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DrugInteractions

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Novel oral anticoagulants for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis | Cochrane

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a condition in which a blood clot forms in the deep vein of the leg or pelvis. It affects approximately 1 in 1000 people. If it is not treated, the clot can travel in the blood and block the arteries in the lungs. This life-threatening condition is called a pulmonary embolism (PE) and occurs in approximately 3 to 4 per 10,000 people. The chances of getting a DVT can be increased if people have certain risk factors. These include previous clots, prolonged periods of immobility (such as travelling on aeroplanes or bed rest), cancer, exposure to oestrogens (pregnancy, oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy), trauma and blood disorders such as thrombophilia (abnormal blood clotting). A DVT is diagnosed through determining the risk factors and performing an ultrasound of the leg veins. If a DVT is confirmed, people are treated with an anticoagulant. This medicine prevents further clots from forming. Until recently, the drugs of choice were heparin, fondaparinux and vitamin K antagonists. However, these drugs can cause side effects and have limitations. Two further classes of novel oral anticoagulants have been developed: these are called direct thrombin inhibitors (DTI) and factor Xa inhibitors. There are particular reasons why oral DTIs and factor Xa inhibitors might now be better medicines to use. They can be given orally, they have a predictable effect, they do not require frequent monitoring or re-dosing and they have few known drug interactions. This review measures the effectiveness and safety of these new drugs with conventional treatment.  
cochrane.org
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
0
39

Guidelines, polypharmacy, and drug-drug interactions in patients with multimorbidity

Polypharmacy, defined as the chronic co-prescription of several drugs, is often the consequence of the application of disease specific guidelines, targeting disease specific goals, to patients with multiple chronic diseases. One common consequence of polypharmacy is the high rate of adverse drug reactions, mainly from drug-drug interactions (the ability of a drug to modify the action or effect of another drug administered successively or simultaneously).1 The risk of a drug-drug interaction in any particular patient increases with the number of co-existing diseases and the number of drugs prescribed.2  
feeds.bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
2
73

Guidelines, polypharmacy, and drug-drug interactions in patients with multimorbidity

Polypharmacy, defined as the chronic co-prescription of several drugs, is often the consequence of the application of disease specific guidelines, targeting disease specific goals, to patients with multiple chronic diseases. One common consequence of polypharmacy is the high rate of adverse drug reactions, mainly from drug-drug interactions (the ability of a drug to modify the action or effect of another drug administered successively or simultaneously).1 The risk of a drug-drug interaction in any particular patient increases with the number of co-existing diseases and the number of drugs prescribed.2  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
23

Guidelines, polypharmacy, and drug-drug interactions in patients with multimorbidity

Polypharmacy, defined as the chronic co-prescription of several drugs, is often the consequence of the application of disease specific guidelines, targeting disease specific goals, to patients with multiple chronic diseases. One common consequence of polypharmacy is the high rate of adverse drug reactions, mainly from drug-drug interactions (the ability of a drug to modify the action or effect of another drug administered successively or simultaneously).1 The risk of a drug-drug interaction in any particular patient increases with the number of co-existing diseases and the number of drugs prescribed.2  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago