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Www.bmj
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Irritable bowel syndrome in adults in primary care: summary of updated NICE guidance

Consider using the low FODMAP diet for patients whose irritable bowel syndrome symptoms persist despite following general lifestyle and dietary advice from a healthcare professional with relevant expertise  
bmj.com
almost 7 years ago
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Aseem Malhotra on the impact of diet on heart disease #Don’tFearTheFat

Stream Aseem Malhotra on the impact of diet on heart disease #Don’tFearTheFat by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
almost 7 years ago
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Is there a special diet for those with peptic ulcers?

Do you know of any special diet for a patient with peptic ulcer?  
Irene Kolosa
almost 8 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 xzilvf?1444774307
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Why doesn’t the NHS make money?

The NHS provides care free at the point of us to British citizens and anyone who needs emergency care while in the UK. It tries to provide every kind of service and treatment that it can but obviously there are limits. The NHS gets its money mainly from governments taxes, charities, research grants, some payment for services and from renting out retail space etc. Healthcare is a financial blackhole, any money put in the budget will get spent, efficiently and effectively or not. The NHS is constantly being expected to provide a better, more efficient service and new treatments, without a comparable increase in government funding. So, why doesn’t the NHS set up services that could make it money? Some money making suggestions Gift shops and NHS clothing brand – The American hospital I went to for elective had quite a large shop near the entrance that sold hospital branded goods. People love the NHS and it could make itself a brand, “I love the NHS” t-shirts, “I was born here” ties, “I gave birth at Blah hospital” car stickers, hats, jackets, tracksuits, teddy bears in white coats and so many more things could be sold in this shops to raise money for the NHS. Patients in a hospital are a captive market and their visitors are semi-captive. The captives get very bored! Why not provide opportunities for these people to spend their money and relieve the boredom while they are in hospital with some retail therapy? For instance, new hospitals should be built with a shopping mall in them and a cinema. A couple of clothes shops would give people something to do and raise money from rent. While we are on the subject of new hospitals, they should be designed with the input of the clinical staff who know how to maximise the flow of patients through the "patient pathway". Hospitals should be built like industrial conveyor belts: patients enter through ED, get stabilised, get fixed in theatre, stabilised again in ITU, recover on the wards and out the exit to social services and the outpatient clinics. New hospitals should be designed to sit on top of HUGE underground multi-story car parks. If shopping centres can do this then so can hospitals. Almost all hospitals are short of parking spaces and most car parks are eye sores. So, try to plan from the beginning to get as many car parking spaces as possible. Estimate how many are needed for staff and visitors - then double it! Also, design a park and ride system so additional parking is available off site. If costa can make money from a coffee shop in an NHS hospital, why isn’t the NHS setting up its own brand of high quality coffee shops in the hospitals and cutting out Costa the middle man? “NHS healthy eating” – NHS branded diet plans or ready meals could be produced in partnership with a supermarket brand. Mixing public heath, profit and the NHS brand. “Good for you and good for the NHS” The NHS could set up hospitals abroad that are for profit institutions that use the NHS structures, or market our services to foreigners that they then pay for. Health tourism is a thing, why not make the most of it? “NHS plus” – the NHS should be a two tier system. Hours of 8am til 6pm should be for elective procedures free at the point of use and free emergency care. Between 6pm and 11pm the hospitals currently only do emergency care, so there is loads of rooms and kit lying about unused. Why not allow hospitals to set up systems where patients can pay for an evening slot in the MRI scanner and cut the queue? Allow surgeons to pay to use the facilities for private procedures in the evenings. Allow physicians to pay to use the outpatients clinics for private work after hours. An “NHS Journal” could publish research and audits conducted within and relevant to the NHS. “NHS pharma” – the NHS buys a huge amount of off patent drugs, why not produce them itself? Set up a drug company that produces off patent medication, these can be given to the NHS at cost price and sold to other healthcare providers for profit. NHS pharma could also work with British universities and researchers to produce new drugs for the British market that would be cheaper than new Drug company drugs because they wouldn’t need huge advertising budgets. There are so many ways the NHS could make more money for itself that could then be used to deliver newer and better treatments. Yes, it is a shift in ideology and culture, but I am sure it would have positive outcomes for the NHS and patients. If you have any ideas on how the NHS could produce more money then please do leave a comment.  
jacob matthews
over 7 years ago
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Beans, Greens, and the Best Foods for the Brain

The latest research on how diet can influence mental health.  
medscape.com
over 6 years ago
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A man with fever, a productive cough, and a striking chest radiograph

A 41 year old man presented to the emergency department with a two week history of worsening shortness of breath. Associated symptoms included a cough productive of green sputum, intermittent fevers, night sweats, and non-pleuritic pain in the right side of the chest wall. He had a history of chronic pancreatitis secondary to alcohol excess, which was complicated by diet controlled type 2 diabetes. He also smoked 40 cigarettes a day.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 6 years ago
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Edible Glycerin Uses, Benefits, Safety, Side Effects

Glycerin (glycerine, glycerol) is a sugar alcohol (a carbohydrate) used as a food additive. Glycerin syrup is used as a sweetener.  
nutrientsreview.com
over 6 years ago
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Celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

Celiac disease is a multisystem immune based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The prevalence of celiac disease has risen in recent decades and is currently about 1% in most Western populations. The reason for this rise is unknown, although environmental factors related to the hygiene hypothesis are suspected. The pathophysiology of celiac disease involves both the innate and adaptive immune response to dietary gluten. Clinical features are diverse and include gastrointestinal symptoms, metabolic bone disease, infertility, and many other manifestations. Although a gluten-free diet is effective in most patients, this diet can be burdensome and can limit quality of life; consequently, non-dietary therapies are at various stages of development. This review also covers non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The pathophysiology of this clinical phenotype is poorly understood, but it is a cause of increasing interest in gluten-free diets in the general population.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 6 years ago
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Free Calorie Counter, Diet & Exercise Journal | MyFitnessPal.com

Free online calorie counter and diet plan. Lose weight by tracking your caloric intake quickly and easily. Find nutrition facts for over 2,000,000 foods.  
myfitnesspal.com
over 7 years ago
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Does it matter what your Cholesterol is when you are in your 20's?

BP and cholesterol are major contributors to cardiovascular disease. Most people only start becoming aware of how high their BP and cholesterol is in middle age. Often by then there has already been significant damage to the cardiovascular system. Would it be sensible for health conscious young people to ask their GP for a cholesterol blood test roughly once a year? Therefore, enabling them to alter their diet and control their weight at a younger age and potentially reduce later heart disease.  
jacob matthews
over 8 years ago
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Low-fat diet and gallstones

Diet high in fat may reduce the risk of gallstones during rapid weight loss: http://www.nutrientsreview.com/lipids/fats.html Diet high in saturated fat may increase the risk of gallstones. Meals high in fat supposedly trigger pain in gallbladder stones disease, and many doctors recommend low-fat meals to prevent the pain http://www.patient.co.uk/health/gallstones-diet-sheet My questions: Do high-fat meals really trigger pain in gallbladder stone disease? Any experience with patients? Would you, as a doctor, recommend a low-fat diet to someone who already has gallstones?  
Jan Modric
over 7 years ago
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Study links methionine-rich diet to increased risk of memory loss

Researchers suggest a diet high in the amino acid methionine leads to hypermethylation of an important brain protein, which promotes memory loss.  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 7 years ago