live, on the somewhat ironically named Sunshine Coast. We had 200 rainy days last year and well over 2 metres of rain, and that was before big floods in January. Unsurprisingly, the guaranteed sunny holiday offer was short-lived. There are some things that really shouldn’t come with guarantees. The weather is one, health is another. Or so I thought… “Those capsules you started me on last month for my nerve pain didn’t work. I tried them for a couple of weeks, but they didn’t do nothin'.” “Perhaps you’d do better on a higher dose.” “Nah, they made me feel kinda dizzy. I’d prefer to get my money back on these ones an’ try somethin’ different.” “I can try you on something else, but there are no refunds available on the ones you’ve already used, I’m afraid.” “But they cost me over 80 dollars!” “Yes, I explained at the time that they are not subsidised by the government.” “But they didn’t work! If I bought a toaster that didn’t work, I’d take it back and get me money back, no problem.” “Medications are not appliances. They don’t work every time, but that doesn’t mean they’re faulty.” “But what about natural products? I order herbs for me prostate and me heart every month and they come with a 100% satisfaction guarantee. You doctors say those things don’t really work so how come the sellers are willing to put their money where their mouths are?” He decided to try a “natural” treatment next, confident of its likely effectiveness thanks to the satisfaction guarantee offered. Last week I had a 38-year-old female requesting a medical certificate stating that her back pain was no better. The reason? She planned to take it to her physiotherapist and request a refund because the treatment hadn’t helped. Like the afflicted patient above, she didn’t accept that health-related products and services weren’t “cure guaranteed”. “My thigh sculptor machine promised visible results in 60 days or my money back. Why aren’t physios held accountable too?” Upon a quick Google search, I found that many “natural health” companies offer money-back guarantees, as do companies peddling skin products and gimmicky home exercise equipment. I even found a site offering guaranteed homeopathic immunisation. Hmmm… In an information-rich, high-tech world, we are becoming less and less tolerant of uncertainty. Society wants perfect, predictable results — now! For all its advances, modern medicine cannot provide this and we don’t pretend otherwise. Ironically, it seems the health products with the least evidence are coming with the greatest assurances. A clever marketing ploy that patients seem to be buying into — literally and figuratively. I think we all need to be reminded of Benjamin Franklin’s famous words: “In this world, nothing can be said to be certain except death and taxes.” We can’t really put guarantees on whether it will rain down on our holidays or on our health, and should retain a healthy scepticism towards those who attempt to do so. This blog post has been adapted from a column first published in Australian Doctor http://www.australiandoctor.com.au/articles/11/0c070a11.asp Dr Genevieve Yates is an Australian GP, medical educator, medico-legal presenter and writer. You can read more of her work at http://genevieveyates.com/  
Dr Genevieve Yates
over 7 years ago
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Clinical Exam Still Matters

After I retired from my academic position at the University of Miami, I started working as an intermittent ob & gyn in various cultural settings in the US and abroad. In 2006 I practiced in a hospital in New Zealand. I saw many interesting cases during my six months at Whangarei Hospital. One stands out in particular. This was a middle aged native Mauri woman who had been seeing her family doctor for several years because she was gaining too much weight, her abdomen was getting bigger, and she was constipated. Each time the family doctor saw her, he did not examine her but patted her on the back and encouraged her to eat less, eat more fruit and vegetables and be more active so that she would lose weight. When much later he finally examined her, he noticed a large tumor in her abdomen and referred her to the hospital. To make a long story short, we operated on her and removed a large ovarian cyst weighing more than 18 kilograms (about 40 pounds). This cyst fortunately turned out to be benign and the woman did well. The operation itself was something else as we needed an extra assistant to hold the tumor in her arms while we removed it without breaking it. Even though this large tumor was certainly not a record, we ended up publishing the case in a New Zealaned medical journal for family practice (see reference below), not so much for the nature of the tumor itself as for pointing out to family doctors (all doctors, in fact) that examining patients before giving them advice is most important. Alison Gale, Tommy Cobb, Robert Norelli, William LeMaire. Increasing Abdominal Girth. The Importance of Clinical Examination. New Zealand Family Physician. 2006; 33 (4): 250-252  
DR William LeMaire
about 7 years ago
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RedGage: Best In Back-Linking or Finding New Referrals! - Latest Article, News and Top Stories

