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Preview
5
101

In the Hands

What to look for in the hands when performing a general clinical examination -- perfect for the medical student on their first placement. Far from comprehensive, but an excellent starting point if you're not quite sure what approach to take. Part of our series on basic clinical examination. If you enjoyed this video, why not subscribe for all the latest from HippocraTV? And let us know what you'd like us to cover next -- like all good educationalists, we can't get enough of that sweet, sweet feedback. Now get out there and see some patients! Music: Brittle Raille by Kevin Macleod Cool Vibes by Kevin Macleod Dub Feral by Kevin Macleod Local Forecast by Kevin Macleod Groove Grove by Kevin Macleod (all via the wonderful Incompetech.com) Special thanks to Harrison Ferguson Disclaimer: HippocraTV is not affiliated with any medical school or NHS trust. While we make a great effort to ensure our content is correct and up-to-date, watching YouTube is not a substitute for reading a textbook, attending a lecture or seeing a real-life patient.  
Hippocrates
almost 8 years ago
Preview
5
109

Cardiology - Relationship of conduction system, ventricular contraction and ECG

Very cool hand-drawn diagrams. More at http://armandoh.org/ and https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan  
YouTube
over 7 years ago
Preview
5
182

A Guide to Preeclampsia: Hand-drawn Tutorial

All credit for this video goes to professor May. If there is anything on it that sounds inspirational, it most likely came from her.  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 a5gegv?1444774173
5
192

Commitment Issues

I recently read a question on meducation posted around a year ago, the jist of which was “as a medical student, is it too early to start developing commitment to a specialty?” I.e. “even though I haven’t graduated yet, should I start building a portfolio of experience and evidence to show that specialty X is what I really want to do?” MMC revolutionised (for better or worse) the medical career structure forcing new graduates to decide on a career path much earlier. Many have appreciated the clear delineation of their career pathway. Others have found the 15 month period between leaving university and applying for specialty training too short to make an informed decision (just ask the 10% of FY2s that took a career break last year (i)). Whether right or wrong, there is now less time to rotate round ‘SHO’ jobs, decide on a career and build a CV capable of winning over an interview panel. You’ll probably find you’re in one of 2 camps at university: Those who are absolutely 110% certain there is nothing they want to do, ever, other than specialty X, or Those who really like specialty X, but also like specialties W, Y and Z and haven't made up their minds (A few people find themselves feeling they don’t want to be part of any medical career, but that’s for another post.) Students identifying with the first statement are usually concerned they will not get enough general experience, or that they will be stuck with their decision if they change their minds later on. Those who are leaning more towards statement 2 may not build as strong a body of evidence for any one specialty; however it’s possible to get involved in activities either relevant to a few career options, or several specialty-specific activities and subsequently edit the CV for a specific interview. The key message is that whether you think you have your career mapped out or not, medical school is the perfect time to start collecting evidence that you’re interested in a career in a particular specialty: time for extra-curricular activities only becomes scarcer when you have a full time job complete with working long days, nights and weekends. Your experiences at medical school can then be supplemented with taster weeks, teaching and judicious use of your study budget for training days and conferences; bear in mind that all specialties allow at least 3 years* following FY2 before starting specialty training which can be used for gaining further experience (but be prepared to justify and defend your actions). It’s also important to consider the manner in which individual specialties require such a commitment to be demonstrated: In general terms, the more niche and/or competitive the specialty, the more they will want you to demonstrate that you a) really know what the job entails and b) have made a concerted effort to further your knowledge of the subject. To get a job in neurosurgery for example, which is not only niche but had a completion ratio of 4.9 in 2013(ii) you’ll need to have gone to courses relevant to neurosurgery and have achievements related to the specialty such as a neurosurgical elective, attachment or taster experience(iii). Some specialties assess commitment in a variety of situations e.g. the radiology interview this year had stations on the general overview and future of radiology as a career, a CV based demonstration of commitment to specialty as well as a station requiring the interpretation of images. General Practice on the other hand which in its very nature is very broad, at no point allocates marks specifically for commitment to specialty (or anything else on a CV for that matter) as it is entirely dependent on an exam (SJTs and clinical questions) and skill-based stations at a selection centre. The person specification* details what is expected and desirable as demonstration of commitment in each specialty. So, how do you actually show you’re committed to a specialty? It may be pretty obvious but try to get a consistent and well-rounded CV. Consider: • Joining a student committee or group for your specialty. If there isn't one at your university, find some like-minded people and start one • Asking the firms you work for if you can help with an audit/research even if data collection doesn’t sound very interesting • Finding a research project (e.g. as part of a related intercalated or higher degree) • Prizes and examinations relevant to the specialty • Developing a relevant teaching programme • Selecting your selected study modules/components, elective and dissertation with your chosen specialty in mind • Going to teaching or study days aimed at students at the relevant Royal College Remember it’s not just what you’ve done but also what you’ve learnt from it; get into a habit of reflecting on what each activity has helped you achieve or understand. This is where most people who appear to have the perfect CV come unstuck: There will always be someone who has more presentations and publications etc. etc. but don’t be put off that it means they are a dead cert for the job. Whatever you do, make sure you have EVIDENCE that you’ve done it. Become a bit obsessive. Trust me, you forget a lot and nothing counts if you can’t prove it. Assessing commitment to specialty aims to highlight who really understands and wants a career in that specialty. From my own recent experience however, just identifying experiences explicitly related to a specific specialty ignores the transferable and clinically/professionally/personally important skills one has that would make them a successful trainee. I’d be very interested in your views on ‘commitment to specialty’: for example do you think the fact someone has 20 papers in a given specialty means they are necessarily the best for the job? Or are you planning to take a year out post-FY2 to build on your CV to gain more experience? Let us know! References *See person specifications for specialty-specific details at http://specialtytraining.hee.nhs.uk/specialty-recruitment/person-specifications-2013/ i. http://www.foundationprogramme.nhs.uk/download.asp?file=F2_career_destination_report_November_2013.pdf ii. http://specialtytraining.hee.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/sites/475/2013/03/Specialty-Training-2013.pdf iii. http://specialtytraining.hee.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/sites/475/2013/03/2014-PS-NEUROSURGERY-ST1-1.02.pdf  
Dr Lydia Spurr
almost 8 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 e9tc1t?1444774226
5
243

