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Contraception

Category

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12
203

Introduction to contraception.

Introduction to ¥ Contraceptive Methods: An Overview on receptive Technology ate Series  
Hira Zahid
over 9 years ago
13
3
31

Fixing Birth Control Pill Problems

Topics This afternoon, I’d like to talk about how birth control pills work, so you can understand how to resolve problems when they’re not working correctly. Free Links: OBGYN-10 OBGYN-101 Gray Haired Note Brookside Associates Medical Education Division  
Mike Hughey, MD
about 10 years ago
Preview
3
33

Emergency Contraception

Emergency contraception These below methods do not cause abortion. Instead, they prevent ovulation, fertilisation, and/or implantation. Those who believe life begins at fertilisation may argue that abortion can occur with these methods, and may have objections. However, the method does not cause any alteration to an embryo after implantation.    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 6 years ago
Preview
2
27

Religion and Contraception

When discussing contraception with a patient, in may be useful to understand a little about the patient’s religious background.   Obviously, it is not the medical professional’s position to advise on any religious aspects, but only to advise on the medical basis of contraceptive methods, and their use and efficacy, thus that the patient may make their own informed decision. It can be a difficult decision for patients, when their Religious beliefs and personal views on contraception are at odds.    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 6 years ago
Preview
2
90

Bedside Obstetrics & Gynecology

The second edition of Bedside Obstetrics & Gynecology brings postgraduate trainees fully up to date with the most recent advances in the field. The first section covers obstetrics, discussing normal and abnormal presentations (such as normal labour versus breech presentation), complications in pregnancy (including early pregnancy bleeding and ante- and postpartum haemorrhage), and medical disorders related to pregnancy (such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes). Section two covers numerous gynaecological abnormalities. This new edition has been fully revised but continues to emphasise the importance of history taking and clinical examination. New chapters have been added to cover topics such as preterm pregnancy, post-dated pregnancy and intrauterine death, bleeding due to miscarriage, menopause and contraception. Nearly 1100 images, illustrations and tables enhance learning, and each chapter includes questions and answers related to case studies. Key points Fully revised, new edition providing recent advances in obstetrics and gynaecology Many new chapters added Includes 1100 images, illustrations and tables Previous edition published in 2010  
books.google.co.uk
over 5 years ago
Preview
2
111

Core Clinical Cases in Obstetrics and Gynaecology Third Edition

You've read your textbook and your course notes. Now you need to apply your knowledge to real life clinical situations. The problem-solving approach of Core Clinical Cases guides you to think of the patient as a whole, rather than as a sequence of unconnected symptoms. With its emphasis on everyday practice strongly linked to underlying theory, the series integrates your knowledge with the realities of managing clinical problems, and provides a basis for developing sound analytical and confident decision-making skills. The core areas of undergraduate study are covered in a logical sequence of learning activities; the same questions are asked of each clinical case, followed by detailed explanatory answers. OSCE counselling cases, with related questions and answers, also feature in each section. Key concepts and important information are highlighted, and the reader-friendly layout reflects exactly the type of question you will encounter, making these volumes the perfect revision aid for all types of case-based examination. The Obstetrics and Gynaecology volume, fully revised and updated in this third edition, focuses on the following topics: * Early pregnancy problems * Pregnancy dating and fetal growth * Late pregnancy problems * Labour * Medical disorders of pregnancy * Puerperium * Abnormal uterine bleeding * Amenorrhoea and menopause * Incontinence and prolapse * Neoplasia * Discharge and pain* Infertility * Fertility control Volumes in the Core Clinical Cases series remain absolutely invaluable in the run up to clinical, written or OSCE examinations, and ideal course companions for all undergraduate medical students at various stages in their clinical training.  
books.google.co.uk
over 5 years ago
Preview
2
77

