New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In
view moderators

PhysicalAndRehabilitationMedicine

Category

Preview 300x365
12
1241

Pleural effusion x-ray (left-sided)

This PA Chest X-Ray demonstrates a left sided pleural effusion. In this condition fluid collects between the parietal and visceral pleura and appears as a shadowy fluid level on the X-Ray with obliteration of the costophrenic angles. If you were to examine this patient they might be in respiratory distress from reduced oxygen uptake (so have low sats, high resp rate, possible cyanosis and accessory muscle useage) - they may have reduced chest expansion on the affected side and it would be stony dull to percussion. Fluid transmits sound poorly so breath sounds would be decreased as would vocal resonance/fremitus. Someone with consolidation may have very similar clinical findings but the underlying area of lung is almost solid due to pus from the infective process - as sounds travel well through solids they would have increased vocal fremitus which is how you can clinically differentiate between the two conditions. Clinical examination and understanding of conditions is paramount to practice effective medicine. Before you recieved this X-Ray you should be able to diagnose the condition and use the X-Ray to confirm your suspicions.  
Rhys Clement
about 11 years ago
Preview
12
319

The Abdominal Wall - Muscles of the Trunk

A slideshow on The Abdominal Wall - Muscles of the Trunk  
Mr Raymond Buick
almost 9 years ago
Preview
12
623

The Skull Bones - Cranial foramina and contents

Here I cover the foramina (aka holes) in the skull and review what goes through them. Hopefully you find this to be helpful, and please remember to check wit...  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
Preview
11
225

Anatomy of the thorax

Surface anatomy cardio respiratory system IVC- approx 20cm runningdownon righthandside of vertebral column. Sternal angle Suprasternal/JugularNotch Apex of the…  
fsdfsdf dgfdsfs
over 9 years ago
Preview
11
1088

Muscle Power and Tone Examination

Guide to doing a clinical exam on muscle, power and tone by the clinical skills tutors at the University of Liverpool  
Mary
about 8 years ago
250x250
11
305

Nervous System - Occupational Therapy Student Info

Use mind maps to discover and develop your understanding of Occupational Therapy - this visual resource for OT students uses mindmeister to organise concepts.  
otstudent.info
over 5 years ago
Preview
11
808

Basic Chest Radiography + ICU Radiology

Understand the role of radiologist in ICU/CCU.  
youtube.com
about 5 years ago
Preview
10
440

Skull Anatomy Mnemonic (1/3): Bone Tutorial- Neurocranium: Sphenoid Ethmoid Parietal Temporal Bones

Anatomy flashcards at: http://helphippo.com/flash/flashcards.html To learn all skull bones, combine this mnemonic with our facial bone tutorial at http://youtu.be/etxFV6UsKfM Please SUBSCRIBE: more cool stuff as we get more Hippo Helpers! Anatomy mnemonic playist at: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIPkjUW-piR2QuaJ7zaxA7X-A9netP0cK  
HelpHippo.com
almost 7 years ago
Preview
10
467

Muscle Spindles & GTO

Action of muscle spindles under stretch and golgi tendon organs under excess tension.  
youtube.com
over 5 years ago
Preview 300x246
9
569

CXR - left sided pneumothorax and surgical emphysema

In this Chest X-Ray we can identify a left sided pneumothorax - there is absence of lung markings in the periphery and we can also see a shadow which outlines the edge of the lung. A pneumothorax is caused when air enters the potential space between the viceral and parietal pleura and causes the lung to collapse down under the pressure of it's elsatic recoil. In this case it is likely that the pneumothorax has been caused by trauma as we can see air in the soft tissues on the left side (surgical emphysema - clinically feels like bubble wrap). A pneumothorax can be a life threatening condition. The patient presents in respiratory distress with decreased expansion on the affected side. There will be hyperresonance to percussion on that side but absent breath sounds. The emergency treatment is decompression with a large bore cannula in the 2nd intercostal space mid-clavicular line followed by insertion a chest drain in the 5th intercostal space mid-axilllary line  
Rhys Clement
about 11 years ago
Preview
9
74

C-Spine Injury - Collar Application (Initial Assessment of a Trauma Patient).wmv

This video - produced by students at Oxford University Medical School in conjunction with the faculty - demonstrates how to size and fit a C-spine collar.<br>It is part of a series of videos on the Initial Assessment of a Trauma Patient.  
Hussam Rostom
over 8 years ago
Preview 300x218
9
438