Grand Round: Dos and Don’ts

“To study the phenomena of disease without books is to sail an uncharted sea, while to study books without patients is not to go to sea at all.” The words of Sir William Osler, the acclaimed father of modern medicine, are still no less profound. They hark from an age when medicine still retained a sense of ceremony: an amphitheatre filled to the rafters, the clinicians poised in their white coats and ties, all eyes convergent on their quarry or rather the patient seated before them. Any memory of such scenes live out a vestigial existence in black&white photos or histrionic depictions recalling the rise of modern medicine. To think this is how the tradition of grand rounds proceeded in the not so distant past. Today grand rounds have a more tuitional flavour to them. The Socratic dialogue which reportedly took place has been superseded by the much less appetising PowerPoint presentation. It’s a weekly event marked in the calendar. For the ever-busy junior doctor it at least offers the prospect of a free lunch. I gest, they serve a social as well as an educational function. On the other hand medical student grand rounds are purely a learning exercise. They are most importantly not a race to find and present the most ‘interesting’ case in the trust because this is usually interpretted as a vanishingly rare condition, which even your ejudicating consultant has never encountered in a lifetime of experience. It falls short of the primary aim: to learn about the patients who you will be seeing as a junior doctor and as the addage goes - common things are common. What will make your grand round interesting, is not the patient you choose but how you choose to present that patient. Unfortunately, as fair a point Sir Osler makes, the old practice of patient participation in grand rounds has long since faded. You will have to call upon your thespian talents to retell the story to your fellow students. Of course not everyone’s a natural showman, however fortune favours the prepared and in my experience there are only a handful of things to worry about. Structure. This is the back bone of your presentation. Obviously a solid introductory line about the patient with all the salient points goes without saying, it’s no different to presenting to the consultant on ward rounds or in the clinic. Always set the scene. If you clerked your patient on a hectic night oncall down in majors, then say so. It makes the case less one dimensional. The history is your chance to show off - to consider the presenting complaint expressed in the patient’s own words and to form a working differential, which you can encourage your colleagues to reel off at the outset. The quality of the history should guide your audience to the right diagnosis. Equip them with all the information they need, so not just the positive findings. Showing that you have ruled out important red flag symptoms or signs will illustrate good detective work on your part. However you wish to order the relevant past medical/family history, medications, social impact etc is up to you. It’s a subjective thing, you just have to play the game and cater to the consultant’s likes. You can only gage these after a few cases so do the honourable thing and let your colleagues present first. Performance. Never read your slides in front of an audience. Their attention will rapidly wane (especially if they’re postprandial). The slides are an aide-memoire and to treat them as a script is to admit your presence adds nothing more to your presentation. Communicating with the audience requires you to present uncluttered slides, expanding on short headings and obliging your colleagues to listen for the little nuggets of clinical knowledge you have so generously lain in store. Insight. When the consultant asks you the significance of an investigation, always know on what grounds it was ordered and the limitations of the results. The astute student will be aware of its diagnostic or prognostic potential.The same may be said of imaging. Perusing the radiologists report and using it to guide the audience through (anoynmised) CXRs, CTs, US etc is a feather in your cap. Literature reviews of your choosing constitute a mandatory part of the presentation. They are demonstrative of not only your wider reading but your initiative to find the relevant evidence base e.g. the research underlying the management plan of a condition or perhaps its future treatments. Timing. Waffling is only detrimental to the performance. Rehearsing the presentation with a firm mate is a sure way to keep to time constraints. Memorability, for the right reasons, relies on a concise and interactive presentation. A splash of imagination will not go unnoticed. The consultant marking you has seen it all before; surprising titbits of knowledge or amusing quirks in your presentation will hopefully appeal to their curious and humorous side. If anything it might break the tedium grand rounds are renown for. Oratory is a universal skill and is responsible for so much (undue) anxiety. The more timid can take comfort grand rounds aren’t quite the grand occasions they used to be. Illustrator Edward Wong This blog post is a reproduction of an article published in the Medical Student Newspaper, December 2013 issue.  
James Wong
almost 8 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 zwf33b?1444774244
5
97

"So are you enjoying it?"

"When did the pain start Mr Smith?" "Ah so do you enjoy it?" 'It' of course refers to your five year medical degree. Patients can be nice can't they. Often it seems that all patients want to talk about is you. I thought the public didn't like students, aren't students lazy drunks who wake up at midday, squander their government hand-outs on designer clothes, and whose prevailing role in society was to keep the nation's budget baked bean industry in the black? Apparently the same isn't thought of medical students, well maybe it is, but god patients are polite. The thing is I have found these questions difficult; it is surprising how they can catch you off guard. Asking if I am enjoying 'it' after I have woken up at dawn, sat on a bus for 40 minutes, and hunted down a clinician who had no idea I was meant to be there, could lead on to a very awkward consultation. But of course it doesn't "yes it is really good thank you". "Do you take any medications, either from your GP or over the counter?" "Are you training to be a GP then?" Medicine is a fascinating topic and indeed career, which surely human nature makes us all interested in. As individuals lucky enough to be studying it, maybe we forget how intriguing the medical profession is? This paired with patients sat in a small formal environment with someone they don’t know could bring out the polite ‘Michael Parkinson’ in anybody. Isn't this just good manners, taking an interest. Well yes. Just because I can be faintly aloof doesn't mean the rest of the world has to me. But perhaps there is a little more to it, we ask difficult personal questions, sometimes without even knowing it, we all know when taking a sexual history to expect the consultation to be awkward or embarrassing, but people can be apprehensive talking about anything, be it their cardiovascular disease, medications, even their date of birth. We often then go on to an examination: inspecting from the end of the bed, exposing a patient, palpating. Given a bit context you can see why a patient may want to shift the attention back to someone like us for a bit, and come on, the medical student is fair game, the best target, asking the consultant whether they enjoys their job, rather you than me. If we can oblige, and make a patient feel a bit more at ease we should, and it certainly won't be doing our student patient relationship any harm. Hopefully next time my answers will be a bit more forthcoming. "Any change in your bowels, blood in any motions?" "How many years do you have left?" It is a good thing we are all polite.  
Joe de Silva
almost 8 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 vvr5q9?1444774253
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193

Clinics - Making the most of it

Commencing the first clinical year is a milestone. Things will now be different as your student career steers straight into the unchartered waters of clinical medicine. New challenges and responsibilities lie ahead and not just in an academic sense. After all this is the awaited moment, the start of the apprenticeship you have so desired and laboured for. It won’t be long before these clinical years like the preclinical years before them, will seem just as distant and insular, so why not make the most of it? The first days hold so much excitation and promise and for many they deliver, however, it would be wise not to be too optimistic. I am afraid your firm head standing abreast the doors in a prophetic splaying of arms is an unlikely sight. In this new clinical environment, it is natural to be a little flummoxed. The quizzical looks of doctors and nurses as you first walk in, a sure sign of your unexpected arrival, is a recurring theme. If the wards are going to be your new hunting ground, proper introductions with the medical team are in order. This might seem like a task of Herculean proportions, particularly in large teaching hospitals. Everyone is busy. Junior doctors scuttling around the ward desks job lists in hand, the registrar probably won’t have noticed you and as luck would have it your consultant firm head is away at a conference. Perseverance during these periods of frustration is a rewarding quality. Winning over the junior doctors with some keenness will help you no end. What I mean to say is that their role in our learning as students extends further than the security of sign-off signatures a week before the end of the rotation. They will give you opportunities. Take them! Although it never feels like it at the time, being a medical student does afford some privileges. The student badge clipped to your new clinic clothes is a license to learn: to embark on undying streaks of false answers, to fail as many skills and clerkings as is required and to do so unabashed. Unfortunately, the junior doctors are not there purely for your benefit, they cannot always spare the time to directly observe a history taking or an examination, instead you must report back. With practice this becomes more of a tick box exercise: gleaning as much information and then reconfiguring it into a structured presentation. However, the performance goes unseen and unheard. I do not need to iterate the inherent dangers of this practice. Possible solutions? Well receiving immediate feedback is more obtainable on GP visits or at outpatient clinics. They provide many opportunities to test your questioning style and bedside manner. Performing under scrutiny recreates OSCE conditions. Due to time pressure and no doubt the diagnostic cogs running overtime, it is fatefully easy to miss emotional cues or derail a conversation in a way which would be deemed insensitive. Often it occurs subconsciously so take full advantage of a GP or a fellow firm mate’s presence when taking a history. Self-directed learning will take on new meaning. The expanse of clinical knowledge has a vertiginous effect. No longer is there a structured timetable of lectures as a guide; for the most part you are alone. Teaching will become a valued commodity, so no matter how sincere the promises, do not rest until the calendars are out and a mutually agreed time is settled. I would not encourage ambuscaded attacks on staff but taking the initiative to arrange dedicated tutorial time with your superiors is best started early. Consigning oneself to the library and ploughing through books might appear the obvious remedy, it has proven effective for the last 2-3 years after all. But unfortunately it can not all be learnt with bookwork. Whether it is taking a psychiatric history, venipuncture or reading a chest X-ray, these are perishable skills and only repeated and refined practice will make them become second nature. Balancing studying with time on the wards is a challenge. Unsurprisingly, after a day spent on your feet, there is wavering incentive to merely open a book. Keeping it varied will prevent staleness taking hold. Attending a different clinic, brushing up on some pathology at a post-mortem or group study sessions adds flavour to the daily routine. During the heated weeks before OSCEs, group study becomes very attractive. While it does cement clinical skills, do not be fooled. Your colleagues tend not to share the same examination findings you would encounter on an oncology ward nor the measured responses of professional patient actors. So ward time is important but little exposure to all this clinical information will be gained by assuming a watchful presence. Attending every ward round, while a laudable achievement, will not secure the knowledge. Senior members of the team operate on another plane. It is a dazzling display of speed whenever a monster list of patients comes gushing out the printer. Before you have even registered each patient’s problem(s), the management plan has been dictated and written down. There is little else to do but feed off scraps of information drawn from the junior doctors on the journey to the next bed. Of course there will be lulls, when the pace falls off and there is ample time to digest a history. Although it is comforting to have the medical notes to check your findings once the round is over, it does diminish any element of mystery. The moment a patient enters the hospital is the best time to cross paths. At this point all the work is before the medical team, your initial guesses might be as good as anyone else’s. Visiting A&E of your own accord or as part of your medical team’s on call rota is well worth the effort. Being handed the initial A&E clerking and gingerly drawing back the curtain incur a chilling sense of responsibility. Embrace it, it will solidify not only clerking skills but also put into practice the explaining of investigations or results as well as treatment options. If you are feeling keen you could present to the consultant on post-take. Experiences like this become etched in your memory because of their proactive approach. You begin to remember conditions associated with patient cases you have seen before rather than their corresponding pages in the Oxford handbook. And there is something about the small thank you by the F1 or perhaps finding your name alongside theirs on the new patient list the following morning, which rekindles your enthusiasm. To be considered part of the medical team is the ideal position and a comforting thought. Good luck. This blog post is a reproduction of an article published in the Medical Student Newspaper, Freshers 2013 issue.  
James Wong
almost 8 years ago
Preview
4
57

Junior Doctors: Your Life In Their Hands

An episode from BBC series which follows the lives of junior doctors in the UK.  
YouTube
almost 8 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 2hilgx?1444774083
4
1141

So you want to be a medical student: READ THIS!

