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ChronicDisease

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Www.bmj
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12

Chronic disease causes more visits to emergency departments while visits for injuries fall, US study finds

The mix of patients seeking care in emergency departments in California has shifted, a new study shows, as the proportion of visits by patients needing care for injuries fell slightly while the proportion seeking care for non-injury diagnoses rose significantly.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
0
39

Guidelines, polypharmacy, and drug-drug interactions in patients with multimorbidity

Polypharmacy, defined as the chronic co-prescription of several drugs, is often the consequence of the application of disease specific guidelines, targeting disease specific goals, to patients with multiple chronic diseases. One common consequence of polypharmacy is the high rate of adverse drug reactions, mainly from drug-drug interactions (the ability of a drug to modify the action or effect of another drug administered successively or simultaneously).1 The risk of a drug-drug interaction in any particular patient increases with the number of co-existing diseases and the number of drugs prescribed.2  
feeds.bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
0
29

Chronic disease causes more visits to emergency departments while visits for injuries fall, US study finds

The mix of patients seeking care in emergency departments in California has shifted, a new study shows, as the proportion of visits by patients needing care for injuries fell slightly while the proportion seeking care for non-injury diagnoses rose significantly.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
0
14

Collaboration is needed to promote the good medicine of exercise

MacAuley and colleagues rightly state that it’s “extraordinary how long mainstream medicine is taking to accept the importance of physical activity.”1 If we are serious about providing the best care for every patient every time, something that is proved to increase happiness, prevent and treat more than 40 chronic diseases, and significantly increase life expectancy should be a key weapon.2  
feeds.bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Preview
1
32

Chronic Illness

The Newest Edition Of Best-Selling Chronic Illness Continues To Focus On The Various Aspects Of Chronic Illness That Influence Both Patients And Their Families. Topics Include The Sociological, Psychological, Ethical, Organizational, And Financial Factors, As Well As Individual And System Outcomes. This Book Is Designed To Teach Students About The Whole Client Or Patient Versus The Physical Status Of The Client With Chronic Illness. The Study Questions At The End Of Each Chapter And The Case Studies Help The Students Apply The Information To Real Life. Evidence-Based Practice References Are Included In Almost Every Chapter.  
books.google.co.uk
almost 7 years ago
Www.bmj
2
73

Guidelines, polypharmacy, and drug-drug interactions in patients with multimorbidity

Polypharmacy, defined as the chronic co-prescription of several drugs, is often the consequence of the application of disease specific guidelines, targeting disease specific goals, to patients with multiple chronic diseases. One common consequence of polypharmacy is the high rate of adverse drug reactions, mainly from drug-drug interactions (the ability of a drug to modify the action or effect of another drug administered successively or simultaneously).1 The risk of a drug-drug interaction in any particular patient increases with the number of co-existing diseases and the number of drugs prescribed.2  
bmj.com
almost 7 years ago
Www.bmj
1
23

Guidelines, polypharmacy, and drug-drug interactions in patients with multimorbidity

Polypharmacy, defined as the chronic co-prescription of several drugs, is often the consequence of the application of disease specific guidelines, targeting disease specific goals, to patients with multiple chronic diseases. One common consequence of polypharmacy is the high rate of adverse drug reactions, mainly from drug-drug interactions (the ability of a drug to modify the action or effect of another drug administered successively or simultaneously).1 The risk of a drug-drug interaction in any particular patient increases with the number of co-existing diseases and the number of drugs prescribed.2  
bmj.com
almost 7 years ago
Www.bmj
1
30

Should vitamin D supplements be recommended to prevent chronic diseases? | The BMJ

Do not recommend vitamin D supplements to prevent chronic disease because clear evidence of benefit does not currently exist and adverse effects cannot be excluded - currently located behind a paywall. Your institution may have access through Athens/Elservier or similar.  
bmj.com
almost 7 years ago
Www.bmj
1
32

