New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

Preview
1
41

ECG Revision Lecture

Year 5 Revision Lecture by Dr. Rick Body Consultant in Emergency Medicine  
YouTube
over 7 years ago
Preview
1
33

Visual Fields in 5 min

Fiona Carley - Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon on Visual Fields. Please note that this short eLecture is on testing visual fields as part of an ophthalmology e...  
YouTube
over 7 years ago
Preview
1
65

Fundoscopy in 5 min

Mrs Fiona Carley, Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon at the Manchester Royal Eye Hospital delivering a beginners guide to performing fundoscopy  
YouTube
over 7 years ago
Preview
1
24

Pediatric Cardiology-Pregnancy in patients with heart disease

Pediatric Cardiology Teaching,lectures conducted by Dr Sangeetha Viswanathan- Consultant Interventional Pediatric Cardiologist MRCPCH(UK), CCST Pediatric Car...  
YouTube
over 7 years ago
Specialists in out of hospital settings front cover
1
27

Specialists in out-of-hospital settings

We visited six services where consultants are delivering or facilitating care outside hospital. This report presents the findings from those visits as case studies and identifies some of the key characteristics and challenges to this way of working.Demographic changes, technological advances and the changing pattern of disease are pushing up the numbers of patients with complex needs who require treatment in the community. But outside hospital, the resources and expertise are often not available to treat them, and patient care can be disjointed as different parts of the system fail to understand each other. In response, consultants in some areas of England are developing services that link secondary, primary, community and social care professionals.  
The King's Fund
about 7 years ago
Preview
1
26

New Welsh emergency service fleet unveiled - BBC News

A new fleet of emergency service team is unveiled which will include a fleet of 4x4s and consultants flying with the Wales Air Ambulance.  
BBC News
almost 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 thqdyy?1444774274
1
195

Why we need to work to maintain a social life - A Darwinian Medical Training Programme

Book of the week (BotW) = The Darwin Economy by Prof Frank Being a medical student and wanna-be-surgeon, I am naturally very competitive. I know exactly where I want to end up in life. I want to be a surgeon at a major unit doing research, teaching and management, as well as many other things. To reach this goal in a rational way I, and many others like me, need to look at what is required and make sure that we tick the boxes. We must also out-compete every other budding surgeon with a similar interest. Medicine is also a dog-eat-dog world when it comes to getting the job you want. Luckily you can head off into almost any field you find interesting, as long as you have the points on your CV to get access to the training. In recent years, the number of med students has increased, but so has the competition for places. The number of FY1 jobs has increased but so has the competition for good rotations. The number of consultant posts has increased, but so has the competition for the jobs. To even be considered for an interview for a consultant surgeon post these days a candidate (hopefully my future self) will have to demonstrate an excellent knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathology and demography. They will need to have competent surgical skills and have completed all of the hours and numbers of procedures. To further demonstrate this they will need to have gone on extra-curricular courses and fellowships. They will also need to show that they can teach and have been doing so regularly. They must now also have an understanding of medical leadership and have a portfolio of projects. Finally, they will have had to tick the research box, with posters, publications, oral presentations and research degrees. That’s a long list of tick boxes and guess what? It has been getting longer! I regularly attend a surgical research collaborative meeting in Birmingham. Many of those surgeons didn’t even get taught about research at medical school or publish anything until they were registrars. Now even to get onto a good Core Training post you need to have at the very least some posters in your chosen field and probably a minimum of a publication. That’s a pretty big jump in standards in just 15 years. In two generations the competition has increased exponentially. Why is that? Prof Frank explains economic competition in Darwinian terms. His insights apply equally well to the medical training programme. It’s all about your relative performance compared to your peers and the continual arms race for the best resources (training posts). However, the catch is, if everyone ups their performance by the same amount then you all work harder for no more advantage for anyone, except for the first few people who made the upgrade. The majority do not benefit but are in fact harmed by this continual arms race. I believe that this competition will only get worse as each new year of med students tries to keep up and surpass the previous cohort. This competition will inevitably lead to a greater time commitment from the students with no potential gain. Everything we do is relative to everyone else. If we up our game, we will outperform the competition, until they catch up with us and then relatively we are no better off but are working harder. Why is this relevant? I know everyone will want to select “the best” candidate, but in medicine the “best” candidate doesn’t really exist because we are all almost equally capable of doing the role, once we have had the training. So there is no point us all working ourselves into the ground for a future job, if all our hard work won’t pay off for most of us anyway. But we can’t make these choices as individuals because if one of us says that “I am not going to play the game. I am going to enjoy my free time with my friends and family”, that person won’t get the competitive job because everyone else will out-perform them. We have to tackle this issue as a cohort. How do we ensure that we don’t work ourselves into the ground for nothing? Collectively as medical students and trainees we should ask the BMA and Royal Collages to set out a strict application process that means once candidates have met the minimum requirements, there is no more points for additional effort. For instance, the application form for a surgical consultant post should only have space to include 5 peer-reviewed publications. That way it wouldn’t necessarily matter if you had 5 or 50 publications. This limit may seem counter-intuitive and will possibly work against the highly competitive high achievers, but it will have a positive effect on everyone else’s life. Imagine if you only had to write 5 papers in your career to guarantee a chance at a job, instead of having to write 25. All that extra time you would have had to invest in extra-curricular research can now be used more productively by you to achieve other life goals, like more time with your family or more patient contact or even more time in theatre perfecting your skills. If you were selecting candidates for senior clinicians, would you rather pick an all round doctor who has met all of the requirements and has a balanced work-life balance or a neurotic competitor who hasn’t slept in 8 years and is close to a breakdown? Being a doctor is more than a profession, it is a life-style choice but we should try to prevent it becoming our entire lives.  
jacob matthews
over 7 years ago
Preview
1
9