There are so many sources for advice out there for potential medical students. So many books, so many forums, so many careers advice people, and so many confusing and scary myths, that I thought it might be useful to just put up some simple guidelines on what is required to become a medical student and a short book list to get your started. I am now in my 5th year at university and my 4th year of actual medicine. Since getting into Medical School in 2009 I have gone back to my 6th form college in South Wales at least once a year to talk to the students who wanted to become medical or dental students, to offer some advice, answer any queries that I could. This year, I tried to to do the same sort of thing for high achieving pupils at my old comprehensive, because if you don't get the right advice young enough then you won't be able to do everything that is required of you to get into Medical school straight after your A-levels. Unfortunately, due to some new rules I wasn't allowed to. So, since I couldn't give any advice in person I thought that a blog might be the easiest alternative way to give young comprehensive students a guide in the right direction. So here goes... How to get into medical school: You must show that you have the academic capacity to cope with the huge volume of information that will try to teach you and that you have the determination/tenacity to achieve what you need to. To show this you must get good grades: a. >8A*s at GCSE + separate science modules if possible = you have to be able to do science. b. >3A’s at A-Level = Chemistry + Biology + anything else you want, as long as you can get an A. 2. You must have an understanding of what Medicine really involves: a. Work experience with a doctor – local GP, hospital work experience day, family connections, school connections – you should try to get as much as you can but don’t worry if you can’t because you can make up for it in other areas. b. Work experience with any health care professional – ask to see what a nurse/ physio/ health care assistant/ phlebotomist/ ward secretary does. Any exposure to the clinical environment will give you an insight into what happens and gives you something to talk about during personal statements and interviews. c. Caring experience – apply to help out in local care homes, in disabled people’s homes, at charities, look after younger pupils at school. All these sorts of things help to show that you are dedicated, motivated and that you want to help people. 3. Be a fully rounded human being: a. Medical schools do not want robots! They want students who are smart but who are also able to engage with the common man. So hobbies and interests are a good way of showing that you are more than just a learner. b. Playing on sports teams allows you to write about how you have developed as a person and helps you develop essential characteristics like team work, fair play, learning to follow commands, learning to think for yourself, hand-eye co-ordination etc. etc. All valuable for a career in medicine. c. Playing an instrument again shows an ability to learn and the will power to sit and perfect a skill. It also provides you with useful skills that you can use to be sociable and make friends, such as joining student choirs, orchestras and bands or just playing some tunes at a party. d. Do fun things! Medicine is hard work so you need to be able to do something that will help you relax and allow you to blow off some stress. All work and no play, makes a burnt out wreck! 4. Have a basic knowledge of: a. The news, especially the health news – Daily Telegraph health section on a Monday, BBC news etc. b. The career of a doctor – how does it work? How many years of training? What roles would you do? What exams do you need to pass? How many years at medical school? c. The GMC – know about the “Tomorrow’s Doctor” Document – search google. d. The BMA e. The Department of Health and NHS structure – know the basics! GP commissioning bodies, strategic health authorities. f. What the Medical School you are applying to specialises in, does it do lots of cancer research? Does it do dissection? Does it pride itself on the number of GPs it produces? Does it require extra entry exams or what is the interview process? These 4 points are very basic and are just a very rough guide to consider for anyone applying to become a medical student. There are many more things you can do and loads of useful little tips that you will pick up along the way. If anyone has any great tips they would like to share then please do leave them as a comment below! My final thought for this blog is; READ, READ and READ some more. I am sure that the reason I got into medical school was because I had read so many inspiring and thought provoking books, I had something to say in interviews and I had already had ideas planted in my head by the books that I could then bring up for discussion with the interview panel when asked about ethical dilemmas or where medicine is going. Plus reading books about medicine can be so inspiring that they really can push your life in a whole new direction or just give you something to chat about with friends and family. Everyone loves to chat people – how they work, why they are ill, what shapes peoples' personalities etc and these are all a part of medicine that you can read into! Book Recommendations Must reads: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Trust-Me-Im-Junior-Doctor/dp/0340962054/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374240729&sr=1-1&keywords=trust+me+i%27m+a+junior+doctor http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rise-Fall-Modern-Medicine/dp/0349123756/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374240763&sr=1-1&keywords=the+rise+and+fall+of+modern+medicine http://www.amazon.co.uk/Selfish-Gene-30th-Anniversary/dp/0199291152/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374240793&sr=1-1&keywords=the+selfish+gene http://student.bmj.com/student/student-bmj.html http://www.newscientist.com/subs/offer?pg=bdlecpyhvyhuk1306&prom=1234&gclid=CLT0tZ3Wu7gCFfLHtAodWwUAyA http://www.amazon.co.uk/Man-Who-Mistook-His-Wife/dp/B005M1NBYY/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374240909&sr=1-3&keywords=the+man+who+mistook+his+wife+for+a+hat http://www.amazon.co.uk/Better-Surgeons-Performance-Atul-Gawande/dp/1861976577/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374240987&sr=1-1&keywords=better+atul+gawande http://www.amazon.co.uk/House-Black-Swan-Samuel-Shem/dp/0552991228/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241124&sr=1-1&keywords=the+house+of+god+samuel+shem http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bad-Science-Ben-Goldacre/dp/000728487X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241298&sr=1-1&keywords=bad+science+ben+goldacre Thought provokers: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Complications-Surgeons-Notes-Imperfect-Science/dp/1846681324/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241026&sr=1-1&keywords=atul+gawande+complications http://www.amazon.co.uk/Checklist-Manifesto-How-Things-Right/dp/1846683149/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241049&sr=1-1&keywords=atul+gawande+checklist http://www.amazon.co.uk/Brave-New-World-Aldous-Huxley/dp/0099518473/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241067&sr=1-1&keywords=aldous+huxley http://www.amazon.co.uk/Island-Aldous-Huxley/dp/0099477777/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241093&sr=1-1&keywords=aldous+huxley+island http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mount-Misery-Samuel-Shem/dp/055277622X/ref=pd_sim_b_4 http://www.amazon.co.uk/Psychopath-Test-Jon-Ronson/dp/0330492276/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241180&sr=1-1&keywords=the+psychopath+test http://www.amazon.co.uk/Drugs-Without-Minimising-Harms-Illegal/dp/1906860165/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241197&sr=1-1&keywords=drugs+without+the+hot+air http://www.amazon.co.uk/How-Win-Friends-Influence-People/dp/0091906814/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241222&sr=1-1&keywords=how+to+win+friends+and+influence+people http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bad-Pharma-companies-mislead-patients/dp/0007350740/ref=pd_bxgy_b_img_y Final Final Thought: Just go into your local book shop or library and go to the pop-science section and read the first thing that takes your interest! It will almost always give you something to talk about.  
jacob matthews
over 8 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1u6up6r?1444774235
4
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Keep on Truckin’

Shattered. Third consecutive day of on-calls at the birth centre. I’m afraid I have little to show for it. The logbook hangs limply at my side, the pages where my name is printed await signatures; surrogate markers of new found skills. Half asleep I slump against the wall and cast my mind back to the peripheral attachment from which I have not long returned. The old-school consultant’s mutterings are still fresh: “Medical education was different back then you see....you are dealt a tough hand nowadays.” I quite agree, it is Saturday. Might it be said the clinical apprenticeship we know today is a shadow of its former self? Medical school was more a way of life, students lived in the hospital, they even had their laundry done for them. Incredulous, I could scarcely restrain a chuckle at the consultant’s stories of delivering babies while merely a student and how the dishing out of “character building” grillings by their seniors was de rigeur. Seldom am I plied with any such questions. Teaching is a rare commodity at times. Hours on a busy ward can bear little return. Frequently do I hear students barely a rotation into their clinical years, bemoan a woeful lack of attention. All recollection of the starry-eyed second year, romanced by anything remotely clinical, has evaporated like the morning dew. “Make way, make way!...” cries a thin voice from the far reaches of the centre. A squeal of bed wheels. The newly crowned obs & gynae reg drives past the midwife station executing an impressive Tokyo drift into the corridor where I stand. Through the theatre doors opposite me he vanishes. I follow. Major postpartum haemorrhage. A bevy of scrubs flit across the room in a live performance of the RCOG guidelines for obstetric haemorrhage. They resuscitate the women on the table, her clammy body flat across the carmine blotched sheets. ABC, intravenous access and a rapid two litres of Hartmann’s later, the bleeding can not be arrested by rubbing up contraction. Pharmacological measures: syntocinon and ergometrine preparations do not staunch the flow. Blood pressure still falling, I watch the consciousness slowly ebb from the woman’s eyes. Then in a tone of voice, seemingly beyond his years, the reversely gowned anaesthetist clocks my badge and says, “Fetch me the carboprost.” I could feel an exercise in futility sprout as I gave an empty but ingratiating nod. “It’s hemabate....in the fridge” he continues. In the anaesthetic room I find the fridge and rummage blindly through. Thirty seconds later having discovered nothing but my general inadequacy, I crawl back into theatre. I was as good as useless though to my surprise the anaesthetist disappeared and returned with a vial. Handing me both it and a prepped syringe, he instructs me to inject intramuscularly into the woman’s thigh. The most common cause of postpartum haemorrhage is uterine atony. Prostaglandin analogues like carboprost promote coordinated contractions of the body of the pregnant uterus. Constriction of the vessels by myometrial fibres within the uterine walls achieves postpartum haemostasis. This textbook definition does not quite echo my thoughts as I gingerly approach the operating table. Alarmingly I am unaware that aside from the usual side effects of the drug in my syringe; the nausea and vomiting, should the needle stray into a nearby vessel and its contents escape into the circulation, cardiovascular collapse might be the unfortunate result. Suddenly the anaesthetist’s dour expression as I inject now assumes some meaning. What a relief to see the woman’s vitals begin to stabilise. As we wheel her into the recovery bay, the anaesthetist unleashes an onslaught of questions. Keen to redeem some lost pride, I can to varying degrees, resurrect long buried preclinical knowledge: basic pharmacology, transfusion-related complications, the importance of fresh frozen plasma. Although, the final threat of drawing the clotting cascade from memory is a challenge too far. Before long I am already being demonstrated the techniques of regional analgesia, why you should always aspirate before injecting lidocaine and thrust headlong into managing the most common adverse effects of epidurals. To have thought I had been ready to retire home early on this Saturday morning had serendipity not played its part. A little persistence would have been just as effective. It’s the quality so easily overlooked in these apparently austere times of medical education. And not a single logbook signature gained. Oh the shame! This blog post is a reproduction of an article published in the Medical Student Newspaper, February 2014 issue.  
James Wong
almost 8 years ago
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Lobster hand reconstruction

Lobster hand reconstruction  
Chris Oliver
almost 12 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 riytde?1444773947
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Reflection

Just as a bit of an intro, my name is Conrad Hayes, I'm a 4th year medical student studying in Staffordshire. My medical school are quite big on getting us into the habit of writing down reflections. It's something I feel I do subconsciously whilst I'm with patients or in teaching sessions, but frankly I suck at the written bit and I feel on the whole it's probably because there's nobody discussing this with us or telling me I'm an idiot for some of the things I may think/say! So I think if I'm going to attempt to complete a blog then I am going to do it in a reflective style and I do look forward to peoples feedback and discussions. I'll try to do it daily and see if that works out well, or weekly. But hopefully even if it doesn't get much response it can just be a store for me to look back on things! (Providing I keep up with it). So I'll start now, with a short reflection on my career aspirations which have been pretty much firmed up, but today I gave a presentation that I felt really galvanised me into this. So I want to do Emergency Medicine and Expedition Medicine (on the side more than as my main job). Emergency Medicine appeals to me as I love primary care and being the first to see patients, but I want to see them when they're ill and have a role in the puzzle solving, as it were, that is their issues. Possibly more to the point I want to do this in a high pressure environment where acutely ill individuals come in, and I feel (having done placements in A&E and GP and AMU) A&E is the place for me to be. Expedition Medicine on the other hand is something I accidentally stumbled upon really. In 2nd year I was part of a podcast group MedHeads that we tried to set up at my medical school. I interviewed Dr Amy Hughes of Expedition & Wilderness Medicine, a UK company, and I got really excited about the concepts she was talking about. Practicing medicine in the middle of nowhere, limited resources and sometimes only personal accumen and ingenuity to help you through. It sounded perfect! And since then I've wanted to do it, particularly being interested in Mountain Medicine and getting involved with some research groups. Today in front of my group I gave a presentation on the effects of altitude on the brain (I'm on Neurology at the moment and we had to pick a topic that interested us). I spoke for 15 minutes, a concept that usually terrifies me truth be told, and I thoroughly enjoyed myself. Now I've given a fair number of presentations but this was the first time I was actively excited and really happy about talking! It seems to me that if that isn't the definition of why you should go for a job, then I need to talk to a careers advisor. This experience has definitely ensured I pursue this course with every resource I have available to me! I would be interested in hearing how other people feel about their careers panning out and what got them into it so feel free to leave a comment!!  
Conrad Hayes
almost 9 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 7owyf5?1444773963
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Benchmarking Outpatient Referral Rates

Introduction GPs for a little while have been asked to compare each other’s outpatient referrals rates. The idea is that this peer to peer open review will help us understand each others referral patterns. For some reason and due to a natural competitive nature of human behaviour, I think we have these peer to peer figures put to us to try to get us to refer less into hospital outpatients. It’s always hard to benchmark GP surgeries but outpatient referral benchmarking is particularly poor for several reasons It's Very Difficult to Normalise Surgeries Surgeries have different mortalities morbidities ages and other confounding factors that it becomes very hard to create an algorithm to create a weighting factor to properly compare one surgery against another. There Are Several Reasons For The Referral I’ll go into more detail on this point later but there are several reasons why doctors refer patients into hospital which can range from: doctors knowing a lot about the condition and picking up subtle symptoms and signs lesser experienced doctors would have ignored; all the way to not knowing about the condition and needing some advice from an expert in the condition. We Need To Look At The Bigger Picture The biggest killer to our budget is non-elective admissions and it’s the one area where patient, commissioner and doctor converge. Patients want to keep out of hospital, it’s cheaper for the NHS and Doctors don’t like the lack of continuity when patients go in. For me I see every admission to hospital as a fail. Of course it’s more complex than this and it might be totally appropriate but if we work on this concept backwards, it will help us more. Likewise if we try to reduce outpatient referrals because we are pressurised to, they may end up in hospitalisation and cost the NHS £10,000s rather than £100s as an outpatient. We need to look at the bigger picture and refer especially if we believe that referrals will lead to less hospitalisation of patients further down the line. To put things into perspective 2 symptoms patients present which I take very seriously are palpitations in the elderly and breathlessness. Both symptoms are very real and normally lead to undiagnosed conditions which if we don’t tackle and diagnose early enough will cause patients to deteriorate and end up in hospital. Education, Education, Education When I first went into commissioning as a lead in 2006 I had this idea of getting to the bottom of why GPs refer patients to outpatients. The idea being if we knew why, we would know how to best tackle specialities. I asked my GPs to record which speciality to refer to and why they referred over a 7 month period. The reason for admission was complex but we divided them up into these categories: 2nd care input required for management of the condition. We know about the condition but have drawn the line with what we can do in primary care. An example of this is when we’ve done a 24 hour tape and found a patient has 2sec pauses and needs a pace maker. 2nd care input required for diagnosis. We think this patient has these symptoms which are related to this condition but don’t really know about the diagnosis and need help with this. An example of this is when a patient presents with diarrhoea to a gastroenterologist There could be several reasons for this and we need help from the gastroenterologist to confirm the diagnosis via a colonscopy and ogd etc. Management Advice. We know what the patient has but need help with managing the condition. For example uncontrolled heart failure or recurrent sinusitis. Consultant to Consultant Referral. As advised between consultants. Patient Choice. Sometimes the patient just wants to see the hospital doctor. The results are enclosed here in Excel and displayed below. Please click on the graph thumbnail below. Reasons For Referrals Firstly a few disclaimers and thoughts. These figures were before any GPSI ENT, Dermatology or Musculosketal services which probably would have made an impact on the figures. There are a few anomalies which may need further thought eg I’m surprised Rheumatology for 2nd input for diagnosis is so low, as frequently I have patients with high ESRs and CRPs which I need advise on diagnoses. Also audiology medicine doesn’t quite look right. The cardiology referral is probably high for management advise due to help on ECG interpretation although this is an assumption. This is just a 7 month period from a subset of 8-9 GPs. Although we were careful to explain each category and it’s meaning, more work might need to be done to clarify the findings further. In my opinion the one area where GPs need to get grips with is management advice as it’s an admission that I know what the patient has and need help on how to treat them. This graph is listed in order of management advice for this reason. So what do you do to respond to this? The most logical step is to education GPs on the left hand side of this graph and invest in your work force but more and more I see intermediary GPSI services which are the provider arm of a commissioning group led to help intercept referrals to hospital. In favour of the data most of the left hand side of the graph have been converted into a GPSI service at one point. In my area what has happened is that referrals rates have actually gone up into these services with no decline in the outgoing speciality as GPs become dis-empowered and just off load any symptoms which patients have which they would have probably had a higher threshold to refer on if these GPSI services were not available. Having said that GPSI services can have a role in the pathway and I’m not averse to their implementation, we just have to find a better way to use their services. 3 Step Plan As I’m not one to just give problems here are my 3 suggestions to help referrals. To have a more responsive Layered Outpatient Service. Setting up an 18 week target for all outpatients is strange, as symptoms and specialities need to be prioritised. For example I don’t mind waiting 20 weeks for a ENT referral on a condition which is bothering me but not life threatening but need to only have a 3 week turn over if I’m breathless with a sudden reduction in my exercise tolerance. This adds an extra layer of complexity but always in the back of my mind it’s about getting them seen sooner to prevent hospitalisation. Education, education, education It’s ironic that the first budget to be slashed in my area was education. We need to education our GPs to empower them to bring the management advice category down as this is the category which will make the biggest impact to improving health care. In essence we need to focus on working on the left hand side of this graph first. Diagnose Earlier and Refer Appropriately The worst case scenario is when GPs refer patients to the wrong speciality and it can happen frequently as symptoms blur between conditions. This leads to delayed diagnosis, delayed management and you guessed it, increased hospitalisation. The obvious example is whether patients with breathlessness is caused by heart or lung or is psychogenic. As GPs we need to work up patients appropriately and make a best choice based on the evidence in front of us. Peer to peer GP delayed referral letter analysis groups have a place in this process. Conclusion At the end of the day it's about appropriate referrals always, not just a reduction. Indeed for us to get a grip on the NHS Budgets as future Clinical Commissioners, I would expect outpatient referrals to go up at the expense of non-elective, as then you are looking at patients being seen and diagnosed earlier and kept out of hospital.  
Raza Toosy
almost 9 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 159552n?1444774079
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Current Social Media Guidance