Shoulder Muscles, Ligaments & Vessels - Anterior and Posterior Views

This image is part of our online anatomy trainer. We are happy to share it with the meducation community. Stop worrying about learning anatomy and start doing it the efficient way. Sign up at [www.kenhub.com](https://www.kenhub.com "www.kenhub.com") to pass your next anatomy exam with ease.  
Niels Hapke
over 7 years ago
Preview 300x300
9
247

Shoulder Muscles

This image is part of our online anatomy trainer. We are happy to share it with the meducation community. Stop worrying about learning anatomy and start doing it the efficient way. Sign up at [www.kenhub.com](https://www.kenhub.com "www.kenhub.com") to pass your next anatomy exam with ease.  
Niels Hapke
over 7 years ago
Maxresdefault
9
512

How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 2 - A Systematic Method and Anatomy)

A description of a systematic method for examining a chest X-ray, and a review of the relevant thoracic anatomy.  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
Maxresdefault
9
326

How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 1 - An Introduction)

An introduction to the interpretation of chest X-rays, covering the basic principles of using X-rays in medical imaging, as well as the conventional X-ray vi...  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
Preview
9
543

An easy way to remember arm muscles PART 1

Dr Preddy teaching anatomy at Touro University Nevada  
YouTube
about 6 years ago
Preview
9
602

An easy way to remember neck muscles by Dr Preddy

Discussion of muscles associated with hyoid suspension as well as trachea and esophageal associations.  
YouTube
about 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1nh0xw?1444774170
9
335

A Comedy of Errors

Great people make mistakes. Unfortunately, medicine is a subject where mistakes are not tolerated. Doctors are supposed to be infallible; or, at least, that is the present dogma. Medical students regularly fall victim to expecting too much of themselves, but this is perhaps not a bad trait when enlisting as a doctor. If it weren’t for mistakes in our understanding, then we wouldn’t progress. Studying a BSc in Anatomy has exposed me to the real world of science – where the negative is just as important as the positive. What isn’t there is just as important as what is. If you look into the history of Anatomy, it truly is a comedy of errors. So, here are three top mistakes by three incredibly influential figures who still managed to be remembered for the right reasons. 3. A Fiery Stare Culprit: Alcmaeon of Croton Go back far enough and you’ll bump into someone called Alcmaeon. Around the 5th century, he was one of the first dissectors – but not an anatomist. Alcmaeon was concerned with human intellect and was desperately searching for the seat of the soul. He made a number of major errors - quite understandable for his time! Alcmaeon insisted that sleep occurs when the blood vessels filled and we wake when they empty. Perhaps the most outrageous today is the fact that he insisted the eyes contained water both fire and water… Don’t be quick to mock. Alcmaeon identified the optic tract, the brain as the seat of the mind (along with Herophilus) and the Eustachian tubes. 2. Heart to Heart Culprit: Claudius Galen Legend has it that Galen’s father had a dream in which an angel/deity visited him and told him that his son would be a great physician. That would have to make for a pretty impressive opening line in a personal statement by today’s standards. Galen was highly influential on modern day medicine and his treatise of Anatomy and healing lasted for over a thousand years. Many of Galen’s mistakes were due to his dissections of animals rather than humans. Unfortunately, dissection was banned in Galen’s day and where his job as physician to the gladiators provided some nice exposed viscera to study, it did not allow him to develop a solid foundation. Galen’s biggest mistake lay in the circulation. He was convinced that blood flowed in a back and forth, ebb-like motion between the chambers of the heart and that it was burnt by muscle for fuel. Many years later, great physician William Harvey proposed our modern understanding of circulation. 1. The Da Vinci Code Culprit: Leonardo Da Vinci If you had chance to see the Royal Collection’s latest exhibition then you were in for a treat. It showcased the somewhat overlooked anatomical sketches of Leonardo Da Vinci. A man renowned for his intelligence and creativity, Da Vinci also turns out to be a pretty impressive anatomist. In his sketches he produces some of the most advanced 3D representations of the human skeleton, muscles and various organs. One theory of his is, however, perplexing. In his sketches is a diagram of the spinal cord……linked to penis. That’s right, Da Vinci was convinced the two were connected (no sexist comments please) and that semen production occurred inside the brain and spinal cord, being stored and released at will. He can be forgiven for the fact that he remarkably corrected himself some years later. His contributions to human physiology are astounding for their time including identification of a ‘hierarchal’ nervous system, the concept of equal ‘inheritence’ and identification of the retina as a ‘light sensing organ’. The list of errors is endless. However, they’re not really errors. They’re signposts that people were thinking. All great people fail, otherwise they wouldn’t be great.  
Lucas Brammar
about 7 years ago