Me as well as every one of the individuals who have experienced this "Redgage", says one and only thing-"It is a fun web composing webpage with challenges and a…  
googlear.hatenablog.com
about 6 years ago
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Unable To Connect Xbox 360 To BT Home Hub 4 Wireless – Resolved

BT home hub 4 wireless connection issue on the Xbox 360 Please note: to connect your device wirelessly at first you need to know your hub’s wireless network name and wireless key. If you don’t know the wireless key or password, check under the side or at back of your BT hub as it will be mentioned there.  
fixithere.net
about 6 years ago
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Reality cheque

Angus Deaton wins the Nobel prize for bringing economics back to the real world  
economist.com
almost 6 years ago
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Back • AnatomyZone

3D video anatomy tutorials to help you revise the musculoskeletal structures of the back.  
anatomyzone.com
almost 6 years ago
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Aaron T. Beck, M.D.

A native of Providence, RI, Aaron T. Beck had an interest in the vagaries of human nature as far back as he can remember. After graduating magna cum laude from Brown University in 1942, he embarked on a career in medicine at Yale Medical School, graduating in 1946. He served a rotating internship, followed by…  
aaronbeckcenter.org
over 5 years ago
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Doctors Unionize to Resist the Medical Machine

An Oregon medical center’s plan to increase efficiency by outsourcing doctors drove a group of its hospitalists to fight back by banding together.  
nytimes.com
over 5 years ago
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Exercises for a Healthy Back

Most people will have back pain at some time in their lives. These exercises will show how to stretch out some of the common pain causing muscles.  
youtube.com
over 5 years ago
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Subarachnoid Haemorrhage - SAH

This is bleeding into the subarachnoid space. The classical sign is a sudden onset intense headache (“feel like I’ve been hit on the back of the head Doc”).   The bleeding occurs as the result of rupture of aneurysm (80%) and AV malformations (15%). In the remainder of cases, no cause can be identified. Trauma is also a major cause, but is not considered true SAH.    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 7 years ago
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We're Back! Transparent Electronics - The Naked Scientists

Naked Scientists - 24th Jan 2013 - We're Back! Transparent Electronics  
thenakedscientists.com
over 7 years ago
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Pushing Back the Pain Barrier - The Naked Scientists

Naked Scientists - 25th Jun 2011 - Pushing Back the Pain Barrier  
thenakedscientists.com
over 7 years ago
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Back in the Saddle: Getting Paralysed Patients Riding and Rowing - The Naked Scientists

Naked Scientists - 26th Dec 2010 - Back in the Saddle: Getting Paralysed Patients Riding and Rowing  
thenakedscientists.com
over 7 years ago
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Government is accused of back-pedalling on its commitment to “parity of esteem” between mental and physical healthcare

Sue Bailey, president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, speaking at a conference in London on Tuesday 29 April organised by the Westminster Health Forum, denounced new changes to tariffs that differentially affect mental and physical health services.  
www.bmj.com
over 7 years ago
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Jamie Oliver backs free school meals - BBC News

Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver has said he is behind the government's plans to give all pupils under seven in England free school meals.  
BBC News
over 7 years ago
Www.bmj
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In brief

Only two in five people return bowel screening test kits regularly: A study of over 60 000 people in southern England aged 60-64 years found that 70% sent back at least one bowel screening test kit over six years but that only 44% sent back all three tests.1 It also found that people from more deprived backgrounds were less likely to take part in bowel cancer screening than those from affluent backgrounds. Tests need to be done every two years to maximise the chance of detecting cancer.  
bmj.com
over 7 years ago
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Medical revalidation

Our qualitative assessment of the impact to date of medical revalidation on the behaviour of doctors and the culture of organisations within seven case study sites across England. Medical revalidation of doctors became a statutory obligation for all employing organisations in 2012, but its origins stretch back to 2000. In that period, the NHS has undergone many changes and been scrutinised by several reviews. It was against this shifting context that The King's Fund carried out a qualitative assessment of the impact to date of medical revalidation on the behaviour of doctors and the culture of organisations within seven case study sites across England.  
kingsfund.org.uk
over 7 years ago