Hello & Welcome! You may have already read my blog on 'My Top 5 Tips to use Social Media to Improve your Medical Education' and if so you will have an idea of what 'Social Media' is and how it can be harnessed to improve medical education. There are also features that could improve health promotion and communication but today I would like to focus on where we have to be careful with these resources. In my last blog I circumnavigated the drawbacks of social media in medicine so that I could give them the full attention they deserve in their own blog today. But its not all doom and gloom! I also hope to give you a brief overview of the current social media guidance that is available to doctors and medical students and how we can minimise the risks associated with representing ourselves online. But firstly, what actually is social media and why do i keep blogging about it? If you are new here I recommend giving 'Social Media' a quick google, but the phrase basically includes any website where the user (i.e. you) can upload information and interact with other users. Thats a definition of the top of my head, so don't hold me to it, but most people would agree that this definition includes the classic examples of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Linkedin etc, but there are many many more. These sites are important to us as (future) health professionals because they can be both used and unfortunately abused. However, several medical bodies including the General Medical Council and the Royal College of General Practitioners agree that these resources are here to stay and they shouldn't (and probably couldn't) be excommunicated. With this in mind, there has been much guidance on the topic, but as you are about to find out a lot of it is common sense and your own personal discretion. Before you read on, I'd like to forewarn you that I try and keep things lighthearted with this topic. I'll hope you can excuse my levity of the situation, especially if any of the original authors of these guidelines end up reading this post. But as I am sure you are aware, this is a dry topic and hard to digest without the odd joke or two... British Medical Association - Using Social Media: practical and ethical guidance for doctors and medical 2011 The BMA guidance is the earliest guidance originating from a major medical body that i've come across. That said, I have not done a proper literature review of the subject. This is a blog, not a dissertation. But still, the BMA gives an early and brief summary of the problems facing health professionals using social media. Key points such as patient confidentiality, personal privacy, defamation, copyright and online professionalism are covered and therefore it is a nice starting point. It is also quite a short document, which may appeal to those who are less feverent on the subject. On the other hand, I personally feel that the BMA guidance does social media an injustice by not going into the great benefits these resources can yield. There are also no really practical tips or solutions for the drawbacks they've highlighted to students. Read it for yourself here or just google 'BMA Guidance Social Media' Royal College of General Practitioners - Social Media Highway Code Feb 2013 The RCGP guidelines are my favourite. After a cheesy introduction likening the social media surge with the dawn of the automobile they then take a turn for the worse by trying to continue the metaphor further by sharing a 'Social Media Highway Code'. Their Top 10 Tips that form the majority of the code don't look to be much more than common sense. However, each chapter there after dissects each of their recommendations in great detail and provides practical tips on how to make the most from social media whilst protecting yourself from the issues raised above. As I mentioned earlier, the RCGP recognise the inevitability of social media and they acknowledge this in the better part of their introduction. They make a great point that older doctors have a responsibility to become technologically savvy, whereas younger doctors who have grown up engrossed in social networking probably have to develop their professionalism skills more than their older colleagues (I'm aware this is a generalising statement). Either way, the RCGP highlight that everyone has something to take away from this set of guidelines. Read it for yourself here or google; 'RCGP Social Media Guidance,' but be warned, this is one of the more lengthy documents available on the topic. General Medical Council - Doctor's Use of Social Media April 2013 The GMC guidance kicks off with a little summary of the relevant bits of 'Good Medical Practice.' Again, nothing much that isn't common sense. That being said, they then go on to write that 'Serious or persistent failure to follow this guidance will put your registration at risk,' which sounds ominous and probably warrants a quick flick through (do it now! - the PDF is at the bottom of their page). Reassuringly, the GMC does not try and place a blanket ban on social media. They give a 'tip of the hat' to the benefits of social media and then go on to outline all the drawbacks as many of the guidance already has. Asides from the issue of anonymity there is really nothing new covered and the GMC actually gives a lot of autonomy to doctors and medical students. However, the GMC are, in many ways, who we ultimately answer to and so you would be a fool not to revisit the issues they cover in their version of the guidance. As I mentioned, the GMC brought online anonymity to the forefront of our minds. Should we, shouldn't we? A lot of health professionals believe that the human right to a private life extends to the right to have anonymity online. However, before we go into this any further lets take a closer look at what the GMC actually says... If you identify yourself as a doctor in publicly accessible social media, you should also identify yourself by name. Any material written by authors who represent themselves as doctors is likely to be taken on trust and may reasonably be taken to represent the view of the profession more widely. As you can see, the use of the phrase 'Should also identify yourself by name' gives some room for manoeuvre and is a world apart from what could have been written (i.e. you must). To those who believe their human rights are being infringed, perhaps a solution is to stop identifying yourself as a doctor online, although I appreciate this can be difficult if you are tagged in certain things. There are a number of good points why doctors shouldn't be anonymous online and it is certainly a must if you are in the trade of offering health promotion via the world wide web. However, I can see the point of those who want to remain anonymous for comical or satirical purposes. A quick google of the topic will reveal that the GMC has said that they do not envisage fitness to practice issues arising from doctors remaining anonymous online, but from the temptations that arise from running an anonymous profile such as cyber-bullying and misinformation. Read the GMC guidance yourself here. National Health Service (Health Education) - Social Media in Education May 2013 The NHS-HE guidelines are high quality and cover the entire scope of what social media means to medicine. There are several key issues that I haven't encountered elsewhere. This set of guidance is written from a managerial, technical perspective. It doesn't really feel aimed at doctors or medical students but it gives such an overview of the subject that I thought it was worth including. If you feel brave enough, read it for yourself here. Conclusion To my knowledge, these are the current key guidelines for the use of social media in medicine. I hope you have found this blog useful in providing a quick summary of a topic that is becoming increasingly swamped with lengthy guidelines. In the future we need to see material produced or delivered that educates health professionals in how to use social media, rather than regurgitating the pros and cons every couple of months. I think webicina is a good example of a social media 'training course,' . There should be more material like this. Perhaps this is where I'm headed with my next project... As always, if you have anything to add to this blog, please feel free to add to the comments below. I will be able to take difficult queries forwards with me to the Doctors 2.0 conference next week! If you are a student and interested in coming to the conference in Paris next week you should get in contact with me directly (@LFarmery on twitter). Also, it would be a great help if you could fill out my very quick pilot survey to help me understand how doctors and medical students currently use social media. Also see my website Occipital Designs LARF Disclaimer The thoughts and feelings expressed here are those produced by my own being and are not representative in part or whole of any organisation or company. Occipital Designs is a rather clunky, thinly veiled, pseudonym. If you would like to contact me please do so on Twitter...  
Dr. Luke Farmery
over 8 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 3cqojv?1444774240
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Goodbye fear and ego, hello better patient care