Core Clinical Cases in Obstetrics and Gynaecology Third Edition

You've read your textbook and your course notes. Now you need to apply your knowledge to real life clinical situations. The problem-solving approach of Core Clinical Cases guides you to think of the patient as a whole, rather than as a sequence of unconnected symptoms. With its emphasis on everyday practice strongly linked to underlying theory, the series integrates your knowledge with the realities of managing clinical problems, and provides a basis for developing sound analytical and confident decision-making skills. The core areas of undergraduate study are covered in a logical sequence of learning activities; the same questions are asked of each clinical case, followed by detailed explanatory answers. OSCE counselling cases, with related questions and answers, also feature in each section. Key concepts and important information are highlighted, and the reader-friendly layout reflects exactly the type of question you will encounter, making these volumes the perfect revision aid for all types of case-based examination. The Obstetrics and Gynaecology volume, fully revised and updated in this third edition, focuses on the following topics: * Early pregnancy problems * Pregnancy dating and fetal growth * Late pregnancy problems * Labour * Medical disorders of pregnancy * Puerperium * Abnormal uterine bleeding * Amenorrhoea and menopause * Incontinence and prolapse * Neoplasia * Discharge and pain* Infertility * Fertility control Volumes in the Core Clinical Cases series remain absolutely invaluable in the run up to clinical, written or OSCE examinations, and ideal course companions for all undergraduate medical students at various stages in their clinical training.  
books.google.co.uk
over 5 years ago
Preview
2
88

Postgraduate Gynecology

Comprehensive coverage on gynecologic disorders most importantly menstrual abnormalities, infertility, contraception, urinary problems, cancer, endoscopy and ultrasound in gynecology. A unique feature of this book is the work-out of real-time clinical scenarios, giving explanations as to how to arrive at a rational clinical diagnosis and management. This helps the students understand the topic in a better way, equipping them to manage the patients themselves. This book explain on the techniques, tips and interpretations of ultrasonography and detailed in a separate chapter. The obstetrician-gynecologist should acquire the knowledge and skills in the field of ultrasonography so much so that it evolves as an essential armamentarium for diagnosis and management by themselves. Chapters are introduced with a non-formal statement that sets the tone for developing the core idea. They are then structured into subtopics and are further divided into small and discrete sections to which the reader’s attention is sought. Colored illustrations and flow charts for easy understanding of the subject. Concise, high-yield subject matter in boxes. Analysis of real clinical scenarios.  
books.google.co.uk
almost 5 years ago
1
1
76

What Does a Uterus Do All Day Long?

Topics Today, I’ll discuss the inherent contraction patterns of the uterus as they vary throughout the menstrual cycle and the role that may play in sperm transport, infertility, endometriosis and contraception. Free Links: OBGYN-10 OBGYN-101 Gray Haired Note Brookside Associates Medical Education Division  
Mike Hughey, MD
about 10 years ago
Preview
1
13

JFPRHC podcast: A transatlantic view of oral contraception

Stream JFPRHC podcast: A transatlantic view of oral contraception by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 6 years ago
Preview
1
12

JFPRHC podcast: A transatlantic view of oral contraception

Stream JFPRHC podcast: A transatlantic view of oral contraception by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 6 years ago
10
1
1

contraception-emergency

This CKS topic is based mainly on guidance produced by the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare (FSRH), formerly the Faculty of Family Planning and Reproductive Healthcare (FFPRHC) [FSRH, 2011c] and covers the management of women requesting emergency contraception in primary care.  
cks.nice.org.uk
over 5 years ago
2
1
18

FAMILY PLANNING. A DILEMMA FOR THE CATHOLIC PRACTITIONER.

While in school, training, or practice, medical doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants or any health care worker for that matter, will be dealing with issues of family planning almost on a daily basis. They may also encounter these issues in their personal lives. While most religions allow artificial methods of family planning, the Roman Catholic Church has been steadfast in opposing any form of such artificial methods. The only method allowed is the so called "fertility awareness" method. This is based on the premise that avoidance of sexual intercourse during the fertile time of a woman's menstrual cycle will avoid pregnancy. Medical advances have certainly made the fertility awareness method more accurate, but determining this fertile time of the cycle still requires some effort and dedication by the woman and her partner. Nevertheless these natural methods work well and with a great deal of effectiveness when applied by such dedicated and educated couples and when the woman has relatively regular menstrual cycles. However, in less than these ideal circumstances, like in developing countries or refugee camps, where people often live in squalor and poverty, lack food and basic necessities, have no or little medical care, and where women do not have regular menstrual cycles, these natural methods have a high failure rate. A high failure rate results in unwanted pregnancies which add to the family's burden and are a factor in increasing even further their poverty status. Thus creating a vicious cycle. Under the conditions just described, families need highly effective contraceptives measures. On his return from a visit to the Philippines Pope Francis recently advocated catholics to limit the size of their families to a manageable number. This is great and welcome advice but in the same interview he reaffirmed the church's opposition to any artificial means of contraception. This seems rather unfair to me. On the one hand he tell catholics to limit their family size and on the other hand he denies them the effective methods of doing so. Ever since Francis became Pope he has indicated that he is willing to listen to the pressing needs facing, not only catholics but all people and possibly consider bringing the teaching of the Church into the twenty first century. There are certainly a number of indications that changes may be in the offing. First he has organized a Synod of the hierarchy of the Church in Rome last year to discuss all matters related to the family. When that Synod of "fizzled" out he has call for a follow up Synod later this year. He has made a number powerful statements and overtures towards homosexuals and divorced people and has strongly supported a strive for women's equality. He has even made some overtures to women who have had an abortion. Why not also open up the issue of contraception, so sorely needed in the world as I argued above? If the catholic church were to allow artificial methods of family planning, catholic medical practitioners and in fact all catholics, would no longer face the dilemma in their daily activities: adhere to the teaching of the church and deny their clients the effective means of limiting the size of their families and in doing so risk an unwanted pregnancy; or ignore the teaching and continue to use, prescribe, advice, insert, inject, operate to provide their clients with the effective contraception they want and need, but thereby feel marginalized by the church they love. There is already much evidence that a majority of catholics in the world follow this latter path. We can only hope that the Pope will listen to the experiences of couples from all walks of life and that he will solicit the input of catholic medical providers. May be, just may be, common sense and desperate needs will prevail, but do not hold your breath. Submitted by: William J. LeMaire MD Emeritus professor of Obstetric and Gynecology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Miami, Florida USA 33155  
DR William LeMaire
about 5 years ago
4
1
0

