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43

ANATOMY; VISCERAL SMOOTH MUSCLE & CARDIAC MUSCLE HISTOLOGY by Professor Fink

In this Video-Lecture Professor Fink describes the Histology (Microanatomy) of Visceral Smooth Muscle and Cardiac Muscle, while comparing and contrasting the...  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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3

ANATOMY; MYOLOGY; PART 3; DISEASES & DISORDERS IN MUSCLES by Professor Fink

In Myology; Part 3, Professor Fink describes a number of examples of Diseases & Disorders in Skeletal Muscles. These include: Muscle Agenesis, Hernias (Umbil...  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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7

ANATOMY; MUSCLES OF THE FACE & HEAD by Professor Fink

This is Part 1 of 5 Video Lectures on the Skeletal Muscle Groups of the Human Body by Professor Fink. In this Video Lecture, Professor Fink describes the Fac...  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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21

Larynx Anatomy (4 of 5): Muscles - Head and Neck Anatomy 101

We've had a great response to our last set of videos so far, so we're thrilled that some of you are finding them helpful! One of the first year dental studen...  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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30

Muscle Relaxants [UndergroundMed]

For more videos, check out our website at http://videos.undergroundmed.net  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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106

Dr. Preddy Lower Limbs Part 1

Discussion of lower limb muscles, nerves, and arteries.  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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23

Examination of the hand and wrist | Arthritis Research UK

It is most comfortable for the patient to have their hands positioned on a pillow. In this position look for obvious swellings, loss of alignment, muscle wasting and scars. Try to decide if changes are symmetrical or asymmetrical. Look at the nails for psoriatic changes of pitting and onycholysis, and also nailfold vasculitis.  
arthritisresearchuk.org
about 7 years ago
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31

Examination of the shoulder | Arthritis Research UK

With both shoulders fully exposed, look from the front, the side and behind the patient for obvious loss of symmetry, muscle wasting or scars.  
arthritisresearchuk.org
about 7 years ago
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109

Teres Minor Muscle - Origin, Insertion, Innervation & Action - Human Anatomy | Kenhub

Find more videos at: https://www.kenhub.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/VOEG2I The teres minor muscle is one of the muscles of the rotato...  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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129

Teres Major Muscle - Origin, Insertion, Innervation & Action - Human Anatomy | Kenhub

Find more videos at: https://www.kenhub.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/VOEG2I The Teres major is a thick muscle of the shoulder joint. I...  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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53

Infraspinatus Muscle - Attachments & Action/Function - Human Anatomy | Kenhub

Find more videos at: https://www.kenhub.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/VOEG2I The infraspinatus muscle is the fourth muscle of the rotat...  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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104

Iliopsoas Muscle - Action / Function, Anatomy & Innervation - Human Anatomy | Kenhub

Find more videos at: https://www.kenhub.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/VOEG2I The iliopsoas muscle belongs to the inner hip muscles. It ...  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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67

Untitled Document

The specialized nodal and conducting cells of the heart are responsible for heartbeat. These specialized nodal and conducting cells tend to contract weakly because they contain very few contractile cells (myofibrils). What makes these cells unique is that they can easily generate an action potential (electrical impulse that causes the heart to beat) without the assistance of neurotransmitters or any nervous system input like any regular neurons. Along with these special properties of self-excitability, these cells can also rapidly conduct impulses to atrial and ventricular muscles. This explains why after death, the heart continues pumping because of the nodal and conducting cells; this is because the nodal and conducting cells are not hooked up with any neurotransmitters. Therefore, these specialized cells provide a self-excitatory system for the heart to generate impulses and a transmission system for rapid conduction of impulses in the heart.  
odec.ca
almost 7 years ago
Www.bmj
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38

Managing common symptoms of cerebral palsy in children

Cerebral palsy is a disorder of movement and posture secondary to abnormal muscle tone, spasticity being the most common abnormality of tone  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
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20

Focal neurological deficits after trauma

A 38 year old woman developed headache (without neck pain) and weakness of her left upper and lower limbs after a concussive head trauma with scalp lacerations in a motor vehicle crash. On examination (more than 4.5 hours after the trauma), she was conscious, alert, and in cardiac sinus rhythm. There was no carotid bruit. She scored 7 points on the National Institute of Health stroke scale (maximum possible score 42). Positive neurological findings included mild blunting of the left nasolabial fold; left hemiparesis, with extensor muscles being weaker (3/5) than flexors in the left upper limb (4+/5), flexors being weaker (4 to 4+/5) than extensors in the left lower limb (4+ to 5/5), and distal more than proximal weakness in the left arm and leg. She also had brisk deep tendon reflexes in the limbs on the left side; a left extensor plantar response; left hemianopia; and left hemisensory (including the face) hypoaesthesia for pain, cold, and touch. Eyelid ptosis or paresis of extraocular movements were not present, and pupillary size and light reaction were normal.  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
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25

“It’s just a muscle sprain”

A 10 year old boy presented to his general practitioner with a four week history of left mid-thigh pain with no associated history of systemic symptoms. He had no memory of a preceding trauma and no history of infection, locally or systemically. The pain was relapsing and remitting in its extent and frequency. It was also activity related, with occasional night waking and pain at rest. His GP took a full history, conducted a complete hip examination, and at initial presentation decided that the pain was caused by a muscle sprain.  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago
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11

Anatomy Of The Gluteus Maximus Muscle - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Educational video describing the anatomy of the gluteus maximus muscle. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter:...  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
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11

Managing muscle injuries – Does the Munich Consensus Statement help? Part 2 of 2

Stream Managing muscle injuries – Does the Munich Consensus Statement help? Part 2 of 2 by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 6 years ago
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47

Thyroid Anatomy

The thyroid gland is a highly vascularized organ located anteriorly in the neck, deep to the platysma, sternothyroid and sternohyoid muscles, and extending from the 5th cervical  (C5) to the 1st thoracic (T1) vertebrae.  The gland consists of two lobes (left and right) connected by a thin, median isthmus overlying the 2nd to 4th tracheal rings, typically forming an "H" or "U" shape.  Occasionally the isthmus is absent and the thyroid exists as two distinct lobes.  Embryologically, the thyroid gland develops as a thickening in the pharyngeal floor that elongates inferiorly as the thyroglossal duct, dividing into two lobes as it descends through the neck  
fitsweb.uchc.edu
over 6 years ago
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Muscle-Building Supplements Linked to Testicular Cancer

A case-control study suggests that men who use muscle-building supplements are at 65% increased risk for testicular cancer.  
medscape.com
over 6 years ago