The best doctors in the world still have bad consultation. Sometimes you just start off on the wrong foot. The patient leaving in a floor of tears is usually an indication that this has just occurred. On one of my medical placements I witnessed one such consultation. A young woman in the early stages of her pregnancy had a per vaginal bleed and wanted a scan to see if the pregnancy was still ok. Medically speaking, a scan wasn’t indicated as the pregnancy was too early on to detect any changes. The doctors noted the “agenda” as they later remarked, and was not going to “play the game” and send the young woman for a scan. She was not happy about this. The doctor felt that he couldn’t have done more. Medically there was nothing he could offer to the woman other than advice to go home and wait a little while before repeating a pregnancy test. To me, there was lots that could have been done. This woman was scared and worried and a sympathetic ear and a tissue would have gone some way to making her feel better. The doctor I was with couldn’t see this. They were blind sighted by the repeated requests for a scan and slightly frustrated that the unhelpfulness of this was not being understood. When the young woman began to cry I was waiting for the doctor to hand over a tissue. “Any second now...” I thought, but it never happened. I wanted to give the woman a tissue and put my arm around her but that would have meant physically placing myself between the doctor and the patients and interrupting a consultation I wasn’t really a part of. But the truth is. I was a part of that consultation. I might not have been the doctor in charge but I was another person in that room who could have made that situation easier for that patient and I didn’t. Hours later, on my way home, I was still thinking about this. I felt I had let that woman down. I could see what she needed and I sat there and did nothing. After the consultation I immediately told the doctor what I thought. I felt that the patient had been let down. They took on what I said and mostly agreed with it. All egos were put aside in that frank conversation and the doctor genuinely reflected on how they could have done better in that situation. It wasn’t about me or the doctor. It was about the patient. As a medical student it is easy to feel in the way in the hospital environment or in a busy clinic. When the consultant is running behind, it takes a lot to ask the patients something or butt in and add something you think is relevant that in the end may turn out to be a very trivial thing. But at the end of the day, it is worth it if it means that there is a better out come for the patient because when all is said and done they are the ones we are doing this all for. I regret not handing that patient a tissue and it’s a mistake I hope never to repeat again.  
Salma Aslam
almost 8 years ago
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Upper Limb Arteries - Hand and Wrist - 3D Anatomy Tutorial

Blood supply to the hand and wrist upper limb arteries anatomy tutorial. Check out the 3D app at http://AnatomyLearning.com. More tutorials available on http...  
youtube.com
almost 7 years ago
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3
52

3D Printed Models Helped Surgeons Prepare for World’s First Pediatric Bilateral Hand Transplant

As many 8-year-old boys do, Zion Harvey wanted to swing on the monkey bars and to pick up his little sister and swing her around as they played. Zion, however, is unlike many other children his age, demonstrating not only life experience but a resilience and wisdom beyond his years; when he was only...  
3dprint.com
over 6 years ago
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Osteology of the hand

After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to: Identify and describe bony features of the carpals, metacarpals and phalange...  
youtube.com
almost 6 years ago