Long-acting reversible contraception | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

This guideline should not be updated at this time. For further information, please refer to the Surveillance Review Decision.  
nice.org.uk
about 5 years ago
Preview
1
1

Portal:Feminism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Feminism has altered predominant perspectives in a wide range of areas within Western society, ranging from culture to law. Feminist activists have campaigned for women's legal rights (rights of contract, property rights, voting rights); for rights to bodily integrity and autonomy, for abortion rights, and for reproductive rights (including access to contraception and quality prenatal care); for protection from domestic violence, sexual harassment and rape; for workplace rights, including maternity leave and equal pay; and against other forms of discrimination.  
en.wikipedia.org
almost 5 years ago
12
1
15

WHAT A PITTY! POPE FRANCIS’ REAFFIRMs IN “AMORIS LAETITIA” THE BAN On CONTRACEPTION BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.

On April 8th Vatican released the long awaited publication by Pope Francis “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This very lengthy and comprehensive document deals with the many issues facing the family. There are many beautiful passages in it about a large number of issues. Many catholics around the world will be pleased to read about the Pope’s (Church’s) much more open and progressive views of such issues as divorce and homosexuality amongst many other issues. But in fact nothing has changed. In this document the Pope reaffirms the position of the Roman Catholic Church regarding the use of artificial methods of contraception. This statement is certainly very disappointing to many catholics. Only natural methods of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods” are condoned by the Catholic Church. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. During his return last year from a visit to the Philippines, Pope Francis made the somewhat unexpected statement that catholic families would do well to limit their families to a manageable size. A most welcome recommendation indeed! However, during the same interview Pope Francis again reaffirmed the opposition by the Church to any form of artificial birth control. How then are the people living under less than ideal circumstances as I described above, supposed to adhere to the Pope’s recommendations to limit the seize of their family? The natural methods have a high failure rate under these conditions. It seems to me that the Pope (and the Catholic Church) can not have it both ways and place these people before a very unfair dilemma. Either adhere to the Church’s teaching and attempt to use the natural methods of family planning that are allowed, but in doing so risk an unwanted pregnancy, or ignore the teaching and use the many artificial methods available and in doing so be marginalized by the Church to which they belong. A very large number of professed catholics world-wide are choosing the latter option, and that includes me. Many of the catholic priests, with whom I have discussed this issue will tell me to ignore the Church’s teaching, follow my conscience, and continue with my practice of prescribing artificial methods of contraception and carrying out permanent sterilization procedures. (I am a gynecologist). That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing.  
DR William LeMaire
over 4 years ago
13
1
14

ARTIFICIAL CONTRACEPTION STILL BANNED BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.