Education for Cardiology Disease Professionals - Radcliffecardiology

Cardiology consultants can find the latest news & information about cardiovascular disease & cardiology conferences by going to Radcliffe cardiology’s website.  
radcliffecardiology.com
almost 7 years ago
Preview
1
54

Liver Pathology

This unique book provides detailed insight into a wealth of expert experience in liver pathology, with an in-depth review of the expertÌs analysis and diagnostic process supported by high-quality color photomicrographs and discussion of the diagnostic principles involved in evaluating these lesions. The diagnostic problems and cases selected show the wide range of specimens seen in liver pathology and address the difficult issues in diagnosis encountered in these lesions. Chapters and cases are authored by many of the leading experts and educators in liver pathology today. Liver Pathology will be essential reading for every pathologist who evaluates liver pathology specimens. In addition it will be a valuable resource for pathology residents and fellows. All Consultant Pathology Titles Provide: Actual consultation cases and expert analysis Expert analysis provides a detailed discussion of the reasoning behind the diagnosis of each case Comprehensive coverage of challenging diagnoses The cases are richly illustrated with high-quality photomicrographs  
books.google.co.uk
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
13

Orthopaedic surgeon who botched four operations while working as a locum is struck off

A surgeon whose attempt to repair a fractured ankle was called “a spectacular failure” by one consultant and “a frightening example of orthopaedic surgery” by another has been struck off the UK medical register.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Preview
1
52

Paediatric Respiratory Medicine

Paediatric Respiratory Medicine, second edition remains the first point of reference for those faced with treating acute or chronic respiratory problems. The handbook discusses the approach to clinical problems, specific conditions, supportive care and practical procedures, and includes vital appendices covering specific tests and statistics. Designed as a practical guide, it serves general and specialist paediatricians at both consultant and trainee level. The book is divided into five parts. Part I provides a practical approach to acute and non-acute clinical problems. Part II provides detailed information about common and more rare clinical conditions. Part III provides useful information on supportive care, including for example, use of non-invasive ventilation and the care of a child with a tracheotomy. Part IV gives details on how to perform several practical procedures, such as ciliary brush biopsy, flexible bronchoscopy, and inserting a chest drain. The appendices provide information on lung function testing and tables of age-corrected normal values for several respiratory parameters. Written by three consultants in paediatric respiratory medicine, their expertise in the subject provides all levels of paediatricians with practical guide on a subject that is increasingly relevant in paediatrics.  
books.google.co.uk
over 6 years ago
Preview
1
44

Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynaecology for Clinical Officers and Midwives

The author of this book has a vast experience of teaching Medical and Midwifery students both in Tanzania and abroad. He has also worked as a Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist in public hospitals both in Tanzania and abroad. This book is a testimony of the vast experience of the author. This book describes the management of a woman during pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum as well as care of the newborn. The book gives useful guidelines in the management of normal as well as 'High risk' women during this critical period of their lives. The book has been written in a style which makes it easy to read and understand. It is a book that medical/midwifery students and the practitioners working in health centres will find useful.  
books.google.co.uk
over 6 years ago