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A new piece in the 'French paradox' puzzle -- cheese metabolism

Figuring out why the French have low cardiovascular disease rates despite a diet high in saturated fats has spurred research and many theories to account for this phenomenon known as the 'French paradox.' Most explanations focus on wine and lifestyle, but a key role could belong to another French staple: cheese. The evidence, say scientists in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, is in cheese metabolism.  
eurekalert.org
almost 7 years ago
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Dr Jason Fung on the impact of diet on obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus

Stream Dr Jason Fung on the impact of diet on obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 7 years ago
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32

Aseem Malhotra on the impact of diet on heart disease #Don’tFearTheFat

Stream Aseem Malhotra on the impact of diet on heart disease #Don’tFearTheFat by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 7 years ago
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Diet and exercise in pregnancy for preventing gestational diabetes mellitus | Cochrane

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is high blood glucose (hyperglycaemia) first occurring or first recognised during pregnancy. Between 1% and 14% of pregnant women develop GDM, with some at a higher risk than others (for example, women who are overweight or obese, older, of particular ethnicities, have had GDM previously, or have a family history of type II diabetes). GDM can cause significant health problems for mothers and babies. The babies may grow very large and, as a result, be injured at birth, or cause injury to mothers during birth. Women with GDM have an increased risk of having an induced birth, of their babies being born by caesarean section, and of having a preterm birth (before 37 weeks of pregnancy). Additionally, there can be long-term health problems for mothers and babies, including an increased risk of type II diabetes. Some diets (for example, those with low fibre and high glycaemic load) and physical inactivity, are potentially modifiable risk factors for GDM. There is evidence that lifestyle interventions in the general population (promoting diet and exercise changes) can prevent type II diabetes, and it has been suggested that these interventions may help prevent GDM in pregnancy.  
cochrane.org
almost 7 years ago
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Policy to improve England’s diet has failed, study finds

Evidence is scant that a voluntary agreement between the government and food manufacturers to improve eating habits has worked, a study has concluded.1  
feeds.bmj.com
over 6 years ago
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Powders of iron plus other micronutrients for home (point-of-use) fortification of foods consumed by pregnant women | Cochrane

Pregnant women are particularly vulnerable to nutrient deficiencies due to the requirements of the growing baby during the pregnancy. In low-income countries, many women have diets with low content of vitamins and minerals, and they participate in long hours of physical labour. They are also exposed to recurrent infections, which make nutritional deficiencies worse. Thus, lack of adequate nutrition can contribute to the poor health of these women their babies.  
cochrane.org
over 6 years ago