Guidelines, polypharmacy, and drug-drug interactions in patients with multimorbidity

Polypharmacy, defined as the chronic co-prescription of several drugs, is often the consequence of the application of disease specific guidelines, targeting disease specific goals, to patients with multiple chronic diseases. One common consequence of polypharmacy is the high rate of adverse drug reactions, mainly from drug-drug interactions (the ability of a drug to modify the action or effect of another drug administered successively or simultaneously).1 The risk of a drug-drug interaction in any particular patient increases with the number of co-existing diseases and the number of drugs prescribed.2  
bmj.com
almost 7 years ago
Preview
1
51

Journal club: Chronic disease management for tobacco dependence

Stream Journal club: Chronic disease management for tobacco dependence by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
almost 7 years ago
Www.bmj
1
27

Revolutionising management of chronic disease: the ParkinsonNet approach

Patients with Parkinson’s disease need long term support to manage their condition. Bastiaan Bloem and Marten Munneke describe the benefits of a model of integrated care provided by a network of specialists and suggest it has promise for other long term conditions  
bmj.com
over 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 o7es6t?1444774265
16
453

Chronic: How one word can change everything

So, I think its about time I posted another blog post! A few weeks ago I received the results from my most recent scan. I was both nervous and excited to find out my results, after months of tests and being misdiagnosed several times I just wanted to know what was wrong with me. However, as I read through the letter from my consultant I realised that my journey was just beginning. I was diagnosed with a rare stomach condition. Gastroparesis. A chronic illness. There is no known cure, just various treatments with limited success. I didn’t really know how to react to this news. Shouldn’t I be happy that I finally knew what was wrong? I had convinced myself for months that as soon as the doctors found out what was wrong, they could fix it and I’d be better in no time, but this wasn’t to be. I couldn’t understand how this could happen. Slowly the reality began to sink in, I’ll probably be fighting this battle for the rest of my life. I think the mental aspect of chronic conditions is so commonly overlooked. I’ve sat through endless lectures about the pathophysiology of illnesses but I’ve never once stopped to think what it must be like to actually have it. The way it can limit your life, from not being able to go for a drink with friends because you’re in too much pain to the countless hospital appointments that your life seems to revolve around. The thing that hit me the most is the amount of medications I have to take on a daily basis just to make my symptoms bearable. I no longer have full control of my life and that's the worst part. This experience has given me an invaluable insight into how patients with chronic illness feel. It affects almost every aspect of your life and you can never escape. It scares me to think of the future, I never know when I’m going to get my next flare up or how long its going to last. I just have to take one day at a time and hope that when I wake up tomorrow I won’t be too nauseous. After spending a few weeks feeling down about it all, I’ve realised that I just have to enjoy life when I can and be grateful that I can still live a normal-ish life. It doesn’t matter how much I complain, it's not going to go away, and I think I’ve finally accepted that fact. If anything, this experience has made me more determined to achieve my dream of becoming a doctor. I’ve been a lot more motivated to work harder so that one day I can help others like me through some of their toughest times, hopefully bringing them some comfort and relief.  
Nicole Mooney
almost 8 years ago
Preview
0
41

Chronic Illness & Palliative Care, Part 2

There are misperceptions about living with a chronic illness such as diabetes. Hear about some of the recent and future advancements in diabetes care helping patients live full and meaningful lives. See what happens when the chronic illness reaches its life-limiting stages. Hear how patients, families, and physicians can integrate palliative care into their treatment to support living the best life possible during this challenging time. Carlos Pellegrini, M.D., Henry N. Harkins Professor and Chair of the UW Department of Surgery Stuart Farber, associate professor, department of Family Medicine, Hospice Medical Director, University of Washington Edward Walker, M.D. Medical Director, UW Medical Center and Associate Dean, UW School of Medicine Irl Hirsch, MD, professor, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Washington 03/10/2004  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 8 years ago