WHAT A PITTY AND A MISSED OPPORTUNITY. POPE FRANCIS’ REAFFIRMS IN “AMORIS LAETITIA” THE BAN ON CONTRACEPTION BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH. On April 8th Vatican released the long awaited publication by Pope Francis “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This very lengthy and comprehensive document deals with the many issues facing the family. There are many beautiful passages in it about a large number of issues. Many catholics around the world will be pleased to read about the Pope’s (Church’s) much more open and progressive views of such issues as divorce and homosexuality amongst many other issues. But in fact nothing has changed. In this document the Pope reaffirms the position of the Roman Catholic Church regarding the use of artificial methods of contraception. This statement is certainly very disappointing to many catholics and to catholic medical care givers. Only natural methods of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods” are condoned by the Catholic Church. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. During his return last year from a visit to the Philippines, Pope Francis made the somewhat unexpected statement that catholic families would do well to limit their families to a manageable size. A most welcome recommendation indeed! However, during the same interview Pope Francis again reaffirmed the opposition by the Church to any form of artificial birth control. How then are the people living under less than ideal circumstances as I described above, supposed to adhere to the Pope’s recommendations to limit the seize of their family? The natural methods have a high failure rate under these conditions. It seems to me that the Pope (and the Catholic Church) can not have it both ways and place these people before a very unfair dilemma. Either adhere to the Church’s teaching and attempt to use the natural methods of family planning that are allowed, but in doing so risk an unwanted pregnancy, or ignore the teaching and use the many artificial methods available and in doing so be marginalized by the Church to which they belong. A very large number of professed catholics world-wide are choosing the latter option, and that includes me. Some of the catholic priests, with whom I have discussed this issue will tell me to ignore the Church’s teaching, follow my conscience, and continue with my practice of prescribing artificial methods of contraception and carrying out permanent sterilization procedures. (I am a gynecologist). That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing. William J. LeMaire MD Emeritus Professor Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine  
DR William LeMaire
over 4 years ago
1
1
11

SHOULD THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH REMOVE ITS BAN ON ARTIFICIAL METHODS OF FAMILY PLANNING?

This is a question faced by many catholic health care providers throughout the world. The Roman Catholic Church officially opposes any artificial method of family planning. When Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio became the new leader of the Roman Catholic Church (Church from here on) in February 2013 as Pope Francis, catholics all over the world were encouraged by the idea that they might see some changes in the teachings of the Church as it relates to many issues pertaining to the “family”. These issues include divorce, remarriage, homosexuality, family planning and a number of other topics. I want to focus in this discussion on the longstanding opposition by the Church to the use of artificial methods of family planning (contraception). This ban on contraception affects catholic medical practitioners on a daily basis and this includes, family doctors, RNs, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and any medical care giver involved with counseling clients about methods for planning their families and implementing the chosen methods. As we know, the Church allows only “natural methods” of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods”. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. The hope for a change in this official position of the Church has been fostered by the observation that Pope Francis seemed to be willing to listen and has made a number conciliatory remarks on issues like women’s equality, divorced and remarried couples and homosexuality, while continuing to accept only the natural methods of family planning. Then came the most recent publication by Pope Francis, “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This is a beautifully written document about issues related to the family, in which the Pope makes again conciliatory remarks about a number of issues, but reaffirms the position of the Church in regards to family planning. No artificial methods are condoned. This seems to close the door on this issue, at least for the foreseeable future. What a pity and what a missed opportunity for the Pope to bring the teachings of the Church as it pertains to contraception in line with the thinking and practice of the 21st century. It is well known, and adequate statistics are available to show that worldwide a large percentage of catholics are ignoring the teaching of the church as it pertains to family planning and availing themselves of contraception to plan their families. On a personal note I have spoken to a number of priests and asked them about my practice as a catholic obstetrician and gynecologist of prescribing and implementing artificial contraception for my catholic clients. Some of them have told me to following my conscience and continue what I am doing. That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing. In this regard the recent publication from the Wiingaards Institute for Catholic Research might be of interest: http://www.catholicsandcontraception.com William J. LeMaire MD Emeritus Professor Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Miami, Florida  
DR William LeMaire
over 4 years ago
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1
17

Reproductive health - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Within the framework of the World Health Organization's (WHO) definition of health as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, reproductive health, or sexual health/hygiene, addresses the reproductive processes, functions and system at all stages of life.[1] Reproductive health implies that people are able to have a responsible, satisfying and safer sex life and that they have the capability to reproduce and the freedom to decide if, when and how often to do so. One interpretation of this implies that men and women ought to be informed of and to have access to safe, effective, affordable and acceptable methods of birth control; also access to appropriate health care services of sexual, reproductive medicine and implementation of health education programs to stress the importance of women to go safely through pregnancy and childbirth could provide couples with the best chance of having a healthy infant.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 4 years ago
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0
14

Domestic violence deters contraception

Domestic violence takes many forms. The control of a woman's reproductive choices by her partner is one of them.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 5 years ago